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Is The 800m a Sprint?

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  • lonewolf
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    I don't always agree with kuha but he got this one right.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    OK, Price-Waterhouse just handed me the envelope.

    3rd best answer
    Originally posted by gibson
    is a zebra black or white?
    it is both.
    2nd best answer:
    Originally posted by JRM
    In my opinion (and perhaps this is a formal definition), a sprint is a race that relies on anaerobic exertion.
    And the winning answer is:
    Originally posted by kuha
    This tread is about nothing but minutia, hair-splitting, and semantic bobbing and weaving.

    Leave a comment:


  • repmujhgih
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    So should races be labeled as following:

    60m Sprint
    100m Sprint
    200m Dash
    400m Dash
    800m Dash/Run - argument could be made here and is sometimes a race by race distinction.
    1500m+ Run

    Making a distinction between the 3 styles of running; Sprint, dash, run.

    Sprint - very little conservation of energy
    Dash - Large percentage of race is a Sprint, but conservation of energy used depending on athlete's abilities and strengths.
    Run - Tactical race where energy conservation is a predominate focus in how the race is ran.

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    Originally posted by repmujhgih
    Ato Boldon said on twitter that a sprint is defined by the use of blocks. No blocks, not a sprint.
    Considering every race up to 800 uses blocks, it is a definition as useful as mud.

    Leave a comment:


  • repmujhgih
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    Ato Boldon said on twitter that a sprint is defined by the use of blocks. No blocks, not a sprint.

    Leave a comment:


  • gibson
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    However, if you define sprinting as running without an any attempt to conserve energy or pace yourself, then the 200-meter dash is the longest sprint
    sounds like a fine definition to me.

    other definitions are:
    websters.
    SPRINT : to run or go at top speed especially for a short distance
    Middle English (Scots) sprenten to spring, leap, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Swedish dialect sprinta to jump, hop; akin to Old High German sprinzan to jump up. First Known Use: 1889
    oxsford
    SPRINT :the competitive athletic sport of running distances of 400 metres or less:
    dictionary.reference.com
    to race or move at full speed, especially for a short distance, as in running, rowing, etc.
    livestrong...
    SPRINT :Sprinting is generally defined as a type of run that occurs at or near full speed. According to D. G. a. Lowe in his book "Athletics," full speed can only be maintained for about 20m. After 80m momentum slows. A true sprinting pace, on the other hand, can be maintained for distances up to 300 or 400m, as long as you are running at approximately 90 to 100 percent of your measured top speed. This is a speed often achieved in sprint drills.

    Sprint Speeds
    There is no formal definition of sprint speed because everybody has his own pace. The world record holder for the 100m, Usain Bolt, ran an average of 23.35 mph over 9.58 seconds. If a person ran the 100m in 15 seconds, that would be an average of 15 mph. In the 400m Michael Johnson holds the world record of 43.18 seconds, which is 20.71 mph. These are all sprint speeds.
    Foot Contact
    Another way to look at sprint speed is the length of time your foot contacts the ground. A reduction in ground contact time allows for an efficient transfer of energy in the direction of the movement and thus more explosive power. The foot of an elite athlete makes contact with the ground every 0.08 to 0.10 seconds. For everybody else the foot should make contact in less than 0.20 seconds.
    Technique
    This efficient use of energy must be accompanied by a change in posture. Sprinters need to be erect and relaxed. Stride length should start out around 50 to 60cm at the beginning of a sprint and increase to more than 2m. The push has to come from the extended rear leg with a high forward knee drive. Sprinters use a type of muscle called fast twitch fiber, which quickly burns energy and allows for explosive power.
    Improvement
    In order to improve your speed, first focus on overall health and good technique to ensure that you are at your physical peak. Your exercises should consist of sprint training combined with plyometric training--a system of exercise in which muscles are quickly stretched and contracted. Plyometric exercises include bounding, hopping and depth jumps from low heights, which all speed up ground contact times.


    Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/18818 ... z25bu4gnXs

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  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    Originally posted by gibson
    if you accept the definition of sprinting to be running at top speed, then even the 100m is not a pure sprint because humans slow down after 80-90m.
    I guess is you accept that sprinting must be at top speed in the strictist sense of the word "top", there is no such thing as an outdoor sprint. Based on this definition, the longest spint is the 60-meter dash, since no one accelerates past 60 meters. This (6-8 seconds) would coincide with Conor Dary's definition, which is the time that it takes for a sprinter to use up his/her high energy phosphates.

