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Carl Lewis long jump comments

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  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by 26mi235 View Post
    Are there any 'legit' timing 4.2s? My sense is that they have been getting more systematic and more correct and that the further back you go the more they have hand times and timed starts, etc.
    I don't know what you mean by "legit", but the NFL has used its current (SAT) timing system since at least 2006. Since then only six 4.2's have been run.

    Leave a comment:


  • scottmitchell74
    replied
    Good point with Donald Thomas - that's exactly who you find. You get D-II/D-III B ballers and coach them up. What about Jacob Tucker/Nate Robinson/Russell Westbrook types with crazy amounts of fast twitch muscle? I agree with JazzyCyclist - every single time I watch an OKC Thunder game I wonder what Westbrook would do in track and field. He's insanely explosive.

    Leave a comment:


  • 26mi235
    replied
    Are there any 'legit' timing 4.2s? My sense is that they have been getting more systematic and more correct and that the further back you go the more they have hand times and timed starts, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sasuke
    replied
    My main fear is that his once invincible bullet start has not been the same in the last years. He improved his final part of the race (last year at JAAA trials he won in spite of a sluggish start). BTW, he should be capable of 6.45, a time none of the others could approach. Brommell has just one fast race this year... he didn't compete much but I don't see him as a favourite.

    Leave a comment:


  • John G
    replied
    Originally posted by Gabriella2 View Post
    Aside form my genuine belief that we cannot and should not compare performances from Carl's era to now, I will offer some constructive criticism to our very own Olympic Champion, Greg Rutherford; I think there are two things Greg can do to help:

    1. Do LJ drills more than once a week. I understand risk of injury and majority of training is sprints, weights and plyometrics, but maybe introducing a second LJ drill session a week will improve technique.

    2. Improve your strength to body weight ratio by losing a bit more weight. Though he has battled hard and done well to lose access weight, I still think Greg looks 'heavy' compared to most LJers.
    One should take height/weight stats with a pinch of salt, but if we look at the top men, Greg is the heaviest:

    Athlete: meters/kg
    Rutherford: 1.88/87
    Lewis 1.88/81
    Powell 1.88/79
    Emmiyan 1.78/69
    Beamon 1.9/70
    Myricks 1.86/82
    Phillips 1.8/82 or 1.83/84
    Pedroso 1.76/66

    He is potentially 6kg (13lbs) heavier than Lewis and Powell, who are recorded as the same height. That's a massive difference.
    My understanding was that Greg purposefully put on extra weight for last season and it went pretty well for him .. .. .. ..

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    I don't think the NBA and the NFL are loaded with 28-foot jumpers, but if long jumping paid as much as pro football and pro basketball, 28-foot jumps would definitely occur with more frequency than they do today, and the discovery of CTE along with the increased awareness of the long-term affects of concussions would cause the frequency to increase.

    Similarly, I don't think track and field are loaded with athletes who could run 4.2 40's at the NFL Combine. It's only been done six times in the last 11 years, and the fact that no one did it this year despite the fact that there was $1 million on the line indicates what an incredible fete this is. Guys who can jump 28' or run the 40 in less than 4.3s are a rare, rare breed regardless of what sport they're in.

    Leave a comment:


  • user4
    replied
    I'll say this much, while there might be a few guys in the nba and nfl that could have been trained over a decade to reach 28ft there is not one that could do what king Carl did.

    It is also interesting to go back in history and find the guys that could have been great long jumpers. First on my list would be :

    1) David Thompson (he really didnt run great but I could see him training for speed and getting it done)
    Last edited by user4; 03-17-2016, 02:29 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • justrunfast
    replied
    Originally posted by Bruce Kritzler View Post
    Carl is doing something. He is a volunteer coach at U. of Houston.
    Guess we shall wait for 8.50+ jumpers to come out of Houston then


    On the talk of NBA players they may have some of the key performance indicators, but some of you are missing the fact that you have to actually be able to run at 10,11 metres per second to get anywhere near the jumps Carl is talking about.

