Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Confidence and racing

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Confidence and racing

    I am very much convinced that many more Americans can run as well as AWebb and DLincoln have today if they got their heads in the right place. Krum was really the first one to bust the barrier a couple years ago. Now its Alan and Dan. Slattery seems to have that fearlessness as well. The mid-d guys seem to not get scared of the big bad Kenyan's, Ethiopians and Moroccans... now the mythical barrier has to be shattered in the 5k and 10k. The reason why guys like Riley, Torres, Ritz, Goucher, etc won't run 12:50 in the 5k or 26:50 in the 10k is NOT because they are not capable of it, but rather because they are not capable of believing that they can do it. Its because they are not willing to go with the rabbit and leave it all out on the track and risk dying or dnf'ing. I hope these gus get inspired by Alan and Lincoln and the next race they run, they go out at "breakneck" pace. Maybe they'll find that they can handle it better than they thought and shatter through some barriers.

    Despiet common logic, you don't have to run 13:20 before running 13:10 before running 12:59 before running 12:50. As Ritz showed us, you can go straight to 27:38 and as many a Kenyan has showed us, you can go straight to 13:00 if you just believe you can.

    Its funny, I have seen some Kenyan's run workouts that are not all that impressive. Yet when they are done with them, they think they are in fantastic shape... lets say 3:30 for 1500 or 13:00 for 5k. I'll then see some American's running not much slower in their workouts and they're letting the rabbits go and settling for the 'A' or 'B' standard. The expectations have got to change.

    The most personal example I have is one of my best friends from college. He surely can run 2:20 in the marathon, but thinks that is insanely fast. He ran 2:35 in his debut off of a decent college career that was not high milage (60s). He probably put in 10 months in the 80s and then ran that at 22/3 years old on his first try. The reason he won't run 2:20 or faster (besides the fact that he is not willing to train for it) is because he doesn't think its possible. If he doesn't think its possible, he won't train for it. If he doesn't train for it... well, you get the picture.

  • #2
    Re: Confidence and racing

    The reason why guys
    >like Riley, Torres, Ritz, Goucher, etc won't run 12:50 in the 5k or 26:50 in
    >the 10k is NOT because they are not capable of it, but rather because they are
    >not capable of believing that they can do it.


    glad you've got this all worked out for them, and i'm glad you can read all their minds too!


    Its because they are not willing
    >to go with the rabbit and leave it all out on the track and risk dying or
    >dnf'ing. I hope these gus get inspired by Alan

    yeah, all those races webb DNFed and died in.. the list is huge! er.

    webb goes with the rabbits because he's in shape to do so..

    i think its really insulting to the above mentioned distance runners to decide their inability to compete at the level of the world's bests is because their confidence is low. running is all the professionals really do, i'm sure they do what they're capable of.

    webb is an outstanding talent and disciplined worker. i think his talent level easily trumps his distance counterparts.. a breakthrough like this hopefully will inspire other american runners, of course, but you paint a far too simplistic picture. they have every reason to want to compete with the best already.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Confidence and racing

      What kind of times did your friend run in college?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Confidence and racing

        Basehead,

        Are you one of those I mentioned, because you got awefully defensive. THEY WERE EXAMPLES. I used those specific people's names to simply show that IN MY OPINION we have the talent to run wih the best in the world. I actually think that any one or all of those people can break through... I obviously have much more respect for their talents than you do because I don't believe they are performing as well as they could be. Well, I believe Goucher was when he ran 13:11 and I think the others will soon.

        Bottom line is you sit back and say,

        "Mike, its OK you ran 4:00 in the 1500. You have only modest talent and can't realistically expect to go out with the rabbit at 3:55 pace. You gave it your all and that's what matters."

        I sit back and say,

        "Mike, why don't you TRY going with the rabbit. You might surprise yourself. You give yourself too little credit... I know you can be up there and close in a 60. Try going with the rabbit next time and see what happens."

        Ritz certainly has the latter attitude. Goucher did and I'm sure Torres has. Again, those guys were examples of the type of people, in my opinion, who can make waves in the International Arena... that's a good thing.

        MJD... he ran 8:26 in the 3k indoors, 14:35ish in the 5k but ran pretty low mileage...

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Confidence and racing

          MJD... he ran 8:26 in the 3k indoors, 14:35ish in the 5k but ran
          >pretty low mileage...

          Without getting into the rest of debate, your friends expectations were way too low.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Confidence and racing

            Conto, I don’t if Ritz’s 10k is a very good example of what you are trying to state. If he would have taken your advice, he would have tried to run with Meb. He ran a very smart race and was in shape to run 27:38.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Confidence and racing

              In general I agree that in order to win an athletic contest you must be confident. Fear of failure is not a good driving force and can lead to overtraining and lack of guts in racing. It always amazes me how many good athletes start out confident and slowly start fearing failure and end up retiring unhappy and unsatisfied. Usually they never acheive their potential. But there's always hope that an athlete can turn it around, and that's really something.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Confidence and racing

                Meb went with the pace in the Worlds 10, wound up finishing behind Culpepper. It's just not that simple.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Confidence and racing

                  >Meb went with the pace in the Worlds 10, wound up finishing behind Culpepper.
                  >It's just not that simple.

                  I know I was trying to praise Ritz's effort.Maybe
                  that comment was not directed at my post.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Confidence and racing

                    All the above views have merit...but I'm going to support Conto in the truth of the power of believing. Ultimately the athletes that believe they can are the ones that do it...even tho along the way there may be periods of failure and frustration. Did you notice what Alan Webb said when he was interviewed after the Home Depot break through? He said, "I knew if I just kept going..." He believed thru all his set backs and frustrations (and don't we know about them from the long threads on this board!) that he could run at world class level. Ritz is also a believer, and there are others, Bob Kennedy being a long time example.

                    No matter how much talent you have if you don't believe (like the man and the 2:20 marathon) you won't do it. And, as Conto said, if you believe and just go for it, that's when the break thrus often happen.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X