    However, if you define sprinting as running without an any attempt to conserve energy or pace yourself, then the 200-meter dash is the longest sprint, since everyone one paces themselves in the 400, but many (eg. Michael Johnson, Tyson Gay) don't in the 200. Everyone decelerates in the 100 and 200, but the deceleration is involuntary due to the depletion of high energy phosphates, the buildup of lactic acid and the centrifugal forces in the 200. Attempts to maintain this effort for longer than 200 meters results in acidosis/muscle failure, a.k.a "being handed a piano". This (20-25 seconds) would coincide with the defintions of Helen S and myself, which is the time that a person can exert maximum effort without the benefit of aerobic respiration.

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  • kuha
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    Originally posted by gibson
    my personal definition is illustrated by kipkiter below...
    watch the first 200m mad dash of this race http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOS3RQU92Z4 and the last 200 definitely merging to middle distance
    I've probably said it before, but this was one of the greatest races I've ever witnessed. You can hear the crowd absolutely roaring once that other-worldly 48.10 flashed up on the screen; from there to the end everyone was standing and screaming. His surge from 500 to 600 was really impressive and make it seem pretty likely that the record was actually going to go. The "totally-going-for-broke"ness of this performance was just awesome. There were a couple other decent performances that night, too.

    Leave a comment:


  • hc10003
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    Originally posted by lonewolf
    in the 400 you run out of legs before you run out of breath. In the 1500/mile you run out of breath before you run out of legs. In the 800 you run out of both
    Love that definition for its simplicity, and here's another option: we'll know the 800 has become a sprint...when someone uses starting blocks. No blocks = not a sprint.

    Leave a comment:


  • gibson
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    if you accept the definition of sprinting to be running at top speed, then even the 100m is not a pure sprint because humans slow down after 80-90m.

    http://speedendurance.com/2008/08/22/us ... endurance/
    http://myweb.lmu.edu/jmureika/track/splits/splits.html
    http://www.sportsscientists.com/2008/08 ... lysis.html

    interestingly asafa powel (the 80m sprinter) is attributed the fastest last 10m split, which puts into question the accuracy of the splits. but then again, young man powel in 2005 is a different man than in 2008 thru 2012.

    according to wiki, races up to 600m are classified as sprints.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sprint_(running)

    my personal definition is illustrated by kipkiter below...
    watch the first 200m mad dash of this race http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOS3RQU92Z4
    i call the middle 400m hybrid pace
    and the last 200 definitely merging to middle distance

    Leave a comment:


  • j-a-m
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    Originally posted by kuha
    Originally posted by shivfan
    Rudisha seems to treat the 800m like a sprint....
    8-)
    Actually, I'd argue exactly the opposite: he's so in control of himself that he never truly seems to be going all out, which is precisely what sprinting is.
    So when he runs an all-out sub 1:40, you'll finally recognize him as a spinter?

    Leave a comment:


  • j-a-m
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    Originally posted by Conor Dary
    True. The apparent effortlessness of Rudisha, compared with the all out effort of Bolt in the 100.
    Bolt looks quite effortless to me, running away from a world class field, and cruising the last few steps...

    Leave a comment:


  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    Originally posted by kuha
    Originally posted by shivfan
    Rudisha seems to treat the 800m like a sprint....
    8-)
    Actually, I'd argue exactly the opposite: he's so in control of himself that he never truly seems to be going all out, which is precisely what sprinting is.
    True. The apparent effortlessness of Rudisha, compared with the all out effort of Bolt in the 100.

    Leave a comment:


  • kuha
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    Originally posted by shivfan
    Rudisha seems to treat the 800m like a sprint....
    8-)
    Actually, I'd argue exactly the opposite: he's so in control of himself that he never truly seems to be going all out, which is precisely what sprinting is.

    Leave a comment:


  • wineturtle
    replied
    Re: Is The 800m a Sprint?

    dash=sprint=in lanes all the way
    run- not in lanes all the way.
    Indoors in MSG(remember that quaint venue) you ran a 400 m run and outdoors you were in a 400m dash.

    more and more I see a version of running that is a jog, a run and a dash all in one- I call it -- junsh

    jog 11 laps- run one lap dash your ass off 1/2 lap = the 5000m junsh.

    Leave a comment:

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