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Baton Passing 101

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  • lonewolf
    replied
    Originally posted by tracknut
    timing a rolling start with the incoming runner. .
    Thats the phrase I was looking for..

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by tracknut
    The French never actully slowed down. In a national publication they revealed their" secret" which was timing a rolling start with the incoming runner. Our problem is we get a new national coach every season whereas the other countries have a desigated national coach (French, USSR, Cuba, Japan) I can't say the same for T & T but look how well they progressed in the last three seasons.
    The ideal situation is the Trinidad men and Bahamian women, when you have exactly four or five elite sprinters in the whole country. In these situations, there is no politics when it comes to chooing the team, because there is such a huge dropoff when you go to the fifth or sixth sprinter. The Bahamian team that won the gold medal in 2000 was comprised of the only four elite sprinters they had, and they got to run together for several years going all the way back to the 1996 Olympics. Politics only comes into play when you have countries like Jamaica and the U.S. who each have eight to ten elite sprinters to chose from.

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  • tracknut
    replied
    The French never actully slowed down. In a national publication they revealed their" secret" which was timing a rolling start with the incoming runner. Our problem is we get a new national coach every season whereas the other countries have a desigated national coach (French, USSR, Cuba, Japan) I can't say the same for T & T but look how well they progressed in the last three seasons.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Re: baton passing 101

    Originally posted by lonewolf
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    [Now I understand. But I must point out that whenever the baton has to be passed across the lane as you've describe, then either one or both of the runners are out of place. .
    Nope, I'm saying something wrong. That is my point. If runners are on the correct side of the lane and the pass is always from near (inside) hand to near hand), left to right or right to left, it will never be passed across the lane or across a body.
    Exactly! I think Alexandria Anderson may have started to drift to the inside of the lane as she approached Muna Lee and that caused Lee to have to contort her body the way she did.

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  • lonewolf
    replied
    Re: baton passing 101

    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    [Now I understand. But I must point out that whenever the baton has to be passed across the lane as you've describe, then either one or both of the runners are out of place. .
    Nope, I'm saying something wrong. That is my point. If runners are on the correct side of the lane and the pass is always from near (inside) hand to near hand), left to right or right to left, it will never be passed across the lane or across a body.

    Leave a comment:


  • Speedfirst
    replied
    I truly don't believe it's about the type of exchange the U.S. uses that has been their issue. If you don't practice enough with those individuals who actually are gonna run the relay (round & finals), doesn't matter what type of exchange you have, you're probably gonna get the same results.

    The definition of insanity is expecting different results, yet doing things the same.

    Leave a comment:


  • wineturtle
    replied
    When was the flyzone first used in the 4x100m(4x110y)?

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  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Re: baton passing 101

    Originally posted by scratchman
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    Originally posted by lonewolf
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    Originally posted by lonewolf
    What makes me cringe is right to left, or vice versa, from wrong side of lane with outgoing running looking back with body contorted doing the windshield wiper.
    I'm in 100% agreement with Rusty, but I still don't know what you mean when you say right to left and left to right makes you cringe? .
    I thought I said somewhere in there the problem is when they are on the wrong side of the lane passing across two bodies, easily prevented if both runners are on the same page. I should have said from far hand to far hand instead of right to left or vice versa. I have no argument with your system. As I said, I would tailor exchanges to the preferred receiving/carrying hand of each leg, so far as possible and practical.
    I think the most important thing is to use the upsweep pass which, IMO, is the superior delivery and gets outgoing off and running in the right direction quicker.
    Now I understand. But I must point out that whenever the baton has to be passed across the lane as you've describe, then either one or both of the runners are out of place. This happened in 2004 in Athens when Coby Miller ran the second leg on the inside of lane instead of the outsside of the lane, and consequently, the U.S. lost a lot of ground to the other teams when he made the exchange to Justion Gatlin.
    You mean Gatlin on second. Miller was third leg.
    You're right, I had it switched around. Miller ran on the outside of the lane when he should have been on the inside of the lane. This made it very difficult for Gatlin to get the stick to him across his body.

