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  • Berlin [Bekele 2:03:03]

    Sounds like a significant race, given the main protagonists (Bekele, Mutai).

    I won't be up in the wee hours watching but hoping that NBC or someone will have replays during normal US business hours!
    Last edited by gh; 09-25-2016, 03:20 PM.

  • #2
    It will be live at 3:15am (race start; coverage starts at 2:30am) on the NBC Sports app and NBCSports.com, Sunday morning.

    There will be replays though ... "Encore presentations of the race will air Sunday at 3:30 p.m. ET on Universal HD, and Monday, Sept. 26, at 7:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN."

    Apparently Tim Hutchings and Stuart Storey will be doing the commentary.

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    • #3
      ^ ^ Thanks for the info!

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      • #4
        Incredible race---AND----super fast time!!
        Bekele and Kipsang together----back and forth----last several kilometers----then Bekele sprints--track-style---to the win in 2:03:04----visably pissed he didn't get the WR!!
        Kipsang 9 seconds back, smiling across the line.

        Aberu Kebede on sub-2:19 pace through the half, but fades to 2:20:45 to win by over 3 minutes from Berhane Dibaba.

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        • #5
          Fantastic run by Bekele. Was smart not to go with Kipsang's surges, and then have a great sprint in the end.

          It's amazing how weak the women field is, that the commentators don't give a damn about them. Can the race organisers get more women like Keitany, Sumgong, Kiplagat, just like what happen in London? They can try to aim for Radcliffe's 2:17.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by HasBeenNeverWas View Post
            There will be replays though ... "Encore presentations of the race will air Sunday at 3:30 p.m. ET on Universal HD, and Monday, Sept. 26, at 7:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN."
            I wonder how many people will actually watch the replays. I can't imagine watching a marathon when I already know the results. (I must say that I almost never watch any track and field events when I know the results.)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Juicy News View Post
              It's amazing how weak the women field is, that the commentators don't give a damn about them. Can the race organisers get more women like Keitany, Sumgong, Kiplagat, just like what happen in London? They can try to aim for Radcliffe's 2:17.
              It is not just about recruiting better runners. London starts elite women 45 minutes before the men. That means that the entire focus can be on the women for about the first third of their race, and the women's winner will arrive about a half hour before the men's winner, with the gaps clearly visible.
              I disagree with the comment about the commentators. It was entirely the choice of the race organizers to start the races together. The men's race was mesmerizing, two hours of pure entertainment. The women's race had the leaders in a sea of 2:20 guys. I'm not surprised the feed, which I'm pretty sure the commentators do not control, focused on the men.
              As far as taking down a record, IAAF Rule 260.1: "except for Field events conducted as provided in Rule 147, no performance set by an athlete will be ratified if it has been accomplished during a mixed competition."
              That rule precludes Kebede having a personal male pacesetter handing her drinks, among other assistance, and makes the women's race a women's race.
              Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Master403 View Post
                It is not just about recruiting better runners. London starts elite women 45 minutes before the men. That means that the entire focus can be on the women for about the first third of their race, and the women's winner will arrive about a half hour before the men's winner, with the gaps clearly visible.
                I disagree with the comment about the commentators. It was entirely the choice of the race organizers to start the races together. The men's race was mesmerizing, two hours of pure entertainment. The women's race had the leaders in a sea of 2:20 guys. I'm not surprised the feed, which I'm pretty sure the commentators do not control, focused on the men.
                As far as taking down a record, IAAF Rule 260.1: "except for Field events conducted as provided in Rule 147, no performance set by an athlete will be ratified if it has been accomplished during a mixed competition."
                That rule precludes Kebede having a personal male pacesetter handing her drinks, among other assistance, and makes the women's race a women's race.
                Fair point regarding the commentators, but I still think that the quality of women's field can be so much deeper.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Master403 View Post
                  As far as taking down a record, IAAF Rule 260.1: "except for Field events conducted as provided in Rule 147, no performance set by an athlete will be ratified if it has been accomplished during a mixed competition."
                  That provision does not apply to road running events. Rule 261 includes this note:

                  >>Except Race Walking competitions, IAAF shall keep two World
                  Records for women in Road Races: a World Record for performance
                  achieved in mixed gender (“Mixed”) races and a World Record for
                  performance achieved in single gender (“Women only”) races.<<

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                  • #10
                    I think the Berlin organizers/sponsors tend to put their $$ into a WR-chasing men's field. As deep as their pockets may be, their priorities seem to be on assembling and supporting such a men's field, which cannot be inexpensive. There have been some great women's times in this event's history, but fields have not been all that deep (I mean -- depth in terms of world-conquering elite women) on that side of the competition. Only twice (2008, 2014) have we seen at Berlin more than one woman under 2:22.

                    One note on the women's side -- perhaps everyone knows this -- but Katharina Heinig, 5th in 2:28:34 (nearly 5 1/2 minute PB) is the daughter of Katrin Dorre-Heinig, who is still #3 on GER a-t list. (Her daughter is now #14 on that list.)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tandfman View Post
                      That provision does not apply to road running events. Rule 261 includes this note:

                      >>Except Race Walking competitions, IAAF shall keep two World Records for women in Road Races: a World Record for performance achieved in mixed gender (“Mixed”) races and a World Record for performance achieved in single gender (“Women only”) races.<<
                      You are correct. Thank you. (IAAF Rules should cross-reference this other exception.)

                      That brings up another reason that London might have an advantage in recruiting a strong field: World Record bonuses. To break a World Record in Berlin requires better than 2:15:25. In London the target is under 2:17:42.
                      Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants

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                      • #12
                        It makes one wonder how Bekele would have fared in Rio, and if Kipchoge's tactics would have changed. Hard not to imagine Kipchoge still winning the gold, but Bekele may have taken the silver?

                        Then again, this also highlights the massive difference between a carefully planned and paced record attempt and the non-paced, tactical environment of the Olympics.
                        Last edited by bobguild76; 09-25-2016, 05:28 PM.

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                        • #13
                          REALLY would have liked to see a sharp Bekele at Rio. Some Ethiopian track officials must be cringing today.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by bobguild76 View Post
                            I....
                            Then again, this also highlights the massive difference between a carefully planned and paced record attempt and the non-paced, tactical environment of the Olympics.
                            and I'll take the latter any day.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by gh View Post
                              and I'll take the latter any day.
                              Amen to that!!!!!

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