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What happens with Caster Semenya and the medal?

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  • What happens with Caster Semenya and the medal?

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2009/se ... ender-test

    So, what happens with the 800 medal? Does M(s/r) Caster get to keep it?

  • #2
    I believe Nov 21 is the date the IAAF has said they'll have a response.

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    • #3
      I can NOT believe they'll take hers away. They may award a new G-S-B.

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      • #4
        Well nothing has been reported yet on the results, so everything is rumor at this point. If they do in fact take the medal it will be because there was a conspiracy involved, which obviously was not the case, so from my point of view the medal is not in question at all.

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        • #5
          Whether she"keeps her medal" is a minor issue. What counts is whose name is written in the book. Let her have it. Not too tough to cast a new Gold, and for the current Silver and Bronze holders to pass theirs down the line. Let her physically keep it. No big deal.

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          • #6
            from the same paper a week ago:

            <<"This is a medical issue and not a doping issue where she was deliberately cheating," IAAF spokesman Nick Davies was quoted as saying by the newspaper. "These tests do not suggest any suspicion of deliberate misconduct but seek to assess the possibility of a potential medical condition which would give Semenya an unfair advantage over her competitors. There is no automatic disqualification of results in a case like this."

            The IAAF has said Semenya probably would keep her medal because the case was not related to a doping matter.>

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            • #7
              Caster may be innocent, but Chuene is looking very dodgy!

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              • #8
                This is simply a case of the IAAF not paying attention to the details. It is a top down issue. They allowed all those leaks through the last ten years, including the one the brought the Balco case to light. But they thought the ends justified the means not realizing it was a huge problem and shows institutional ineptitude and carelessness. Well not what! Are we going to allow then to scapegoat the ASA? The ASA was following protocol. But this time the pain is not justified to said athlete and it is becoming an international issue due to the delicate nature of the gender issue.

                What a mess. I am more embarrassed by this than any drug case. This shows a callousness for personal privacy and professional courtesy. We look uncaring, and amatuerish.

                Sorry for the rant but I really believe the sport will continue to see these types of problems as long as the international governing body operates in a semi professional matter steeped in amateur mindsets. We have to raise our game folks, we have to demand more from those in charge and in turn from ourselves out here.

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                • #9
                  ASA was following protocol? Only if you call ignoring medical evidence protocol!

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                  • #10
                    What hasn't been mentioned it all of this mess, is that, without Caster being in the race, it would have been a different race with - very probably - a different result in the placings. For example, Krevsun went out to win that race, She went out to beat Caster! Jenny Meadows ran for a medal. Without Caster in the race, I'd have bet on Krevsun winning a medal - if not the gold. Let's have some tears for Yuliya.

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                    • #11
                      Actually some people in ASA did follow protocol, but as new story on front page notes (in calling for Chuene's head, Chuene did not:

                      <<It has been revealed that, despite his denials, Chuene knew all along Semenya had undergone sex tests in South Africa before flying to Berlin to compete in last month's IAAF World Championships.>>

                      You can be mad at IAAF for "insensitivity" (and they have admitted as much), but the whole thing starts with ASA not following the rules.

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                      • #12
                        The IAAF should be ashamed of themselves, in this instance and a few others in Berlin and prior to it.
                        on the road

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                        • #13
                          gh what I mean by protocol is semi transparency. What I mean is iffy decision making. What I mean is denial in the face of the truth (I give Chuene credit for owning up to his responsibility). It was "hyperbole" I know, but the entire episode just looks too familiar. The only difference here for people is the fact that we are talking about a gender issue rather than say drugs, where many feel "by any means necessary" is ok because it seems as though it is a just cause.

                          Chuene made a judgement call and it was a bad call. But I can appreciate his dilemma in such a unique and sensitive situation. WHat I am looking at is how do we ignore the fact that the IAAF had no hand in this? Let me get this right, they were aware enough to intervene in the Jamaican situation but had no clue the fastest runner, who happened to be a junior, who happened to just run an astounding time, had a gender test administered and in process? gh I understand what you are saying and honestly I do not disagree. However I am continually left grasping for a foot hold on the leadership of the sport and where we are being led. ASA screwed up and it is their burden to sort out, the IAAF as the overseer has to show me leadership and guidance. Letting ASA take all the heat is business as usual and does not solve the issue for the international community. We will see the same thing happen in the UK, CAN, BRA, the US, wherever at this rate.
                          I think we are sloppy from the top down and it shows in times of crisis, as anything in life. IMO

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                          • #14
                            The primary blame here rest solely on ASA's shoulders.

                            As hjsteve said above, I'm completely fine with Semenya being allowed to keep the medal. However, nothing else should stand: the race results need to be officially changed, and Semenya needs to be banned from henceforth competing as a woman.

                            These results would NOT be taken to reflect or imply that Semenya was personally dishonest in any way. As I've said before, it's simply the fact that Semenya doesn't fit sport's binary-box structure. To allow intersex individuals (with elevated testosterone levels, etc.) to compete as women would make a mockery of the category ("woman") itself--a category that functions perfectly well in (I'm guessing here) 99,999 of 100,000 cases. Social constructivism has nothing to do with this case; it rests strictly on the hard facts of biology.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Smoke
                              Chuene made a judgement call and it was a bad call.
                              This is it. Everything beyond this statement would be a spin of some kind. I'd hold Chuene fully personally responsible for the entire mess.
                              "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                              by Thomas Henry Huxley

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