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  • Justin Darlington

    is a 26yo spectacular dunker who is now in training for the HJ [home-page-linked article]

    If you go to youtube you can see many clips of his dunks and now his HJ training. I find this a very fascinating experiment, cuz it sure looks like he can fly when he dunks, but if you notice, he always takes off 2-footed. In my coaching career, I have had a few prospects who could dunk from 2 feet, but couldn't make the transition to 1. Justin (aka Jus Fly) has been HJing for 6 months and is almost up to 7'.

    He's Canuckian, but we shouldn't hold that against him. :twisted:

  • #2
    Ill be very interested in his progress. This shows the difference between a two foot and one foot jumper though. Think of this guy doing ridiculous dunks and only going 2.10 so far, and donald thomas going 2.22 in his first meet. This guy definitely has the body for HJ, now itll be about teaching him the timing.

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    • #3
      I strongly disagree with the one-foot rule in high jump. It seems overly restrictive to me without a reason for being present. However, it is what it is...

      From watching some videos last month, I think I remember Jus Fly clearing over 7' by doing a 2-footed front-flip.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by rainy.here
        I think I remember Jus Fly clearing over 7' by doing a 2-footed front-flip.
        I'd believe 6'6 maybe, but 7' . . . ?

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        • #5
          The description says 2.10 and 2.19, but I don't believe it. Looks like about 2.00 to me.
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2X60Igu55I

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          • #6
            Originally posted by rainy.here
            The description says 2.10 and 2.19, but I don't believe it. Looks like about 2.00 to me.
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2X60Igu55I
            I agree; the bar the second time is about as high as his head when his feet are leaving the ground (i.e., height + toe/ankle flex). Since he is 1.93 (I think), I do not think there is any way that bar is another 26 cm above his height.

            I think that the one-foot rule is to keep the event a jump; that is, keep people from bouncing over the bar, including using a tumbling pass.

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            • #7
              I am not an expert on the biomechanics of jumping, but I'd be surprised, if any 2-foot jumper came close to the conventional HJ technique clearances.
              "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
              by Thomas Henry Huxley

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Pego
                I am not an expert on the biomechanics of jumping, but I'd be surprised, if any 2-foot jumper came close to the conventional HJ technique clearances.
                ZACKLY! The tumbling passes ARE done on (literally) sprung floors. I have done all sorts of jump testing in the last 16 years and although there are some people who can't get the hang of one-footed jumping, the verts of the 1-footers always surpass (relatively speaking) those of the 2-footers.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Marlow
                  Originally posted by Pego
                  I am not an expert on the biomechanics of jumping, but I'd be surprised, if any 2-foot jumper came close to the conventional HJ technique clearances.
                  ZACKLY! The tumbling passes ARE done on (literally) sprung floors. I have done all sorts of jump testing in the last 16 years and although there are some people who can't get the hang of one-footed jumping, the verts of the 1-footers always surpass (relatively speaking) those of the 2-footers.
                  With sprung floors I would not be surprised if the girls could do 8ft/2.50, much less 2.10. On a hard takeoff indoor floor (which would count for a record I suspect that winning heights are feasible, as are bad crashes. The sprung floors are there primarily for landings/shock, although they do add greatly to the height that can be achieved.

                  I think that the 'recoil/bounce' effect adds substantially to the jump effect achieved by the guy in that video.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 26mi235
                    I think that the 'recoil/bounce' effect adds substantially to the jump effect achieved by the guy in that video.
                    I'm not sure what you mean. The video shown was not done on a sprung floor, were you suggesting it was?

                    The comments on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pjtdq-SvUgM are interesting:

                    "I just saw Justin today in Brockville highjumping, He cleared 2m no problem, then tried 2m12cm, which would have beaten his coach's PB, but was unable to. Afterwards, he did a frontflip over the 2m12cm no problem. It was amazing."

                    Here are some examples of his leaping ability:
                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8tw0Gyfae4
                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6U85nq_2CgQ
                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y46pZq5FfRk

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rainy.here
                      he did a frontflip over the 2m12cm no problem. It was amazing."
                      Here are some examples of his leaping ability:
                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8tw0Gyfae4
                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6U85nq_2CgQ
                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y46pZq5FfRk
                      I would like to see the 2.12 frontflip video. There is actually nothing remarkable in those videos that dozens of NBA players can't do.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rainy.here
                        Originally posted by 26mi235
                        I think that the 'recoil/bounce' effect adds substantially to the jump effect achieved by the guy in that video.
                        I'm not sure what you mean. The video shown was not done on a sprung floor, were you suggesting it was?

                        The comments on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pjtdq-SvUgM are interesting:

                        "I just saw Justin today in Brockville high jumping, He cleared 2m no problem, then tried 2m12cm, which would have beaten his coach's PB, but was unable to. Afterwards, he did a frontflip over the 2m12cm no problem. It was amazing."

                        Here are some examples of his leaping ability:
                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8tw0Gyfae4
                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6U85nq_2CgQ
                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y46pZq5FfRk
                        I was referring to comments about the height obtained by gymnasts on the gymnastics 'floor' in my full comment and then also commented that that I thought that this guy got some rebound/recoil but the word 'substantially' was way too strong. (There were several videos, I was referring to one where a guy took two jumps that did not look like 2.12/2.19 or something like that but a bit lower.) I do think that tumbling adds to the height that can be achieved and is not 'high jumping', so the one-foot rule (cited by Dwight Stones in the Video on the Home Page, by the way) is appropriate.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Marlow
                          Originally posted by rainy.here
                          he did a frontflip over the 2m12cm no problem. It was amazing."
                          Here are some examples of his leaping ability:
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8tw0Gyfae4
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6U85nq_2CgQ
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y46pZq5FfRk
                          I would like to see the 2.12 frontflip video. There is actually nothing remarkable in those videos that dozens of NBA players can't do.
                          I remember (correctly?) from a long time ago that David Thompson (?) could jump up and put a dime on the top of the backboard.... and then land and jump immediately and take it back off. If correct, that is well beyond the guy in this video. Did DT have 46-inch vertical?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 26mi235
                            I remember (correctly?) from a long time ago that David Thompson (?) could jump up and put a dime on the top of the backboard.... and then land and jump immediately and take it back off. If correct, that is well beyond the guy in this video. Did DT have 46-inch vertical?
                            That is apocryphal - no video ever. There was a thread here about a Harlem 'Trotter who could dunk on a 12' rim. That's the highest I've ever see someone jump.

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                            • #15
                              Ive made this point in the past that being a good two foot jumper/dunker doesnt mean that much when it comes to high jumping. Can they jump 7' or possible even a little higher, sure, are they going to be 8 foot plus jumpers if they "only didnt play basketball and focused on high jump instead" nope!

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