Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

a nice development in the splits department

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • a nice development in the splits department

    as one can find with the Rio "race analysis" link in the official results, Z├╝rich broke out the same kind of data. As in, splits for every 100!

    e.g., the w1500




    you find this by opening an individual event in the Z results and at the top right you'll find two tabs, "splits" and "download"; somewhat counterintuitively, do NOT click on splits! (that gets you the eyebeam kilo times)

    do the pulldown on the download one and you get "race analysis," which gives you the above.

    yow!

  • #2
    I see it for the w1500 but not the w200.

    Comment


    • #3
      it's only available for spots with common split points, otherwise the transponder system gets impossibly complex.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks, gh! I am in hog-splitting heaven!
        Cheers,
        The Mad Splitter

        Comment


        • #5
          Actually this "Race analysis" service has been available at seven of the previous twelve Diamond League meets this year: Doha, Rabat, Rome, Birmingham, Oslo, Stockholm and Monaco.
          Eugene didn't use Swiss Timing at all but why Shanghai, London, Lausanne and Paris didn't issue any "Race analysis" info is a good question.
          As is why this brilliant service hasn't been actively promoted!

          Comment


          • #6
            I went back and looked at Lausanne and Paris and since they didn't have, assumined it was new for the final.

            Why this has been such a well-kept secret (and so hard to find) is indeed a mystery.

            Comment


            • #7
              As it turns out, the splits for the M 5000 are only every 200 meters. Imagine my bitter disappointment! >:-)

              At 3K Kejelcha was about 15 seconds behind Jager. By the time Jager reached 4K in 10:40.2, having passed Kangogo, they were within 10 seconds. With two laps to go, the lead was down to 9 seconds, and Kejelcha was gaining 2 seconds per 200 meters. At the bell, Kejelcha was less than five seconds back, with Rop next and then Gebrhiwet, who lit out after Jager on the backstretch, covering the penultimate 200 in 27.3! He passed Jager as though Evan were standing still, and blasted a 27.2 last 200 to win by almost two seconds over Paul Chelimo, who ran 55.7 for the last lap to take 2nd.

              Cheers,
              Alan Shank (The Mad Splitter)
              Woodland, CA, USA

              Comment

              Working...
              X