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  • Average age of No. 1 event rankers

    I've done zero research, but looking at the men's leaders this year, I'm guessing their average age may be the highest ever. If not average age, then perhaps the average tenure in the top 10. Can anyone comment with more data ?

  • #2
    YEAH and the average age is going to do nothing but go up as more and more athletes finally figure it out that they can compete into their mid 30's and still rank in the world.

    Imagine that..

    and as more athletes realize that nobody cares if you start to decline as you get older....

    You dont have to retire early at 35 just because you think people are going to make fun of you because you are a tenth of a second slower than you were at 22..

    You dont have to retire early just because you want to be at peak condition when you do.

    Do the sport because you like it not because people are going to talk crap about you when you start to get slower..

    Alot of people are going to find out sooner or later that you can win an olympic title at 38-41 if you put your mind to it..

    The few athletes that stuck with it have already won olympic titles in their mid 30's...

    felix sanchez going on 35 years old in 2012 in the 400 hurdles...

    See that? Its really not that hard to figure out.. 30 isnt old.. Its young..

    And the sooner people realize this then the less people are going to start talking about retiring at 30.... The human body gets stronger into its 30's .... Not weaker...

    Therefore get the facts right..

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    • #3
      Originally posted by track400meters View Post
      YEAH and the average age is going to do nothing but go up as more and more athletes finally figure it out that they can compete into their mid 30's and still rank in the world.

      Imagine that..

      and as more athletes realize that nobody cares if you start to decline as you get older....

      You dont have to retire early at 35 just because you think people are going to make fun of you because you are a tenth of a second slower than you were at 22..

      You dont have to retire early just because you want to be at peak condition when you do.

      Do the sport because you like it not because people are going to talk crap about you when you start to get slower..

      Alot of people are going to find out sooner or later that you can win an olympic title at 38-41 if you put your mind to it..

      The few athletes that stuck with it have already won olympic titles in their mid 30's...

      felix sanchez going on 35 years old in 2012 in the 400 hurdles...

      See that? Its really not that hard to figure out.. 30 isnt old.. Its young..

      And the sooner people realize this then the less people are going to start talking about retiring at 30.... The human body gets stronger into its 30's .... Not weaker...

      Therefore get the facts right..
      I'm willing to bet that sometimes its not always about age and how healthy you are.

      I'm sure there are many athletes who would love to stay pro past their mid to late 30's, but contracts and sponsors may be an issue. Being a pro costs money, and sometimes that tenth of a second could be the deciding factor between having a sponsor or not.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by track400meters View Post
        The human body gets stronger into its 30's .... Not weaker...
        Therefore get the facts right.
        Speaking of getting the facts right . . .
        The human body CAN get stronger in its 30s; faster*, no. One can, however gain enough strength to overcome the decelerating turnover rate with a longer stride.

        *neurological term - we definitely start slowing in our EARLY 30s.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Atticus View Post
          Speaking of getting the facts right . . .
          The human body CAN get stronger in its 30s; faster*, no. One can, however gain enough strength to overcome the decelerating turnover rate with a longer stride.

          *neurological term - we definitely start slowing in our EARLY 30s.
          For sure that is the truth. At 63 I am stronger in terms of bench press etc than I was when competing 40 years ago. But speed and flexibility have all but disappeared. My discus throwing (m60+) feels "fast" in my turn but video soon brings me back to reality as it seems I am watching a slow motion recording.

          i think that for older athletes like Sanchez etc they can get stronger but the real key to their success is their being able to delay the inevitable onset of disappearing speed and flexibility.

          Comment

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