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Coe makes run for IAAF Presidency official

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  • #16
    Very impressed with his pamphlet. That should tip him over Bubka, right?
    http://www.sebcoe2015.org/wp-content...NAL_141202.pdf
    The Street Athletics circuit sounds genius, I really hope it happens
    : )
    Bolt's last year...and my last year as a track fan, it's been fun

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    • #17
      I wonder if Coe's manifesto is too 'radical' for the IAAF though? They will like his commercial suggestions, but I can imagine a lot of voters would prefer a more traditional manifesto, which I assume Bubka has.

      My concern with Bubka is that there is something going on in Ukraine similar to what has been uncovered in Russia, and he could be implicit in that.

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      • #18
        Coe's problem may well be the same as Eugene's was: a program that sounds best to the hardcore fans of the world, but ends up being voted on by people who have no such credentials.

        How many of the 211 "nation" delegates do you think even know Coe has made this manifesto and at any point will even read it? When it comes down to the election it'll all be about politics and alliances, unfortunately.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by berkeley View Post
          I would have thought Coe could afford to hire an editor (or even a junior proofreader) before publishing his opening remarks:

          http://www.trackandfieldnews.com/ind...le?arId=106542

          If I were a high school english teacher, I would be doing a bit of redlining ...
          What are you rabbiting on about??
          It would appear that you have never been a speech writer.

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          • #20
            No, I've never been a speech writer or an english teacher, but I'm pretty sure that:
            1. "Nor" should follow another negative.
            2. A sentence should not start with "And".
            3. Dangling prepositions are bad.
            4. If young people find other sports and activities, they will definitely not be ours. If they were, they would not be "other". Unlikely just doesn't cover it.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by berkeley View Post
              No, I've never been a speech writer or an english teacher, but I'm pretty sure that:
              1. "Nor" should follow another negative.
              2. A sentence should not start with "And".
              3. Dangling prepositions are bad.
              4. If young people find other sports and activities, they will definitely not be ours. If they were, they would not be "other". Unlikely just doesn't cover it.
              Silly points ? who cares about the perfect English... twat.!

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              • #22
                Originally posted by berkeley View Post
                No, I've never been a speech writer or an english teacher, but I'm pretty sure that:
                1. "Nor" should follow another negative.
                2. A sentence should not start with "And".
                3. Dangling prepositions are bad.
                4. If young people find other sports and activities, they will definitely not be ours. If they were, they would not be "other". Unlikely just doesn't cover it.
                Grammar changes with usage.
                Language constantly changes and evolves through usage. What may have been considered grammatically incorrect when I was in high school may be the accepted norm today. The most important thing about language is that one conveys what they mean. Coe definitely does that.

                And, for what it is worth, MICROSOFT WORD grammar check seems to be a whole lot more forgiving than you. Oops - terrible started a sentence with "AND".

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                • #23
                  your No. 2 is one of the Oxford dictionary's "great myths"

                  http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2...a-conjunction/

                  Having noted that, when I was in grade school—and I suspect was common for most others—the "no and to start" was a rule that made good sense, because at that age it leads to incomplete or incoherent sentences. with proper phrasing, it's just fine.

                  Which leads to your No. 1, which as you will have seen from the Oxford article, notes that "nor" is one of other coordinating conjunctions, so having it up front is just fine.

                  I believe your'e thinking of a rule which is frequently broken where people use "neither" and follow it with "or," when it needs to be followed with "nor."

                  Dangling prepositions are another great myth (propogated, it's true by generations of misguided English teachers).

                  http://www.newrepublic.com/article/1...eposition-myth

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                  • #24
                    In his autobiography, Coe shows he is a good writer:
                    http://www.amazon.com/Running-Life-A...=sebastian+coe
                    Bolt's last year...and my last year as a track fan, it's been fun

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                    • #25
                      So, where is the prolific poster that is the TOE?

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                      • #26
                        We all express, from time to time, bĂȘte noires about certain usage aspects of the English language , which does indeed change with time, but no so horrendously fast as at present. I hate the use of "neither" "or" which should be , as pointed out, " nor". I hate "bored of" instead of "bored with".

                        My main complaint at the buggeration (have I invented a new word?) of our great tongue is the changes brought about by crappy TV programmes from the USA, often spoken by semi literate juveniles. Such changes have spread to the august speech of presenters on the main tv channels, and also so called celebrities who feel that to be connected to the youth of the western world necessitates turning endless nouns in to verbs ( Grrr).The example of the moment is to "man up"; I told my grandson if he uses it I reduce his Xmas cash by 50 %.!!!
                        Last edited by bennyg; 12-05-2014, 08:39 AM.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by bennyg View Post
                          The example of the moment is to "man up"; I told my grandson if he uses it I reduce his Xmas cash by 50 %.!!!
                          You are awful. But I like you *push*

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by bennyg View Post
                            ….

                            My main complaint at the buggeration (have I invented a new word?) of our great tongue is the changes brought about by crappy TV programmes from the USA, often spoken by semi literate juveniles. ….
                            To rail against the evolution of the English language as driven by popular culture is to be Canute sitting at the shore.

                            Best just to recite the serenity prayer and revel in the fact that one of the greatest things about our mother tongue is that it's truly a living language that progresses with time.

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                            • #29
                              Some of us do not worship the excesses of "popular culture" The words "progresses " with time is fortunately a matter of opinion.!!!! I note the utterly appalling overuse of the word "like" which punctuates the speech in every sentence of todays young speakers. I guarantee that the posters here do not use that word in every sentence; you know what I mean, like.?
                              Last edited by bennyg; 12-05-2014, 04:53 PM.

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                              • #30
                                Wow - I don't think I've had that much abuse since I criticized Morgan Uceny for not getting up and finishing the 2011 WC 1500 final
                                gh - I concede the points about starting a sentence with a conjunction, and dangling prepositions. Writers I admire, including Churchill, Kingsley Amis (who effective called me an ignorant slob in the article you cited) and Stephen Fry have all weighed in against overly strict grammatical rules, and I understand that language evolves, etc. This doesn't make ugly or lazy evolutions any less grating, because language is also an art, not just a utilitarian form of communication. If it were, we would all be speaking Esperanto today.
                                However, I stick by my point about "nor". I'm not referring to the rule about leading conjunctions, or confusing it with the neither-or usage. Nor connects two negatives, not a positive and a negative.
                                I didn't say that Lord Coe should be a great writer. I said that as a career politician with a very high income, he should hire a proofreader for public speeches or written statements.

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