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'09 Brussels m110H

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  • '09 Brussels m110H

    Lane Athlete Nation PB SB
    1 FAULK, Dexter USA 13.13 13.13
    2 SVOBODA, Petr CZE 13.29 13.33
    3 OLIVER, David USA 12.95 13.09
    4 THOMAS, Dwight JAM 13.16 13.16
    5 BRATHWAITE, Ryan BAR 13.14 13.14
    6 SHARMAN, William GBR 13.30 13.30
    7 BROWN, Joel USA 13.22 13.27
    8 NOGA, Artur POL 13.34 13.43
    9 BROOTHAERTS, Damien BEL 13.62 13.62

  • #2
    Oliver non-starter
    Regards,
    toyracer

    Comment


    • #3
      I guess that will add quite a bit to Brathwaite's spot in the rankings at the end of the year.

      Comment


      • #4
        Wind:-1.3
        Rank Athlete Nat Result React.time
        1 BRATHWAITE, Ryan BAR 13.30 0.199
        2 THOMAS, Dwight JAM 13.38 0.202
        3 BROWN, Joel USA 13.39 0.175
        4 SHARMAN, William GBR 13.39 0.168
        5 SVOBODA, Petr CZE 13.47 0.191
        6 NOGA, Artur POL 13.48 0.196
        7 FAULK, Dexter USA 13.50 0.180
        8 BROOTHAERTS, Damien BEL 13.79 0.199
        OLIVER, David USA DNS

        personal note; Thomas needs a faster overall start, but he looks really good in the last third of his races.
        Regards,
        toyracer

        Comment


        • #5
          When Thomas fix that start he will be a killer in the 110mH

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by JROCK
            When Thomas fix that start he will be a killer in the 110mH
            Didn't he come from the 100; if so, why is his start weak?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 26mi235
              Originally posted by JROCK
              When Thomas fix that start he will be a killer in the 110mH
              Didn't he come from the 100; if so, why is his start weak?
              Making that adjustment from the flat start, now to a start where you have to pick up the hurdle.
              on the road

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 26mi235
                Originally posted by JROCK
                When Thomas fix that start he will be a killer in the 110mH
                Didn't he come from the 100; if so, why is his start weak?
                Starting in the 100m and the 110mH are very different. There is no driving in the 110mH, its all about getting up and into your running as fast as possible so u can react well to the hurdles coming at you, while in the flat 100m some athletes (like SAF and Asafa for instance) achieve far more by driving out of the blocks.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks. The start in the marathon is not nearly so crucial, so I am not as well versed here. :wink:

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    To specify further, most good 100m sprinters (Thomas, with a 10.00 pb qualifies under my definition ) maintain a pronounced forward lean that mostly levels off by 30m. Their head is very often still down at this point (obviously dependent on the individual when they look up), but their body position is such that hurdling would be a non-issue if they were hurdlers. By the time a 100m sprinter reaches the first hurdle (13.72m or 45 feet away), they would still be leaning forward so much that hurdling it would require a slight jump and extreme flexibility. The jumping slows them down significantly, so in order to navigate the hurdles most efficiently, they have to be almost fully upright by the first hurdle is reached.

                    This adds a few complications:

                    -He needs to adopt a different acceleration position, which might take time to adjust to.
                    -He needs to ensure his strides are the same length every time. His natural stride pattern will have either slightly longer or slightly shorter steps, and it will take time to adjust to this new running style, not only leading up to the first hurdle, but also between the hurdles. If you watch Dayron Robles hurdle, he takes very short choppy steps between the hurdles because he is tall and has a stride length that would naturally be much longer. This forced stride pattern also means that there are two ways to lower your time. The first is to become more efficient over the hurdles, and the second is to increase your stride frequency. 100m sprinters can increase either or both of their stride frequency and stride length, but you can't do this for the sticks.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I hope D.O. is okay.
                      The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TrackDaddy
                        I hope D.O. is okay.
                        I don't think he is: http://davidoliverhurdles.blogspot.com/

                        Think it's same injury that ruled him out of the rest of the season.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by rainy.here
                          To specify further, most good 100m sprinters (Thomas, with a 10.00 pb qualifies under my definition ) maintain a pronounced forward lean that mostly levels off by 30m. Their head is very often still down at this point (obviously dependent on the individual when they look up), but their body position is such that hurdling would be a non-issue if they were hurdlers. By the time a 100m sprinter reaches the first hurdle (13.72m or 45 feet away), they would still be leaning forward so much that hurdling it would require a slight jump and extreme flexibility. The jumping slows them down significantly, so in order to navigate the hurdles most efficiently, they have to be almost fully upright by the first hurdle is reached.

                          This adds a few complications:

                          -He needs to adopt a different acceleration position, which might take time to adjust to.
                          -He needs to ensure his strides are the same length every time. His natural stride pattern will have either slightly longer or slightly shorter steps, and it will take time to adjust to this new running style, not only leading up to the first hurdle, but also between the hurdles. If you watch Dayron Robles hurdle, he takes very short choppy steps between the hurdles because he is tall and has a stride length that would naturally be much longer. This forced stride pattern also means that there are two ways to lower your time. The first is to become more efficient over the hurdles, and the second is to increase your stride frequency. 100m sprinters can increase either or both of their stride frequency and stride length, but you can't do this for the sticks.
                          Excellent post.
                          I used to run the 400 and the sprint hurdles in high school and one of the biggest problems my coach had was the fact that my stride length gets out of whack when am pressured (in the print hurdles) and I start overstriding and hit hurdles. Another thing about hurdles.... confidence and practice are your BEST friend. Ohh.... and hurdlers meet up so much in the season not out of convenience... but because they kinda have to.

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