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  • rainy.here
    replied
    Originally posted by JRM

    What is the origin of the oscillations in the LAVEG data? Is this limb movement (arms, legs)?
    I believe the jerkiness is due to his body getting jerked around as his legs interact with the ground.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pierre-Jean
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by malmo
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by Daisy
    Interesting how Bolt seems to have a little rest between 45 and 55m in his 100m final where the power for each stride seems to be less.
    Where are you seeing 5m data?
    http://tinyurl.com/p2phka
    Thanks. Are are they interpolating the 10m split data? - sure doesn't look like it.
    10m split data are interpolated from the curve drawn by the laser.
    You'll find up to 0.02 diff with the camera timings.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by malmo
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by Daisy
    Interesting how Bolt seems to have a little rest between 45 and 55m in his 100m final where the power for each stride seems to be less.
    Where are you seeing 5m data?
    http://tinyurl.com/p2phka
    Thanks. Are are they interpolating the 10m split data? - sure doesn't look like it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pierre-Jean
    replied
    Originally posted by bhall
    Pierre-Jean- Would you mind answering gh's question directly since not all all of us (me included) are familiar with the methodology from Stuttgart? Or is there a link where it can be found?
    Markers are placed on the track.
    Cameras are placed on upper crowds and aligned with those markers.

    Scheme of the set-up :



    The only diff is that in Stuttgart, the times were taken at 30m, 60m and 80m while in Berlin they were taken at 20m, 40m, 60m and 80m.

    Leave a comment:


  • malmo
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by Daisy
    Interesting how Bolt seems to have a little rest between 45 and 55m in his 100m final where the power for each stride seems to be less.
    Where are you seeing 5m data?
    http://tinyurl.com/p2phka

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by Daisy
    Interesting how Bolt seems to have a little rest between 45 and 55m in his 100m final where the power for each stride seems to be less.
    Where are you seeing 5m data?

    Leave a comment:


  • Daisy
    replied
    Interesting how Bolt seems to have a little rest between 45 and 55m in his 100m final where the power for each stride seems to be less.

    Leave a comment:


  • malmo
    replied
    Originally posted by JRM
    Originally posted by RamGoat
    The squiggly line is Bolt's actual speed.

    You push off with your legs.. and the air resistance and landing slows you down. So the speed is oscillating as it rises to the 65m mark. That is why his MAX speed is more than the 10m distance divided by the split.
    Air resistance is constant.

    With each [edit] drive phase the torso lurches forward, with each flight/landing the torso jerks backwards. Since the data comes from sensitive laser speed devices, the graph is exactly what one should expect to see.

    Leave a comment:


  • bhall
    replied
    Pierre-Jean- Would you mind answering gh's question directly since not all all of us (me included) are familiar with the methodology from Stuttgart? Or is there a link where it can be found?

    Leave a comment:


  • Pierre-Jean
    replied
    Originally posted by gh
    Originally posted by Pierre-Jean
    20m split were found via camera aligned with marks on the track. The cameras are linked with the Seiko equipement so they can have accurate and synchronised time code. Laser (blue line) is placed either behind or in front of a single runner, at about 1m-1m20 height. I would rely more on the camera data because it takes the times from the torso, like the final time on photofinish.
    The 0.01-0.02 diff between the 2 methodology confirms what was found in Athens'97.
    Any idea if the 100m splits in the 400s (and 200) are high-speed stuff (usable in 100ths), or interpolations from normal video (only usable in 10ths)?
    Same methodology as for aligned and Seiko-syncronised camera. Same research theam and method as in Stuttgart'93.
    The university in charge of sprint event biomec analysis is not the same as throws and jumps, those events required 3D analysis and thus more time to analyse data..

    Leave a comment:


  • Frans Rutten
    replied
    Originally posted by Stafanitus
    thanks a lot for the link.
    can anybody help to find the jumps-datas.
    greetings.
    I don't think a biomechanical analysis of jumps is involved, if I understand you correctly. Otherwise please look at the wonderful results pages of IAAF.

    But as far as the other data are concerned.

    Their website www.fgs.uni-halle.de clearly states, that the IAAF website will only provide a part of their plain results. On their website the 4x100m and 4x400m results are not yet linkable, maybe not for a while. The full report will be sent to the IAAF by november.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stafanitus
    replied
    thanks a lot for the link.
    can anybody help to find the jumps-datas.
    greetings.

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Originally posted by Pierre-Jean
    20m split were found via camera aligned with marks on the track. The cameras are linked with the Seiko equipement so they can have accurate and synchronised time code. Laser (blue line) is placed either behind or in front of a single runner, at about 1m-1m20 height. I would rely more on the camera data because it takes the times from the torso, like the final time on photofinish.
    The 0.01-0.02 diff between the 2 methodology confirms what was found in Athens'97.
    Any idea if the 100m splits in the 400s (and 200) are high-speed stuff (usable in 100ths), or interpolations from normal video (only usable in 10ths)?

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    This perhaps a better link

    http://berlin.iaaf.org/records/biomechanics/index.html

    Leave a comment:


  • JRM
    replied
    Originally posted by RamGoat
    The squiggly line is Bolt's actual speed.

    You push off with your legs.. and the air resistance and landing slows you down. So the speed is oscillating as it rises to the 65m mark. That is why his MAX speed is more than the 10m distance divided by the split.

    The smoothed line is bolts AVERAGED SPEED.
    Air resistance certainly wouldn't slow anyone down by 2m/s in the space of a stride (cf. 13 to 11m/s at 40m). I'm sure it's 99.9% landing.

    I still think there must be extra noise to that graph, though. If what you say is true, Bolt's peak instantaneous speed was over 13m/s at about 54m (and was 13m/s at 40m, as mentioned above). Perhaps that's just the reality of the data, though, which in itself is very interesting.

    Leave a comment:

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