    Leave a comment:


  • scratchman
    replied
    Re: baton passing 101

    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    Originally posted by lonewolf
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    Originally posted by lonewolf
    What makes me cringe is right to left, or vice versa, from wrong side of lane with outgoing running looking back with body contorted doing the windshield wiper.
    I'm in 100% agreement with Rusty, but I still don't know what you mean when you say right to left and left to right makes you cringe? .
    I thought I said somewhere in there the problem is when they are on the wrong side of the lane passing across two bodies, easily prevented if both runners are on the same page. I should have said from far hand to far hand instead of right to left or vice versa. I have no argument with your system. As I said, I would tailor exchanges to the preferred receiving/carrying hand of each leg, so far as possible and practical.
    I think the most important thing is to use the upsweep pass which, IMO, is the superior delivery and gets outgoing off and running in the right direction quicker.
    Now I understand. But I must point out that whenever the baton has to be passed across the lane as you've describe, then either one or both of the runners are out of place. This happened in 2004 in Athens when Coby Miller ran the second leg on the inside of lane instead of the outsside of the lane, and consequently, the U.S. lost a lot of ground to the other teams when he made the exchange to Justion Gatlin.
    You mean Gatlin on second. Miller was third leg.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Re: baton passing 101

    Originally posted by lonewolf
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    Originally posted by lonewolf
    What makes me cringe is right to left, or vice versa, from wrong side of lane with outgoing running looking back with body contorted doing the windshield wiper.
    I'm in 100% agreement with Rusty, but I still don't know what you mean when you say right to left and left to right makes you cringe? .
    I thought I said somewhere in there the problem is when they are on the wrong side of the lane passing across two bodies, easily prevented if both runners are on the same page. I should have said from far hand to far hand instead of right to left or vice versa. I have no argument with your system. As I said, I would tailor exchanges to the preferred receiving/carrying hand of each leg, so far as possible and practical.
    I think the most important thing is to use the upsweep pass which, IMO, is the superior delivery and gets outgoing off and running in the right direction quicker.
    Now I understand. But I must point out that whenever the baton has to be passed across the lane as you've describe, then either one or both of the runners are out of place. This happened in 2004 in Athens when Coby Miller ran the second leg on the inside of lane instead of the outsside of the lane, and consequently, the U.S. lost a lot of ground to the other teams when he made the exchange to Justion Gatlin.

    Leave a comment:


  • lonewolf
    replied
    Relayings a bitch, ain't it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Per Andersen
    replied
    Re: baton passing 101

    Originally posted by Rustyjaguar
    Some good points. however, you want your leadoff to run to the inside of the lane with the baton in their right hand. The 2nd leg runner will run to the outside of their lane a little to receive the baton in the left hand. Do not switch hands ever. Too much risks. The reason the 2nd and anchor legs run to the outside alittle gives the leadoff and 3rd legs a little room in case the first pass is missed and they won't trip over each other aka Anderson and Muna. Leadoff right hand /inside lane . 2nd left hand / outer part of lane. 3rd right hand / inside of lane. Anchor left hand/ outer part of lane. Never teach switching baton. Too many risks.
    There is also a risk involved in NOT switching hands. After the first exchange there will often be a shorter and shorter piece of the baton to grab onto for the outgoing runner.

    Leave a comment:


  • lonewolf
    replied
    Re: baton passing 101

    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    Originally posted by lonewolf
    What makes me cringe is right to left, or vice versa, from wrong side of lane with outgoing running looking back with body contorted doing the windshield wiper.
    I'm in 100% agreement with Rusty, but I still don't know what you mean when you say right to left and left to right makes you cringe? .
    I thought I said somewhere in there the problem is when they are on the wrong side of the lane passing across two bodies, easily prevented if both runners are on the same page. I should have said from far hand to far hand instead of right to left or vice versa. I have no argument with your system. As I said, I would tailor exchanges to the preferred receiving/carrying hand of each leg, so far as possible and practical.
    I think the most important thing is to use the upsweep pass which, IMO, is the superior delivery and gets outgoing off and running in the right direction quicker.

    Leave a comment:


  • smithg
    replied
    ok so i didnt read all the posts, but if this is "101", I was taught in Jr. High on the 4x100 never put your hand back until you are sure you are in the zone (doc patton). if the guy runs you over, you didnt take off soon enough and are going to flub it anyway. now... if you take off too soon, youll be out of the zone before he gets there. Its not an exact science but the error made by the men was pretty riduculus when you apply thie "101" principle

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Henry
    replied
    "In relay races of 4x100m and 4x200m, members of a team other
    than the first athlete may commence running not more than 10m
    outside the take-over zone (see Rule 170.2). A distinctive mark shall
    be made in each lane to denote this extended limit."

    "Each take-over zone shall be 20m long of which the scratch line is
    the centre. The zones shall start and finish at the edges of the zone
    lines nearest the start line in the running direction." IAAF RULE 170
    Should have Known better... you are 100% right Jazzy. Should have qouted it the way you said it but a closing Bolt is a hard Missile to hit.

    But Crawford and Patton as pros forgot as well, so I can't be too hard on myself.

    Leave a comment:

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