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  • #31
    Good marks for both Pearson & Jenneke in the 100h. Of course, Pearson has bested 12.59 many times, but that equals her best from 2014, so I will take it as good indicator of another good season to come (I realize the wind is different, but I'll leave it to others to fine-tune the analysis). As for Jenneke, these two sub-13 marks signal a big step forward for her. She has run her six best ever so far this year. Hope she continues this progress.

    Here is a trivia question related to Pearson & Jenneke on Australia's all-time 100h performer & performances list: Jenneke's 12.82 puts her #2 a-t performer on AUS 100h list, behind Pearson, of course. And with that significant accomplishment for Jenneke noted, it also is a means to show Pearson's long-term excellence, because Jenneke's 12.82, even while it makes her #2 AUS performer in this event, makes her just =#80 on the performance list. Can anyone think of any other nation's all-time performer/performance lists (in any event) in which the number of performances by the #1 performer places the #2 performer so far down on the performance list? (As for the possible answers, I have no idea.) Perhaps such things are everywhere, but this one really jumped out at me when I looked at the lists.

    (ps. OK, given a couple of minutes of thought, I came up with one, which means there are probably quite a few, if I can think of one. But -- in the off-chance that this question is of any interest at all -- I don't want to clutter this thread, so I will move the question to the Historical forum.)
    Master Po
    Senior Member
    Last edited by Master Po; 03-29-2015, 05:00 PM.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Master Po View Post
      Here is a trivia question related to Pearson & Jenneke on Australia's all-time 100h performer & performances list: Jenneke's 12.82 puts her #2 a-t performer on AUS 100h list, behind Pearson, of course. And with that significant accomplishment for Jenneke noted, it also is a means to show Pearson's long-term excellence, because Jenneke's 12.82, even while it makes her #2 AUS performer in this event, makes her just =#80 on the performance list. Can anyone think of any other nation's all-time performer/performance lists (in any event) in which the number of performances by the #1 performer places the #2 performer so far down on the performance list? (As for the possible answers, I have no idea.) Perhaps such things are everywhere, but this one really jumped out at me when I looked at the lists.
      I'd assume there are quite a few such cases around the world. Off the top of my head, Murofushi and Bubka both have that beaten, but the overall #1 in this regard is probably someone a bit more obscure.

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      • #33
        I wonder how many throws Valerie has over 17.26m?

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        • #34
          I doubt that the number 2 vaulter from USSR/Russia Fed or whatever they called it/Ukraine is that far behind, but the multiple countries countries here mark the comparison a bit more complicated.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by nztrackfan View Post
            I wonder how many throws Valerie has over 17.26m?
            17.26m, Valerie Young 1964 at the Tokyo Olympic Games
            Answer to the question - Val Adams probably has about 1 million throws over 17.26m. Whatever the number it is huge.

            In 2008 Ana PO'UHILA-KISINA threw 18.03m but although a dual Tonga / NZ citizen (so I understand) I believe she used to throw for Tonga so that she could compete in the Olympics as she had no chance of qualifying for NZ.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Tuariki View Post
              17.26m, Valerie Young 1964 at the Tokyo Olympic Games
              Answer to the question - Val Adams probably has about 1 million throws over 17.26m. Whatever the number it is huge.

              In 2008 Ana PO'UHILA-KISINA threw 18.03m but although a dual Tonga / NZ citizen (so I understand) I believe she used to throw for Tonga so that she could compete in the Olympics as she had no chance of qualifying for NZ.
              Based on IAAF listings Valerie has at least 150 throws of 18.00 metres or further. Unfortunately the lists available on IAAF and NZ Athletics do not allow for a complete total. However, it would appear that she probably had between 160 to 170 throws exceeding 17.26m. And if you counted all throws in a competition the number probably exceeds 600.

              The last time she threw less than 18.00m appears to be in 2002 when she was 17.

