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Yego's big Birmingham throw

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  • rhymans
    replied
    The system is fairer now than it used to be. When Matti Järvinen set a WR of 77.23/253'5 in 1936 under the old system, the throw was actually the first ever 80m throw - 81.23m/266'6. The event isn't the "javelin thrown in the straightest line for distance", just the furthest.

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  • Per Andersen
    replied
    Originally posted by Olli View Post
    With present-day technology both systems are probably equally easy, but with a measuring tape it was probably simpler to always put its other end to the center of the imagined circle.
    Agree! I can't get over the fact that Birmingham's sector only went to 87 meters. What were they thinking? Will other throwers or their coaches now start demanding re-measurement of the zone following close fouls?
    I would think Walcott might be next over 90m.

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  • Olli
    replied
    With present-day technology both systems are probably equally easy, but with a measuring tape it was probably simpler to always put its other end to the center of the imagined circle.

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  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by Olli View Post
    If they measure the shortest distance between the landing point and the line or its extension, then it is perpendicular,
    Bingo! Under the current system, that's not an issue. Getting the measurements would be more tedious and time-consuming if they used the measuring system suggested above, and it only seems logical for the javelin to have sectors just like the other throws do.

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  • Olli
    replied
    Originally posted by Powell View Post
    How did they ensure the measuring tape was always held exactly perpendicular to the line?
    If they measure the shortest distance between the landing point and the line or its extension, then it is perpendicular,

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  • Powell
    replied
    How did they ensure the measuring tape was always held exactly perpendicular to the line?

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  • LopenUupunut
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post
    It's only impractical because of the system already in place and resistance to change. It would have worked well if implemented from the beginning.
    As noted by Olli, it was implemented from the beginning; that's how javelin marks were originally measured. IAAF changed it in 1948, I think.
    Last edited by LopenUupunut; 06-08-2015, 01:41 PM.

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  • 18.99s
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    I'd prefer a measurement system that used straight lines (perpendicular to line of attack). The farther off center you throw, the shorter your measurement.
    Yep, like yard lines on an NFL field. And two parallel lines running the length of the field to mark the valid landing area, instead of a sector.

    (I know, it's impractical)
    It's only impractical because of the system already in place and resistance to change. It would have worked well if implemented from the beginning.
    Last edited by 18.99s; 06-08-2015, 11:53 AM.

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  • El Toro
    replied
    Acccording to this Rules History it was probably post-WWII, with the 1953 IAAF Handbook including the current layout.

    The 4m width of the runway seems to be a metricisation of the old 12 foot scratch line with no sector that was used prior to that.

    There doesn't seem to be any reason given for the 8m radius, so twice the width probably just "looked right" and was easy to set up. The narrow sector resulting from this also probably lined up with the linear nature of the throw and experience of actual landings. Also, a 90 degree sector such as in force for the other long throws at that time would have gone onto the track given that the WR level of the time was already 80m, far in excess of discus and hammer.

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  • Olli
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    I'd prefer a measurement system that used straight lines (perpendicular to line of attack). The farther off center you throw, the shorter your measurement. (I know, it's impractical)
    As far as I remember, javelin used to be measured that way before WW 2 or about that.

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  • lonewolf
    replied
    LopenUupunut gave an excellent explanation of why all throws are and should be measured from an arc rather than a straight foul line.
    Common sense and safety dictate a legal sector. It is not practical to throw from the center of a 600' diameter legal circle.
    To measure perpendicular from a straight line would require a foul line of infinite length. If ruled that throws must be launched between the ends of the foul line, throws measured from a center point behind the foul line to a landing point on either side of center will be shorter than if measured from an arc.
    I do not know why the radius of the arc was set at 8 meters. It could be 7m or 9 m or ??m...whatever the radius, lay out the sector accurately.. problem solved.
    Last edited by lonewolf; 06-08-2015, 03:57 AM.

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  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by 26mi235 View Post
    Because the measurement system references back to a point behind the line; it is a choice, but the more natural one, I think (and might be in keeping with rules across events).
    You're right. The other throws are measured from the landing point to the inside circumference of the throwing circle along a line that extends to the center of the circle. The jav is likewise measured to the inside of the arc along a line that extends to the center of the theoretical circle of which the arc is a part. Thinking about it further, I realized that it almost has to be that way.

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by TN1965 View Post
    When I saw the thread title, I though people were discussing how historic his throw was. #9 all-time, first African over 90m, etc.
    How wrong I was...
    Because it may well have NOT been a valid throw. I sincerely believe the remeasurement of the sector angle was gamed to make the throw valid.

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  • TN1965
    replied
    When I saw the thread title, I though people were discussing how historic his throw was. #9 all-time, first African over 90m, etc.

    How wrong I was...

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  • gh
    replied
    I'd prefer a measurement system that used straight lines (perpendicular to line of attack). The farther off center you throw, the shorter your measurement. (I know, it's impractical)

    Leave a comment:

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