Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Devon Allen potentially injured

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Devon Allen potentially injured

    First play and he may have injured his knee.

    And that is why great hurdles should hurdle rather than play chicken with their knees laying football.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Dave View Post
    First play and he may have injured his knee.

    And that is why great hurdles should hurdle rather than play chicken with their knees laying football.
    Not good.
    http://www.oregonlive.com/ducks/inde...rt_maj-story-1

    Comment


    • #3
      From front page article

      Receiver Devon Allen, the NCAA and U.S. 110-meter hurdles champ, hurt his right knee on the opening kickoff.
      "I cut wrong and hurt my knee a little bit," he said. "I've just got to see what's wrong in a few days and go from there."
      . . . he might miss the 2015 outdoor track and field season, which he said doesn't bother him, necessarily. . . . "It's something I do, but I'm not going to rush it," he said. "I'm going to take time to make sure I'm OK. I can definitely (redshirt). It's not a huge deal. I enjoy track and I want to run, but sometimes you've got to take care of yourself."
      :-(

      Comment


      • #4
        LOL yeah I don't think track is where his passion is.

        Comment


        • #5
          But we may see more and more football players and ex-football players due to physically dangerous conditions (stenosis of the spine like the triple jumper that was a first round draft choice a couple years ago that has had to retire for safety reason).

          Comment


          • #6
            He out-faked himself. He cut one way and jinkied his body the other way.

            Comment


            • #7
              Of course, the Duck track board is full of comments about whether he should be playing football. Yes, he's jeopardizing a potentially great track career, but he's doing what he loves and he's doing it at one of the few schools who recruited him which would allow him to compete in both sports. Assuming he's equally passionate about both, the obvious financial move would be to play football. He was the Ducks leading receiver in TD passes going into the Rose Bowl, not a terrible place to be on one of the best teams in the country. As more of a track than football fan, I'd much rather see him dump football, but the economics of track don't even begin to compare with the kind of $$$ he could make playing football.....and hurdlers fight injury, too. The Ducks (both football and track programs) tend to follow the Belechick rules of revealing injuries, so unless someone sees him coming out of a hospital surgical ward, we can only guess at the severity of the injury. Let's hope it's a minor tear or major bruise that will heal itself with rest.
              Last edited by bruce3404; 01-04-2015, 09:14 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by polevaultpower View Post
                LOL yeah I don't think track is where his passion is.
                Yeah, it's obvious he knows which side his bread is buttered on. Marquis Goodwin, Trindon Holliday and Jeff Demps have already made more money than they would have ever sniffed in track.

                Comment


                • #9
                  As much as I detest football, and I really do, I would think Allen a fool not to pursue it if he has any interest. Unless money isn't a motivation for him.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Some football economics: The NFL taxi squad minimum for 2014 was $6300/wk; some teams pay more, especially if they want to protect a player from signing elsewhere. Not counting potential signing bonuses based on draft position or apparel contracts, a taxi squad player makes $100K/yr. Get called up for one game on the regular roster and you automatically get paid for three (minimum $26,000 per game). Thus a taxi squad player who plays in just one game, but stays on the taxi squad the entire year would make $159,000. How many hurdlers are making that kind of money? If one sticks on a regular season roster, rookies made a minimum of $420,000 this past season. I wonder if Aries Merritt made that much the year he broke the WR? For argument's sake, let's demote Allen to a 5th round pick. Last year's average 5th rounders signed 4 year contracts in the neighborhood of $2.4 million, with $200,000 guaranteed. Move him up a round and it becomes $2.7 million and $475,000. As gm mentions, unless he has no interest in money, there really isn't much of a decision to be made provided that he stays football-healthy. Even should he become mainly a kick returner, with his speed, quickness and hurdling ability (i.e., balance), there's so much more money to be made.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Don't forget the fact that track and field athletes have much higher overhead (eg. coaching fees, medical insurance, travel expenses, trainers, massages, etc.) than NFL players. There's also bonuses for NFL playoff appearances to consider:
                      • Wild-card game (division winners): $23,000

                        Wild-card game (non-division winners): $21,000

                        Divisional playoff game: $23,000

                        Conference championship game: $42,000

                        Super Bowl winners: $92,000

                        Super Bowl losers: $46,000

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you are the 100th best track athlete in the country, how much money do you make ? If you are the 100th best baseball/football/basketball player how much do you make ?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post
                          Don't forget the fact that track and field athletes have much higher overhead (eg. coaching fees, medical insurance, travel expenses, trainers, massages, etc.) than NFL players. There's also bonuses for NFL playoff appearances to consider:
                          • Wild-card game (division winners): $23,000
                            Wild-card game (non-division winners): $21,000
                            Divisional playoff game: $23,000
                            Conference championship game: $42,000
                            Super Bowl winners: $92,000
                            Super Bowl losers: $46,000
                          Which, to most players, is chump change, compared to their signing bonuses, base contracts, incentive clauses, and promotional fees/contracts.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post
                            Super Bowl losers: $46,000
                            An unfortunate lol here.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post
                              Don't forget the fact that track and field athletes have much higher overhead (eg. coaching fees, medical insurance, travel expenses, trainers, massages, etc.) than NFL players. There's also bonuses for NFL playoff appearances to consider:

                              ...

                              Super Bowl losers: $46,000[/list]
                              And consider that the super bowl loser bonus is about 10% of the minimum yearly salary for an NFL player.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X