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10-year-old Girl Phenom

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  • 26mi235
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    There's a little prayer some of our middle-school girls say.
    It's called, "Lord, please don't give me hips" :P

    On the other hand, the Romanian stars of yesteryear had full hips and they always seemed to do fine!
    There is an ex-gymnast PVer that has pretty solid hips (and everything else); those strong hips not only help coming down from 5m up but getting there in the first place. :wink:

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  • Marlow
    replied
    There's a little prayer some of our middle-school girls say.
    It's called, "Lord, please don't give me hips" :P

    On the other hand, the Romanian stars of yesteryear had full hips and they always seemed to do fine!

    Leave a comment:


  • jenjen8765
    replied
    To "unclezadok" -

    puberty doesn't have much to do with it? Most gymnasts are either DONE when they hit puberty, or delay puberty with excessively restrictive diets. The exceptions prove the rule. Have you ever coached girls? You can up their training and starve them and try to fend it off (not recommended for quite a number of reasons). A few sail through merely growing a bit and moving into a more adult strength (that's their genes, there), but that maturation phase is not to be dismissed lightly.

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  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by Powell
    I know Decker was a child prodigy, but had she done anything of note before age 11?
    Earliest mark I can find is a 2:15.8 800 at age 12. It's hard to believe she debuted that fast. :shock:

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  • unclezadok
    replied
    She is probably more likely to do something in the sport as an adult than somebody of that age sitting on the couch playing video games.

    It would be interesting if someone were to do an actual study of how national contenders in track and field ranked in their sport at ages 10-12. I'll bet it would be found that a significantly higher percentage of national rankers came from the top ten rankings at those ages than positions 10-20 and even higher than from positions 20-30, and so on.

    My theory is that the main obstacle to continued success at later ages is the necessity of doing progressively more training as one gets older and competes at higher levels. This is probably true of all fields of endeavor, playing the violin, mathematics, writing poetry, etc. I am pretty sure that puberty has very little to do with it. It doesn't even affect women's gymnastics that much. Girls who are good distance runners or gymnasts at a young age tend not to mature into Sophia Loren, but into the body type of say, Mary Decker or Nastia Liukin. There are exceptions of course.

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  • 26mi235
    replied
    Originally posted by Powell
    Originally posted by Marlow
    I really for every Mary Decker there are dozens of whatever-happened-to's, but Mary Decker DID do it, so THERE! :twisted:
    I know Decker was a child prodigy, but had she done anything of note before age 11?
    I do not think she had run a race until she and a friend entered a race at about age 13. She did 'very well' in that first race. Natural talent to beat the band.

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  • Powell
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    I really for every Mary Decker there are dozens of whatever-happened-to's, but Mary Decker DID do it, so THERE! :twisted:
    I know Decker was a child prodigy, but had she done anything of note before age 11?

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  • Marlow
    replied
    I realize for every Mary Decker there are dozens of whatever-happened-to's, but Mary Decker DID do it, so THERE! :twisted:

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Originally posted by Big Daddy
    Good times for someone so young. She has to keep working. She will improve over time.
    Pretty unlikely. At age 10 the difference between boys and girls is negligible. It's when the hormones kick in at about age 14 that they diverge.

    A few years ago, my old high school won the girls state cross country title. The following year all of the girls came back, but got 4th losing the state title to another team that had all freshmen on their first seven. That would never happen on the boys side.

    PS. Also at my old HS the girls' school records for 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600 and 3200 are all held by sophomores.

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  • robert5744
    replied
    Originally posted by Big Daddy
    Well put Mista' Robert5744
    Thank you sir.

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  • Big Daddy
    replied
    Well put Mista' Robert5744

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  • robert5744
    replied
    I find it quite amusing when reading the threads and subsequent postings come up when talking about a very young athlete. Give me a break. This girl (not young lady) is 10 years old. How many 10 year olds in any sport or anything else for that matter turn out to be the next --------------------------(fill in the blank). Were talking about a child This is the same type of talk that goes on about some kid who hit a baseball, catch/throw a football, etc. With the exception of Tiger Woods among a very few others 10 year old phenoms are just that And yet, these types of threads are posted with the expectation that this one is really going to be the SUPER STAR of the future. Let this child be just that, a child. Shall we gather around in say 5-10 years and see what's happened to her?. IMO, let children, no matter what they do stay that child for as long as they can. Just a reminder how Michael Jackson was pushed and tormented by his father. Sure MJ reached the top, but what a price he paid. Just my thoughts.

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  • Powell
    replied
    How many 10-year old phenoms in history went on to be top stars at the senior level?

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  • catson52
    replied
    Fantastic times. Let's wish her the best for both results and longevity.

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  • jenjen8765
    replied
    Or puberty will hit her like a Mack Truck, not including getting 'boy crazy' or burnt out, or coach/parent conflicts (or needing a parent-ectomy) or the whole other raft of distractions that can happen to anyone, with or without 'talent.'

    Because athletics is a subset of the entertainment industry, it requires the careful management of 'hype.' But an athlete is DONE when they start actually believing the hype.

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