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  • #16
    Originally posted by gh
    Ann Trason was a decent high school runner (Pacific Grove, Ca).. in '78 ran 9:58.2 (3K) and 35:11.2, which at the time made her the No. 2 prep ever (on a very fledgling list).

    One reason Trason was so much better than those around her in the ultras is her willingness to do things like Mile repeats in her training (as opposed to just running long stuff). She never lost sight of the importance of her track training.


    Also: After his retirement from collegiate coaching, Vigil was going to study the Tarahumaras and write a book about them himself. Then he got the call to work with Bob Larsen coaching the Team USA group. He told me, after all the years of him complaining to the powers that be about how America needs an organized training group for elites--like the Keyans, Ethiopians, et. al--there was no way he could refuse. [Besides, there would now be a group for Kastor!]

    The rest is history, but no book for Coach.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Brian
      Originally posted by gh
      Ann Trason was a decent high school runner (Pacific Grove, Ca).. in '78 ran 9:58.2 (3K) and 35:11.2, which at the time made her the No. 2 prep ever (on a very fledgling list).

      One reason Trason was so much better than those around her in the ultras is her willingness to do things like Mile repeats in her training (as opposed to just running long stuff). She never lost sight of the importance of her track training.


      Also: After his retirement from collegiate coaching, Vigil was going to study the Tarahumaras and write a book about them himself. Then he got the call to work with Bob Larsen coaching the Team USA group. He told me, after all the years of him complaining to the powers that be about how America needs an organized training group for elites--like the Keyans, Ethiopians, et. al--there was no way he could refuse. [Besides, there would now be a group for Kastor!]

      The rest is history, but no book for Coach.
      This stuff Brian mentioned is described in the book in some detail. Also, Vigil still planned on going back to study the Tarahumara after his work in Colorado, but apparently had a heart attack and his health prevented it.

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      • #18
        Here's one way to become an ultra runner.

        http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/07/0 ... ner&st=cse

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        • #19
          Originally posted by bambam
          This stuff Brian mentioned is described in the book in some detail. Also, Vigil still planned on going back to study the Tarahumara after his work in Colorado, but apparently had a heart attack and his health prevented it.

          Coach's book probably would have been written from a exercise science/physiology point of view. Educationally aimed, would be my guess. So maybe he will still get there someday.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by bambam
            This stuff Brian mentioned is described in the book in some detail. Also, Vigil still planned on going back to study the Tarahumara after his work in Colorado, but apparently had a heart attack and his health prevented it.

            Had the opportunity to pick up a copy and see for myself this past weekend. Devoured two chapters while standing by the rack and four more over a cup of coffee after I bought it.

            Honestly, I haven't enjoyed a book as much as I did this one in a long time. Very well-written by a former war correspondent (i.e., he knows how to get to the point when writing) with a clear respect for both the subject and the people involved. Some good points made on human physiology and the state of the human running body in the US. Some things arguable--but that sometimes helps make a good book a great one, one that questions the status quo and gets you thinking.

            Thanks for the heads-up, bambam!

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            • #21
              Re: Born to Run

              This book, Born to Run is still in hardcover and at major bookstores. Saw it in several bookstores this weekend while travelling to Chicago. It has apparently become a big bestseller, and a very surprising one. Good for the author on this one. It was a fun read.

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              • #22
                Re: Born to Run

                I wonder how many regular folk will be inspired by the "challenge" of these races, in the same vein as the "do a marathon" fanaticism that is sweeping the country....

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                • #23
                  Re: Born to Run

                  It was announced in Eugene that Born to Run was selected as the winner of TAFWA's new Cordner Nelson Award for the best book on running.

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