    How many would be able to do this?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bruce Kritzler
    replied
    Originally posted by hipNrip View Post
    Rather than say/do something constructive King Carl goes out of his way to take a gigantic dump on the event he helped revolutionize. As great as he was maybe he should take the initiative and actually do something about it.
    Carl is doing something. He is a volunteer coach at U. of Houston.

    Leave a comment:


  • 26mi235
    replied
    Originally posted by Merner521 View Post
    Sure, there are some amazing athletes in the NBA, but the main talent that most of those guys have is simply being tall.
    There are a lot of tall player in the D league. Athleticism is important, but a key part of it is extreme hand-eye coordination, great reflexes, and even great eye sight (but not like baseball). Those are talents that apply much less specifically to the LJ/HJ. Look at the second-team lower tier player Donal Thomas was -- he had great hops but not great basketball talent.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jacksf
    replied
    I think Carl's dumping on the current crop of Long Jumpers is just a way to bring the spotlight back onto himself and remind everyone how good he was.
    I think he is secretly happy that his record still overshadows today's jumpers.

    If some jumpers were actually threatening his long jump achievements, then I'd think he'd Really be unhappy. His ego wouldn't like that at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave
    replied
    I guess Mr. Lewis thinks the sport should evolve. It hasn't. Of course, most field events peaked out in the 80s and early 90s. It in PV, we only now have people who could have held their own with Bubka(not beat him regularly, but not gotten crushed either).

    From Mr. Lewis' IAAF profile.

    1996 8.50 -1.3 Atlanta (Olympic Stadium), GA 29 JUL
    1994 8.66 +1.4 Sestriere 31 JUL
    1992 8.68 +1.0 Barcelona (Estadio OlĂ­mpico) 05 AUG
    1991 8.87 -0.2 Tokyo (Olympic Stadium) 30 AUG
    1990 8.51 +1.2 Barcelona 16 JUL
    1989 8.54 +0.8 New York, NY 22 JUL
    1988 8.76 +0.8 Indianapolis (University Stadium), IN 18 JUL
    1987 8.75 +1.7 Indianapolis, IN 16 AUG
    1986 8.35 +1.5 Eugene, OR 20 JUN
    1985 8.62 0.0 Bruxelles 30 AUG
    1984 8.71 +0.1 Los Angeles, CA 19 JUN
    1984 8.71 -0.4 Los Angeles (Westwood), CA 13 MAY
    1983 8.79 +1.9 Indianapolis, IN 19 JUN
    1982 8.76 +1.0 Indianapolis, IN 24 JUL
    1981 8.62 +0.8 Sacramento, CA 20 JUN
    1979 8.13 San Juan, PUR 07 JUL

    Leave a comment:


  • hipNrip
    replied
    Rather than say/do something constructive King Carl goes out of his way to take a gigantic dump on the event he helped revolutionize. As great as he was maybe he should take the initiative and actually do something about it.

    Although, based on the list posted by mcgato it would seem that, save once-in-a-lifetime athletes like Lewis and Mike Powell, the current crop of long jumpers are actually doing as well as jumpers from the last 20 years or so (so Carl is talking out of his ass, as usual)

    Leave a comment:


  • dj
    replied
    Originally posted by ExCoastRanger View Post
    Made me think of this...

    "As God as my witness, I thought turkeys could fly."
    Spoken by a Jump(er)!

    Leave a comment:


  • user4
    replied
    Originally posted by mcgato View Post
    Just for fun, I took pela's lists and ran some numbers. The following is: Year, # of 8.20 outdoor legal jumpers, the longest jump, the best mark of the 5th longest jumper, and the best mark of the 10th longest jumper.

    2010: 19 -- 8.47 -- 8.33 -- 8.24
    2011: 22 -- 8.54 -- 8.37 -- 8.28
    2012: 25 -- 8.35 -- 8.29 -- 8.26
    2013: 16 -- 8.56 -- 8.32 -- 8.27
    2014: 10 -- 8.51 -- 8.39 -- 8.23
    2015: 18 -- 8.52 -- 8.38 -- 8.27

    I'll just leave it without comment.

    The only year that stands out in the negative to me is 2012 and I can only spectulate based on the wind and cold that if that Olympics were held anywhere but London it likely would have been one of the more exceptionally positive years.

    Leave a comment:

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