Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

As trackfans we have to do better

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • As trackfans we have to do better

    I was a member of the Oregon list long ago and I got in some special arguments, mainly about the biased opinions of many of the fans in regards to sprints.

    Look the track underworld, better known as message boards, has exploded thanks to the upswing in sprint times and the 10.67 run by Jeter. Sadly it has brought back the same ill feelings I once expressed on the Oregon list. A sprinter runs something special and it is immediately a drug question. Many of you have gone so far as to say you have a bad taste in your mouth and you just cannot get excited about it. My question is why? Do you feel the same when 8 africans run under 13 minutes? Or when the marathoners now run 2:08 and faster as if that is completely normal? I do not see mile long threads about the drop in 1500 times recently, I mean when is the last time we have seen a sub 3:30?
    My point is to not slander the distance runners but to bring to all of your attention to the clear bias you hold against the sprints in general. There have been drug bust up and down the line of our sport and it is something we have to get a handle on, on many fronts, but we will not survive if the truest of us continually question the marquee performances, and speak about them as if it is an unquestioned truth that these men and women are doping.
    When we hash it out is it so remarkable that she ran 10.67? I am old enough to remember cheering for Evelyn when she beat Gohr at Zurich in a wr 10.76. That was well over 20 years ago fellas. Are we to be astounded by a tenth improvement by the women in 25 years?
    We have to get excited about this sport or no one else will. I admire GH and staff because while the board may get out of control they have maintained a level in the magazine throughout it all. However, I know some of you also post here and talk in the stands, and you have to realize your internal doubts that you do not write, thank you, still shows in your lack of enthusiasm in what you do write.
    We have our pitfalls and I am asking us all the be optimist and allow for disappointment. We are killing ourselves in an attempt to not be disappointed in our heroes. Well hell guys it is a little late for that now. I can tell you with full confidence this performance did not fall out of the sky, it has been there waiting all year. Her season is a result of hard nosed work and a dedication to a training program that has produced the best we have ever seen over a long time period. This is not a mystery any longer. At some point we have to look up and acknowledge that some of our coaches are just that good. The same we respect many many distance coaches.
    That race was something special, in terms of execution it was all it was supposed to be, it was a masterful run. If you take the time to look you will see technical improvements, and spot on mechanics that are supposed to produce said performance.
    Some of you will never believe and I can appreciate that, there is a lot of reason to disbelieve, but we need that number to shrink, especially where sprints are concerned. They are our superstars and are the face of the sport, like it or not. Get excited fellas, we are in a special time for sprinters right now, just as we were for middle distance for a while.
    Sincerely from the ground up.
    This is my public service announcement.

  • #2
    I am one who defends athletes all the time. I have many people tell me that some of my fav athletes were cheaters even though they have never tested postive for anything and I defend them to the hilt.
    I have no idea who is on PEDs and who isn't. Until someone tests positive none of can say anything definitive.
    Everything might be just fine these days and every remarkable performance could very well be legit BUT:

    We who love the sport and have been bitterly disappointed in the past have every right to remain on guard if that is how we feel. Might not be fair and the athletes who have severely tarnished the sport in the past may be to blame but that is the way it is.



    I will say that technically Jeter's race was as close to perfection as one can get.

    And I also very much appreciate your love for the sport and your contribution and enthusiasm.

    Comment


    • #3
      mojo I am just like you, and I acknowledge the skepticism. Hell I work to make people question what they see. It is a twist on the negativity but a way to use the energy as a positive. I tell the athletes I coach go out and do something to make them accuse you of being dirty. Until you have done that you have not reached the upper echelon of the sport. So I am not saying to anyone ignore the history, or to not be on guard. I am saying be mindful of how much energy we give to the darkness, like anything else in life it will sneak up and become your voice. And as a collective it has become our voice and the voice of the general public. We have to lead this train and change the perception out there.
      I mean it is not just drugs, it is a general way we handle and deal with ourselves as a profession. Look at this mess with Semenya. The IAAF dropped the ball and owes this young lady a huge apology. but we have become a culture of leaks and know it alls, and damn the people it affects.

      And thank you

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't coach athlete anywhere near the top echelons of the sport and probably never will.
        Some times I regret that and other days I feel quite content being at the bottom of the ladder and enjoying the purity and fun of it all.

        It is sad that every great performance gets questioned-I do try and resist the temptation myself.

        Comment


        • #5
          My initial reaction when the race finished was to say to myself, "Man, Jeter just ran her perfect race!" That was a thing of technical beauty, and a long time coming. The signs were there all year that she was ready to run REALLY fast at some point.

          Comment


          • #6
            I think deep downinside it passes the doping issue and an issue of rights to the throne. I believe many track fans would have felt more comfortable with Lauryn, Veronica, Debbie, Sherone, Kerron or perhaps Shelly getting there first.

            I think many are just upset whether grudgingly or otherwise that it wasn't one of the event's bests (from history of performances) to get the cheese. Much like Atkins is sort of vilified for having finished ahead of Powell in Asafa (I mean, who is he to be beating Asafa at the Worlds)

            I think for them process it, they first have to bash her a bit for not being in the top girl ilks. Face it Smoke, this has thrown out track fans equilibrium.

            Comment


            • #7
              Pelpa that is an interesting perspective. I did not think about it that way but you could be right.

              Comment


              • #8
                There are skeptical fans because there has been abuse by athletes. Need I say
                more?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Just the facts -

                  Carmelita Jeter

                  2006 Age 26 100m PR 11.48

                  2009 Age 29 100m PR 10.67
                  There are no strings on me

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    To the original point....the sport spends an awful lot of time pointing out what did happen didn't and what didn't happen did.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by guru
                      Just the facts -

                      Carmelita Jeter

                      2006 Age 26 100m PR 11.48

                      2009 Age 29 100m PR 10.67
                      Just the facts:

                      Kerron Stewart: 11.46, 11.34, 11.40, 11.91.....11.01

                      Donovan Bailey: Age 23: 10.42, Age 24: 10.42 Age 25: 10.36 Age 28: 9.84

                      What's your point???

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Rye Catcher
                        There are skeptical fans because there has been abuse by athletes. Need I say
                        more?
                        There has been abuse by sprinters and distance runners. The point is that fans primarily seem to be skeptical concerning breakout times by sprinters.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jeremyp
                          Originally posted by guru
                          Just the facts -

                          Carmelita Jeter

                          2006 Age 26 100m PR 11.48

                          2009 Age 29 100m PR 10.67
                          Just the facts:

                          Kerron Stewart: 11.46, 11.34, 11.40, 11.91.....11.01

                          Donovan Bailey: Age 23: 10.42, Age 24: 10.42 Age 25: 10.36 Age 28: 9.84

                          More valuable well researched facts. Thank you Jeremy.
                          There are no strings on me

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Excellent points Guru and jeremyp.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thank you Ed.
                              There are no strings on me

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X