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Importance of Arm Drive To Sprinting.

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  • Big Daddy
    replied
    Most of the Jamaican runners that I associate with use their arms but it looks like they are skating. There is less knee lift but more extension from the hips. Like skating.

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  • Speedfirst
    replied
    Originally posted by Daisy
    Originally posted by Speedfirst
    thus nothing left in the tank final 100.
    Final 100?
    oops ops: yes final 100, sorry.

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  • Daisy
    replied
    Originally posted by Speedfirst
    thus nothing left in the tank final lap.
    Final 100?

    Leave a comment:


  • Speedfirst
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by Speedfirst
    I assume you're talking last lap of the 400m.
    That was the weakest part of MY 400 - I do know that!!! :twisted:
    That wasn't my weakest part, but yeah depending upon how fast you are in that 2nd 100m of your 1st 200m. Because you do have that free zone (ATP) for about 4-6 seconds starting off, some runners don't know how to transition that onto the 2nd 100m, thus nothing left in the tank final 100m.

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  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by Speedfirst
    I assume you're talking last lap of the 400m.
    That was the weakest part of MY 400 - I do know that!!! :twisted:

    Leave a comment:


  • Daisy
    replied
    Originally posted by Speedfirst
    Originally posted by Daisy
    I think this is what mojo's better half is saying above too.
    :wink: 8-)
    Oops, you think I'm in trouble now?

    Leave a comment:


  • track_expert
    replied
    arm drive important mainly during a drive phase, and for stability the rest of the way

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  • Speedfirst
    replied
    Originally posted by Daisy
    Originally posted by SQUACKEE
    My coach would yell on the last lap, "Use your arms"! It did help. If you can move your arms faster, the legs will follow.
    One problem with this strategy is that it could cause athletes to become more tense. This might be more detrimental compared to the perceived gains? I think this is what mojo's better half is saying above too.
    :wink: 8-)

    Leave a comment:


  • SQUACKEE
    replied
    Originally posted by Daisy
    Originally posted by SQUACKEE
    My coach would yell on the last lap, "Use your arms"! It did help. If you can move your arms faster, the legs will follow.
    One problem with this strategy is that it could cause athletes to become more tense. This might be more detrimental compared to the perceived gains? I think this is what mojo's better half is saying above too.
    Wow, you right! My stupid coach was the only thing stopping me from breaking 4 for the mile. :x

    Leave a comment:


  • Daisy
    replied
    Originally posted by SQUACKEE
    My coach would yell on the last lap, "Use your arms"! It did help. If you can move your arms faster, the legs will follow.
    One problem with this strategy is that it could cause athletes to become more tense. This might be more detrimental compared to the perceived gains? I think this is what mojo's better half is saying above too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Speedfirst
    replied
    Originally posted by SQUACKEE
    My coach would yell on the last lap, "Use your arms"! It did help. If you can move your arms faster, the legs will follow.
    That's not what you want at the end of the 100m, legs going faster, now you're decelerating faster. I assume you're talking last lap of the 400m. Using your arms in the last lap of the 400m, helps you with your cadence, with your energy distribution. Some sprinters, use their arms more at the 250m mark. You can see them with their arms higher on the 1st 200m and then again 250 and going in, lower the arms.

    Leave a comment:


  • SQUACKEE
    replied
    My coach would yell on the last lap, "Use your arms"! It did help. If you can move your arms faster, the legs will follow.

    Leave a comment:


  • Speedfirst
    replied
    Originally posted by imaginative
    While I do not have the knowledge to judge the fine details,
    I would like to suggest an experiment: Put your hands in
    your pockets and go for a brisk walk (or run if you prefer).
    Then just remove hands from pockets and let your arms
    swing naturally. Observe the difference.
    That's the balance aspect of it.

    Leave a comment:


  • imaginative
    replied
    While I do not have the knowledge to judge the fine details,
    I would like to suggest an experiment: Put your hands in
    your pockets and go for a brisk walk (or run if you prefer).
    Then just remove hands from pockets and let your arms
    swing naturally. Observe the difference.

    Leave a comment:


  • mojo
    replied
    I used to tell athletes to just think about their arms when they tire n the homestrecth in say a 400.

    DH now tells me that is wrong (or at least not effective).
    He instructs athletes to think more about keeping the rthymn and turn over going. Slight difference I guess.

    Anyway I agree with all who say arm action should only be changed if it is dramatically affecting an athletes performance. It doesn't have to look pretty to get the job done.

    I know a few coaches who are all about what their athletes look like when they run. They spend so much time on running technique that the athletes aren't doing the hard fitness work.

    Also- running in slow motion to fix any running fault is a complete waste of time-it does not transfer to running at speed.


    Hell I can look good doing slow motion A and Bs.


    To learn to run well fast you must run fast.

    Leave a comment:

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