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USATF Indoor Headed To Albuquerque For 3-Year Run

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  • USATF Indoor Headed To Albuquerque For 3-Year Run

    USATF release re 2010-2012 indoor nationals reminds us that this meet helps to determine USA entrants for the World Indoor Championships.

    But no mention of Albuquerque altitude and its effect upon distance runners seeking WC qualifying times -- and whether the venue will give some an advantage but create a problem for others.

    Some forum participants may have insights to share concerning this.

  • #2
    Depending on the timing of the meet, could be a moot point; has happened before that the meet is actually outside the qualifying window for marks for the Worlds (coming like the weekend before), so if you don't have it coming in, you don't go.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by gh
      Depending on the timing of the meet, could be a moot point; has happened before that the meet is actually outside the qualifying window for marks for the Worlds (coming like the weekend before), so if you don't have it coming in, you don't go.
      At least in 2010, the US Champs are 2 weeks before World Indoors and are within the qualifying window (March 1, 2010).

      The IAAF does allow outdoor marks, but at a tougher standard for many events:

      http://www.iaaf.org/mm/document/competi ... _10573.pdf

      It IS true that hosting the meet at altitude takes away an opportunity for some to get the standard, but I don't believe that's reason enough not to have it in Albuquerque.

      Comment


      • #4
        Aside from the obvious difficulties in running the Standard at Nationals, in events longer than 800 metres, isn't there a huge advantage gained by those who are living/training/racing at altitude? I know it's "only" qualifying for World Indoors, but it seems about as fair as holding the Olympics in Mexico City, and expecting sea-level runners to have a chance. I would say, and it won't happen of course, but break the events down, and run the 1500 and longer races in Seattle, or somewhere like that... The advantage gained by the distance runners competing on a 307 metre track would be about equal to the power/speed athletes competing at 7000 feet plus - yes?

        Comment


        • #5
          one thing to remember is that indoors there's no steeple or 10, and the 5 becomes a 3, so the number of affected events is pretty minimal (and not worth losing a good site over partic. with no WIC two of the three years).

          Don't know what teh 2010 standards are, but for last year the 1500/3K marks were 3:43.00, 7:54.00, 4:16.00, 9:05.00.

          If you haven't run that fast before the Nationals, you probably don't deserve to be considered for the team anyway.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by gh
            one thing to remember is that indoors there's no steeple or 10, and the 5 becomes a 3, so the number of affected events is pretty minimal (and not worth losing a good site over partic. with no WIC two of the three years).

            Don't know what teh 2010 standards are, but for last year the 1500/3K marks were 3:43.00, 7:54.00, 4:16.00, 9:05.00.

            If you haven't run that fast before the Nationals, you probably don't deserve to be considered for the team anyway.
            Yes, I agree with the later statement. What I'm trying to say is that those who are altitude-centred have a huge advantage at the Trials in the 1500 and particularly the 3000 m. Not worth losing any sleep over, perhaps, just stating the facts, jack...

            Comment


            • #7
              not worth losing a good site over partic. with no WIC two of the three years//

              isnt the world meet on 2010 and 2012 ? so for only one of the years (2011) it wont be a wic qualifying meet.

              Comment


              • #8
                Sorry for the lousy formatting. You can view the Q standards at:

                http://www.iaaf.org/mm/document/competi ... _10573.pdf

                IAAF World Indoor Championships 2010 12-14 March 2010 - Doha, Qatar Entry Standards
                TRACK EVENTS
                MEN
                WOMEN
                Indoor
                Outdoor
                Indoor
                Outdoor
                60m
                6.69
                10.20 (100m)
                7.37
                11.25 (100m)
                400m
                47.00
                45.25
                53.25
                51.25
                800m
                1:48.50
                1:45.50
                2:04.00
                2:00.00
                1500m
                3:42.50 /
                4:00.00 (mile)
                3:34.50 /
                3:52.00 (mile)
                4:15.00 /
                4:32.00 (mile)
                4:04.00 /
                4:22.00 (mile)
                3000m
                7:54.00
                7:44.00 /
                13:19.00 (5000m)
                9:03.00
                8:38.00 /
                15:02.00 (5000m)
                4x400m Relay
                no standard
                60m hurdles
                7.74
                13.55 (110mH)
                8.18
                12.95 (100mH)
                FIELD EVENTS
                MEN
                WOMEN
                High Jump
                2.28
                1.92
                Pole Vault
                5.70
                4.40
                Long Jump
                8.10
                6.60
                Triple Jump
                16.95
                14.05
                Shot Put
                20.00
                17.50

                Comment


                • #9
                  Perhaps the greater obstacle for American 1500/3000 runners than the altitude in Albuquerque is the fact that the IAAF doesn't accept marks from oversized tracks:

                  "For the running events of 400m and over, performances achieved on oversized tracks will NOT be accepted."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dl
                    Perhaps the greater obstacle for American 1500/3000 runners than the altitude in Albuquerque is the fact that the IAAF doesn't accept marks from oversized tracks:

                    "For the running events of 400m and over, performances achieved on oversized tracks will NOT be accepted."
                    This. There aren't many fast races held on 200 meter tracks anymore, and I don't think there are too many legal indoor tracks on the west coast. Boise State is the furthest west track I can think of off the top of my head that is a good 200 meter banked track that is not at altitude.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      An important distinction, though, is that I think you'll find that most of the fast OT running is done by collegians, not by open people. And collegians don't go to the World Indoor, so what/where they do their running isn't terribly germane here.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        altitude, humidity, other factors

                        While many seem to get very upset about a meet being placed at altitude (especially for the distance runners), those same folks never seem to care about a meet like the outdoor championships being placed at a site where the humidity/temperature are high. Running distance races in Austin, Texas, or Baton Rouge, LA are very difficult for distance runners, so those people at altitude who want to host the meet have every right too. I remember my first DI championship in Houston, and the heat/humidity was so bad that distance runners were dropping to the track during the race, and some had to be taken to the hospital. Is altitude as bad as this? Performances are slow when the heat/humidity are high. Even at SacSt they ran some of the distance races at about 7:30pm and it was almost unbearablly hot. I remember the distance runners sweating profusely after only two laps of the 5000.

                        Finding a place that really wants a championship, and can do a good job at the championship has gotten so difficult that when a place like Alb goes for it, we should be happy, and deal positively with the conditions.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If you're talking about the 1983 NCAA meet at Houston, Ed, I looked at the results and didn't see very many DNF's at all. In fact, only one guy in the 10k.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            We'll get our kicks on Route 66 ...

                            USATF knows the area and the hotels because it held its convention at the the convention center there in 2000, And, of course, there use to be a meet on the indoor circuit there back in the AAU and early TAC/USA days.

                            The basic problem is that there are not many sites interested in hosting the indoor championships. Before Boston, it was at the Armory in NYC for a year but some of the athletes complained about the lack of a warm-up area. The other alternatives would mostly be college sites.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by gm
                              If you're talking about the 1983 NCAA meet at Houston, Ed, I looked at the results and didn't see very many DNF's at all. In fact, only one guy in the 10k.
                              The only thing I remember well about that meet is that it was so hot that I actually drank Coca-Cola in the pressbox because they didn't have water. (I don't drink sodas)

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