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  • Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

    • LAS VEGAS — Against a backdrop of confusion, contradiction and controversy, Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez will step into a boxing ring here Saturday night.

      The Nevada State Athletic Commission did not drug test either fighter in the lead-up to the event, saying both were veteran boxers above reproach.


    What a stellar example....makes me weep. I think we should just outsource PED testing to these guys.

    http://www.latimes.com/sports/boxing/la ... 638.column

  • #2
    Re: Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

    Is Nevada a province in Belarus?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

      and the pugilists combined for the one fight will make as much as all the track people in the world combined for a year? Yeah, they're really losing that battle.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

        Originally posted by gh
        and the pugilists combined for the one fight will make as much as all the track people in the world combined for a year? Yeah, they're really losing that battle.
        But it is only money. And fame and pay-for-view, etc. But we have the moralists on our side, such as Phil Hersh.
        • Oh, the joy I will have snubbing Sosa, Bonds and Clemens (plus McGwire and Palmeiro, natch) on my HoF ballot.


        http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/ ... -druggies/

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

          Originally posted by Conor Dary
          The Nevada State Athletic Commission did not drug test either fighter in the lead-up to the event, saying both were veteran boxers above reproach.
          In other words, too many people stood to lose too much money if the fight didn't happen, so they decided against testing.

          Something similar probably happened with Lance Armstrong. The powers that be in cycling must have known what was going on, but he brought so much attention and money to the sport of cycling that they wouldn't dare to catch and ban him. Once he's 40 years old and no longer a contender, it becomes OK to dig up all the damaging evidence against him and remove him from the sport.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

            [quote=18.99s]
            Originally posted by "Conor Dary":1phbq30s
            The Nevada State Athletic Commission did not drug test either fighter in the lead-up to the event, saying both were veteran boxers above reproach.
            In other words, too many people stood to lose too much money if the fight didn't happen, so they decided against testing.

            Something similar probably happened with Lance Armstrong. The powers that be in cycling must have known what was going on, but he brought so much attention and money to the sport of cycling that they wouldn't dare to catch and ban him. Once he's 40 years old and no longer a contender, it becomes OK to dig up all the damaging evidence against him and remove him from the sport.[/quote:1phbq30s]

            Not really back up sufficiently with facts. They did not bother to test either athlete in any manner at all, whereas Armstrong was tested repeatedly, including by people outside the control of UCI.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

              Originally posted by 26mi235
              Not really back up sufficiently with facts. They did not bother to test either athlete in any manner at all, whereas Armstrong was tested repeatedly, including by people outside the control of UCI.
              What I meant was that they didn't dig up the pile of damning evidence (outside of testing) against him until after his career was over.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

                [quote=26mi235]
                Originally posted by 18.99s
                Originally posted by "Conor Dary":2m2ukioz
                The Nevada State Athletic Commission did not drug test either fighter in the lead-up to the event, saying both were veteran boxers above reproach.
                In other words, too many people stood to lose too much money if the fight didn't happen, so they decided against testing.

                Something similar probably happened with Lance Armstrong. The powers that be in cycling must have known what was going on, but he brought so much attention and money to the sport of cycling that they wouldn't dare to catch and ban him. Once he's 40 years old and no longer a contender, it becomes OK to dig up all the damaging evidence against him and remove him from the sport.
                Not really back up sufficiently with facts. They did not bother to test either athlete in any manner at all, whereas Armstrong was tested repeatedly, including by people outside the control of UCI.[/quote:2m2ukioz]

                Right. Armstrong was tested hundreds of times.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

                  Originally posted by 18.99s
                  Originally posted by 26mi235
                  Not really back up sufficiently with facts. They did not bother to test either athlete in any manner at all, whereas Armstrong was tested repeatedly, including by people outside the control of UCI.
                  What I meant was that they didn't dig up the pile of damning evidence (outside of testing) against him until after his career was over.
                  What sport does? But anyways that is another thread which we have beaten to death. The point is the comparison is meaningless.

