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Great year for men's SP

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  • Great year for men's SP

    So, after O'Dayne Richards's 21.61 at the Comm Games, no. 10 on this year's world list is 21.37 (I'm talking combined indoor/outdoor). Believe it or not, that's the best since 1986!

    And that's not the only throwing event that's looking good this year. Women's DT is really rebounding after many down years. Currently the year's no. 10 performer is at 65.51, which is the best since 1997.
    Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

  • #2
    The men's SP has been at a good level for a few years now so it will be interesting to see when (if?) we see a drop. The women's DT stat is surprising as I'd never thought it was that good (although to be honest I've paid less attention to that event this season)

    The cycles that events go through always interest me. Just when an event looks to be doing well, the following year it can be dreadful. We've seen some great seasons in the women's LJ, HJ and TJ and now all 3 of those events are so-so.

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    • #3
      That really did sneak up on us. And quite a few young-ish throwers in both events.

      Crouser and Walsh were born in 1992, Storl and Clarke in 1990. Only Hoffa, Cantwell and Whiting are older than 26.

      In the WDT, Craft (1993), Perez (1991), Fischer (1990) and Perkovic (1990) are all relative youngsters. As usual there are a couple of women in their mid-30s (Lewis-Smallwood, and Robert-Michon, but there's grounds to hope the renaissance continues.

      Along with MHJ, it's exciting times in the field.

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      • #4
        I agree on these two events, but their counterparts are not that great. The men discus is not bad, even if Malachowski never approached his monster throw from last year (71.84 if I recall well) and Harting competes rarely. The women shot is not great at all: no youngsters of a certain level, Adams not at her best, Kolodko never returned to 20+ form, Schwanitz at the moment doesn't seem to be great either... Gong stopped improving and I could go on...

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        • #5
          While we are on the topic, can someone explain why the U.S. men are so dominant in this event? At least as far as marks are concerned. Championship record is a different story, but look at the top 5, 10, 20 lists and it is littered with Americans.

          Not even remotely close for the other throws. Once upon a time the U.S. produced world class male discus throwers, but not so much and the hammer and Javelin are no where.

          Any theories?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by highjumpfan View Post
            While we are on the topic, can someone explain why the U.S. men are so dominant in this event? At least as far as marks are concerned. Championship record is a different story, but look at the top 5, 10, 20 lists and it is littered with Americans.
            Competition. If you want to compete for the US at WCs or OGs you have to be able to throw over 22m, otherwise you might not qualify. But who cares about marks? I'm guessing the americans would trade all their 22m throws for one of Majewski's olympic gold medals.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by norunner View Post
              Competition. If you want to compete for the US at WCs or OGs you have to be able to throw over 22m, otherwise you might not qualify. But who cares about marks? I'm guessing the americans would trade all their 22m throws for one of Majewski's olympic gold medals.
              The shot put is an off-shoot of American football. One of the major American sports dictates a body type which is conducive to throwing the shot put. Is there any other major international sport which needs a raft of very large men?

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              • #8
                Sumo Wrestling.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by norunner View Post
                  Sumo Wrestling.
                  Good one But I guess sumo wrestlers are too big and lack the necessary speed.
                  Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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                  • #10
                    The other two sports that 'compete' for SPer types are obviously weightlifting and rugby (both sorts, but Union more so).

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                    • #11
                      Not weightlifting. That sport favors stocky, short-limbed people.
                      Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Powell View Post
                        Not weightlifting. That sport favors stocky, short-limbed people.
                        But Reese Hoffa is only around 6 feet tall, Vasili Alexejev was the same height and similar built i think. For rotation you don't need to be that tall.

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                        • #13
                          OK, there may be some overlap in body type, but only with the fairly small group of heavyweight lifters.
                          Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by highjumpfan View Post
                            While we are on the topic, can someone explain why the U.S. men are so dominant in this event? At least as far as marks are concerned. Championship record is a different story, but look at the top 5, 10, 20 lists and it is littered with Americans.

                            Not even remotely close for the other throws. Once upon a time the U.S. produced world class male discus throwers, but not so much and the hammer and Javelin are no where.

                            Any theories?
                            A theory I've always held on this is the fact that sometimes in the U.S. there can be an over-emphasis on maximal strength development-particularly in sports like football (American)-as some have pointed out there probably is a relationship with both the culture and the training for that sport. The point being that though it's very important for development you can devote too many weeks to it for a given phase or season to the detriment of other qualities. It's heavy (literally and figuratively) emphasis however (again IMO) translates better to the shot than any other track and field event due to the very high force requirements (certainly rate of force as well) and the very short duration that is required for a rotational guy/girl but particularly for a glider.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by AS View Post
                              The other two sports that 'compete' for SPer types are obviously weightlifting and rugby (both sorts, but Union more so).
                              Yes and the weightlifters and shot putters often have incredible acceleration abilities (due to their ability to not only produce the highest forces relative to other track and field events and high rates of force development being very important to overcome inertia) better than even the best sprinters over very short distances like 5-10m (up to 15m or so?). I think Gunthor still holds the world record for a standing long jump, possibly.

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