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  • Justin Gatlin second leg?

    As we know there are those who excell on that leg, Leroy Burrell, Bernard Williams, Glenroy Gilbert, Ato Boldon, Daneil Sanguoma,Michael Frater and Justin Gatlin. But.....shouldn't he be running the anchor leg?

    Let's just assume Bolt is in 9.75 shape, who else do we have who could hold him off if close?

    And if we do run Gatlin on the anchor what do we do with Ryan Bailey? Has he ever ran a second leg? How about Bracy, Bromell?

  • #2
    Speed is fungible on 2nd, 3rd and anchor legs, where you get a running start. The reason why Jamaica runs Bolt on anchor and not 2nd is because of his lack of baton skills, not his footspeed.

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    • #3
      there's a school of thought (one to which I subscribe, if for no other reason than that's how my HS coach preached the gospel) that you put your fastest guy/guyette on leg 2 for the simple reason that they can take the baton early and hand off late and produce maximal speed for more than 100m on the straightaway.

      Remember that Germany used Armin Hary, who had earlier in the meet won the 100, on the second leg of the Rome 4x1 and set a WR (even if they crossed the line behind the U.S., which was DQed for…. yeah, you know what).

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      • #4
        GH, I agree with your school of thought (2ng-leg-receive-early-pass-late) on the high school level where it's not uncommon for one runner to be a second faster than other members of the team, but for nations like Jamaica and the U.S., who can put four sub-9.9 guys on the track, I believe all three exchanges should be made as late in the zone as possible. If I were a relay coach, my inclination would be to put left-handed runners on second and anchor legs if all other things were equal.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by gh View Post
          there's a school of thought (one to which I subscribe, if for no other reason than that's how my HS coach preached the gospel) that you put your fastest guy/guyette on leg 2 for the simple reason that they can take the baton early and hand off late and produce maximal speed for more than 100m on the straightaway.

          Remember that Germany used Armin Hary, who had earlier in the meet won the 100, on the second leg of the Rome 4x1 and set a WR (even if they crossed the line behind the U.S., which was DQed for…. yeah, you know what).
          I'm into that...long second leg...thing. And Gatlin is perfect in that role, but I keep seeing Bolt running down Bailey. Yes I know without Gatlin on that...long second leg...he wouldn't have had the lead.

          As we know without Blake or Frater who does Jamaica have on their second leg that Bailey/Bracy/Bromell? can't handle? Not many countries have a 9.95ish cat there.

          Armin Hary, yep, that's right.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post
            GH, I agree with your school of thought (2ng-leg-receive-early-pass-late) on the high school level where it's not uncommon for one runner to be a second faster than other members of the team, but for nations like Jamaica and the U.S., who can put four sub-9.9 guys on the track, I believe all three exchanges should be made as late in the zone as possible. If I were a relay coach, my inclination would be to put left-handed runners on second and anchor legs if all other things were equal.
            I;m not wanting my two slowest sprinters with stick in hand the same % of the race as my two studs. I don't want 4x 25%

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dickson View Post
              I;m not wanting my two slowest sprinters with stick in hand the same % of the race as my two studs. I don't want 4x 25%
              Then you do not understand the difference in speed at 30 meters vs 20 meters in comparison to the difference between high-level sprinters. Your 10-flat guy 10-20 meters from his start point is not going as fast as the 10.3 sprinter still at almost maximum speed.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 26mi235 View Post
                Then you do not understand the difference in speed at 30 meters vs 20 meters in comparison to the difference between high-level sprinters. Your 10-flat guy 10-20 meters from his start point is not going as fast as the 10.3 sprinter still at almost maximum speed.
                I ran the 4x1, ok? We used that long second leg approach. Our two fastest sprinters on second/anchor. You can talk to my coach about all that.

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                • #9
                  You put your 200m runners, or at least those in the team fastest over 120-150m, on second leg. Leg 2 is the perfect leg for Gatlin.
                  This was the GDR model (Kich, Wockel, Drechsler, Krabbe) that worked for years.

                  Other things to consider are the obvious; who can run a bend well; who can start; who can or cannot exchange and who does or does not benefit from a running start. Look at Devers in 93, after her clear win over Privalova in the 100m, without the benefit of a block start she is beaten on the last leg in the 4x100m. Similarly, someone like Arron could easily run down women meters ahead of her without the hindrance of a block start.

                  Bailey showed that, with enough of a lead, he can beat Bolt. Perhaps Gatlin will give him that lead. He now has the confidence that x meters gap he can hold.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Gabriella2 View Post
                    You put your 200m runners, or at least those in the team fastest over 120-150m, on second leg. Leg 2 is the perfect leg for Gatlin.
                    This was the GDR model (Kich, Wockel, Drechsler, Krabbe) that worked for years.

                    Other things to consider are the obvious; who can run a bend well; who can start; who can or cannot exchange and who does or does not benefit from a running start. Look at Devers in 93, after her clear win over Privalova in the 100m, without the benefit of a block start she is beaten on the last leg in the 4x100m. Similarly, someone like Arron could easily run down women meters ahead of her without the hindrance of a block start.

                    Bailey showed that, with enough of a lead, he can beat Bolt. Perhaps Gatlin will give him that lead. He now has the confidence that x meters gap he can hold.
                    Bailey showed that he can hold off a Bolt in May, he will be something else come August.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dickson View Post
                      Bailey showed that he can hold off a Bolt in May, he will be something else come August.
                      If I am not mistaken, it was May for everyone in that meet, not just Bolt :-)

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by odelltrclan View Post
                        If I am not mistaken, it was May for everyone in that meet, not just Bolt :-)
                        Exactly. I never understood why some fans (ie. excuse makers) feel the need to mention factors that are common to ALL runners in the same race. Every athlete by now must have gotton the memo that there is a major track meet later this year. I assume they have all taylored their training regimen towards that event.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by odelltrclan View Post
                          If I am not mistaken, it was May for everyone in that meet, not just Bolt :-)
                          If I'm not mistaken Bolt wins Championships and sets record in August, Ryan Bailey does not.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mgb View Post
                            Exactly. I never understood why some fans (ie. excuse makers) feel the need to mention factors that are common to ALL runners in the same race. Every athlete by now must have gotton the memo that there is a major track meet later this year. I assume they have all taylored their training regimen towards that event.
                            So you are seeing Ryan Bailey on a par with Usian Bolt come August? He couldn't beat him in Mano O Mano.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mgb View Post
                              Exactly. I never understood why some fans (ie. excuse makers) feel the need to mention factors that are common to ALL runners in the same race. Every athlete by now must have gotton the memo that there is a major track meet later this year. I assume they have all taylored their training regimen towards that event.
                              Except that the selection method for that meet varies from nation to nation. Bolt has a Wild Card and doesn't have to be in any kind of shape before the end of August. The American sprinters, on the other hand, have a do-or-die meet at the end of June so have to reach some kind of peak much earlier.

                              Many nations don't have their Nationals until July, and even then many don't have a Trials methodology and will simply have their selectors name the team based on who they deem is ready to go come the first week of August, when IAAF qualifying deadline closes.

                              It's actually not at all an even playing field and I keep wondering how long it will take for USATF to finally wake up and see the stupidity of having a selection month some 2 months before the big show.

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