                  And I started this post as a joke. These two guys could be shooting heroin and no one would really care. Certainly not me.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    85 as the new approach?

                    On the front page it is noted that not a single athlete in the aquatic events (open water, synchronized swimming, pool, diving and water polo) tested positive. http://www.supersport.com/aquatics/inte ... n_negative

                    FINA brags in the article that they did 433 urine tests and 85 blood tests! And, this is the sport that is being tabbed to takeover the summer olympics standardbearer from athletics? They did 518 total tests! 631 total athletes in just swimming and 102 medals (that doesn't include MULTIPLE medals awarded per team in the relays) to be awarded and they only did 518 total tests. Only 85 blood. 85!

                    In 2011 before Daegu, the IAAF announced that it would blood test EVERY SINGLE competitor http://www.iaaf.org/news/news/blood-tes ... gu-in-unpr - that was nearly 2000 athletes!

                    Either FINA ain't trying that hard or the IOC is in full on PR mode.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

                      Originally posted by Conor Dary
                      But it is only money. And fame and pay-for-view, etc. But we have the moralists on our side, such as Phil Hersh.
                      • Oh, the joy I will have snubbing Sosa, Bonds and Clemens (plus McGwire and Palmeiro, natch) on my HoF ballot.


                      http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/ ... -druggies/
                      The best description I've heard of folks like him and the rest of these sanctimonious pricks/sportswriters is "overzealous crossing guards".

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

                        Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                        Originally posted by Conor Dary
                        But it is only money. And fame and pay-for-view, etc. But we have the moralists on our side, such as Phil Hersh.
                        • Oh, the joy I will have snubbing Sosa, Bonds and Clemens (plus McGwire and Palmeiro, natch) on my HoF ballot.


                        http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/ ... -druggies/
                        The best description I've heard of folks like him and the rest of these sanctimonious pricks/sportswriters is "overzealous crossing guards".
                        Phil Hersh is a good guy, jazzy. I don't agree with him on this. He may be an overzealous crossing guard, he is being sanctimonious on this, and he is a sportswriter. A prick he is not.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

                          I think if I were a baseball writer on the voting panel that I would vote "NO" on the first-year ballot. Let them wait a year or at least get a less-than-stellar rating. Will Ben Johnson be in the track and field HoF? Lance Armstrong?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Track should use this approach for Drug Testing

                            Originally posted by bambam
                            Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                            Originally posted by Conor Dary
                            But it is only money. And fame and pay-for-view, etc. But we have the moralists on our side, such as Phil Hersh.
                            • Oh, the joy I will have snubbing Sosa, Bonds and Clemens (plus McGwire and Palmeiro, natch) on my HoF ballot.


                            http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/ ... -druggies/
                            The best description I've heard of folks like him and the rest of these sanctimonious pricks/sportswriters is "overzealous crossing guards".
                            Phil Hersh is a good guy, jazzy. I don't agree with him on this. He may be an overzealous crossing guard, he is being sanctimonious on this, and he is a sportswriter. A prick he is not.
                            Phil Hersh is a prick and he's NOT a good guy. He's a racist. (I don't care if he's a friend to this site) Read his comments about athletes NOT born in the US or from Muslim countries, or his illogical attitude towards libeling sprinters and NOT distance runners and it becomes obvious that he's not always using his column to be a sportswriter. He's not worthy of a HoF ballot...but then neither are most of the other sportswriters who can write what they do and consider ANYONE from that era when there was no testing being done.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: 85 as the new approach?

                              Originally posted by preston
                              Either FINA ain't trying that hard or the IOC [you mean IAAF?] is in full on PR mode.
                              Or the IOC/IAAF are calling their bluff.

                              If athletes think there is a good chance of being tested, possibly that will be enough for them to dial back on the PED's? If the athletes knew that only 85 tests would be carried out then they might take the risk, hoping that if they get called they can 'accidently' miss it, or have time to manipulate it?

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