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              • #37
                Back to the results, great conditions in the final day. I am not sure if I have ever seen times get rounded down as much as they did on that final day from the clock, a few hundredths up or down is usual, but when they drop 0.2 or more in a sprint event, that is unusual, any ideas as to why?

                Brisbane is always quick and the winds were good and it is a National Champs so athletes likely to have peaked for it, so the number of PBs not totally surprising, many from young developing athletes.

                Jenneke's 11.70 100m/12.82 100mh ratio is pretty impressive, is that a best for a 100mh in terms of the small gap between the two? She's strong and aggressive, going with Pearson to the midway point. She's said she's not focussed on sprint speed in training so if she can get it down to 11.50s, then it would be good to see her take that 12.82 down even further.

                I also thought it was a good run from Breen, looks like she hit all her phases and ran a solid final in one of her best times event. Interesting how she and her coach used the race as a set up to what she will face in Beijing.

                http://www.foxsports.com.au/more-spo...-1227283754449
                Speedster
                Senior Member
                Last edited by Speedster; 03-30-2015, 02:57 PM.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Speedster View Post
                  I am not sure if I have ever seen times get rounded down as much as they did on that final day from the clock, a few hundredths up or down is usual, but when they drop 0.2 or more in a sprint event, that is unusual, any ideas as to why?
                  Because the stadium clock wasn't working properly? These things (and the on-screen clocks in tv broadcasts) are there for orientation only, and are not subject to the same standards as the official timing equipment. It's not that unusual for them to stop at a completely wrong moment.
                  Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Powell View Post
                    Because the stadium clock wasn't working properly? These things (and the on-screen clocks in tv broadcasts) are there for orientation only, and are not subject to the same standards as the official timing equipment. It's not that unusual for them to stop at a completely wrong moment.
                    Thanks for clarifying Powell.

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                    • #40
                      Some reworking of the all-time Aussie top 10 lists from this weekend's Stanford meeting:
                      M10,000m:
                      27:45:01 Dave McNeill
                      The Northern Arizona alum moves to #7 alltime (but still behind Ron Clarke)

                      W5,000m:
                      15:11.17 Madeleine Heiner (moves to #6)
                      15:19.06 Emily Brichacek (moves to #10)

                      Nice to Lapierre back out to 8.16 also
                      AS
                      Senior Member
                      Last edited by AS; 05-04-2015, 04:06 AM.

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                      • #41
                        A few more moves on Aussie all time #10s in the past month or so:

                        Melissa Duncan moves up to #5 in 1500 with her 4.05.56 in Oslo (she was at #6 with 4.05.76).

                        Madeline Heiner's 8.44.20 in Hengelo in May is the new #3 3000m.

                        Heiner's 9.21.56 steeple in Rome is the new #2. She's been creeping up over few months, moving from #5 with 9.34.01 from last year, to #4 with her 9.31.03 in Melbourne and #3 with her 9.28.41 in Doha. Her next target is Macfarlane's NR of 9.18.35.

                        US Collegiate Laura Rose Donegan became the 7th Aussie steepler to go sub-10min two weeks ago at the NCAA regionals (9.59.71), and she's topped that in the NCAA semis (9.58.95). If she can top 9.53.15 in the final she'll shift to #6 all time.

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                        • #42
                          Two of the younger guns of Aussie middle distance running hit Europe this week:

                          It's (Alex) Rowe vs (Jordan) Williamsz over 800m in Sollentuna, SWE on Thurs:
                          http://www.folksamgp.se/SollentunaGP...sp?PageId=1548

                          Williamsz' Villanova teammate Sam McEntee goes in the 1500m.

                          Buckman, Hetherington, Nipperness, and Kelsey-Lee Roberts are also on the program.

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                          • #43
                            And Nina Kennedy in Mannheim this weekend, i'm really looking forward to seeing her.

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                            • #44
                              norunner, do you have entry lists for Mannheim? She may not be the only Aussie.

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                              • #45
                                She is, i checked before i posted the info about Nina: http://2015.junioren-gala.de/pages/de/teilnehmer.php

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