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Bekele smashes triple record

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  • Bekele smashes triple record

    Don't know what the point values involved are, but Bekele has surely put the 5000/10,000/marathon PR triple out of reach for a long time. Another 'record' taken away from Geb.

    Who are the top 5 or so all-time triple distance runners? And if a quadruple with the half-marathon included, Bekele ought to be way ahead here too, correct?

  • #2
    How about a quad? Geb 3:31.76 vs. Bekele 3:32.35

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Fielding Melish View Post
      Don't know what the point values involved are, but Bekele has surely put the 5000/10,000/marathon PR triple out of reach for a long time. Another 'record' taken away from Geb.

      Who are the top 5 or so all-time triple distance runners? And if a quadruple with the half-marathon included, Bekele ought to be way ahead here too, correct?
      Geb has a much faster half marathon PB. (58:55 vs. 1:01:11)

      Kipchoge and Telgat should be among the top 5 as well. The fifth one is probably Moses Mosop.

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      • #4
        Some of the top marathon guys---Kimetto for one---don't have track times---or FAST track times---to compare.
        According to my 2016 Athletics Annual bio of him, Kimetto's best 10K (ROAD!!) is 28:21---no track 5K's or 10K's listed!
        Just one example.

        But happy to see you (above posters) just adding TIMES to get Best All-Around, rather than relying on an arbitrary points system!

        With just the 5000, 10000, and the Marathon in this grouping, I think the fastest would be---

        1 Bekele (12:37, 26:17, 2:03:03)
        2. Kipchoge (12:46, 26:49, 2:03:05)
        3. Geb (12:39, 26:22, 2:03:59)

        Kipsang's best 5 & 10 are just 13:55 & 28:37 (2016 AA).
        Rupp will be on the list when/if he runs a sub-2:05.
        Ditto with Farah.
        Last edited by aaronk; 09-27-2016, 10:08 PM.

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        • #5
          I think the 5k time should be multiplied by 8.439 and the 10k time should be multiplied by 4.2195, if you want to add the raw time. And if you do that, Geb would be ahead of Kipchoge.

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          • #6
            adding raw times is ludicrous methodology: skews the value of improvement every time you go to a longer distance.

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            • #7
              Despite he fact that IAAF wrongly assigns more points to indoor performances, if you discount Geb's runs on banked tracks, kipchoge and Bekele are faster at both 15 and 'thon.

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              • #8
                One simple methodology is to average the 'per kilometer' times. That is convert the marks to minutes/km and then average across the several events. You can do the same with the sprints but make it seconds/100m for more natural sense. In these cases, the longer events might have marginally more weight but it is the relative performance that matters almost entirely. For the sprints, of course, there is the raw time and the Basic (wind-adjusted and altitude adjusted) time.

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                • #9
                  numbers-geek methodologies don't fly well with the average schlub in the street (you rang?!)

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                  • #10
                    This schlub's conclusion: When you estimate the time for any distance from the time for another distance, you are just estimating.

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                    • #11
                      When you read a watch for the time of the event you are just estimating also. The thing is that there are good estimates and not-s-good estimates. However, the methodology for assessing the best long distance or sprinter (e.g., using IAAF points or averaging pace/km or /100m) is not an estimation, it is a method of obtaining an aggretate that might be useful (who might be the best sprinter over the sprint distances, etc).

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 26mi235 View Post
                        One simple methodology is to average the 'per kilometer' times. That is convert the marks to minutes/km and then average across the several events.
                        Originally posted by gh View Post
                        numbers-geek methodologies don't fly well with the average schlub in the street (you rang?!)
                        Then again most schlubs don't post here, so for a few geekoidal types take 26mi's suggestion and average km times for 5, 10, half and full thon, add and divide by four, then take 1500 PR and create a ratio of km pace to 1500 PR. :-P
                        Last edited by ; 09-28-2016, 02:00 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 26mi235 View Post
                          One simple methodology is to average the 'per kilometer' times. That is convert the marks to minutes/km and then average across the several events. You can do the same with the sprints but make it seconds/100m for more natural sense. In these cases, the longer events might have marginally more weight but it is the relative performance that matters almost entirely.
                          Pretty much what speed skating does; though they use seconds/500m.

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                          • #14
                            Bekele's 1500 PR is 85.64% of the pace he averaged for each 1.5km (4:07.95) in his 5000, 10 000, half marathon, and marathon PRs. Feel free to correct my math if needed.

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                            • #15
                              This is what I got using pela's lists (I sorted by the sum of their position on the all-time lists):

                              12:37.35 - 26:17.53 - 2:03:03 - Kenenisa Bekele
                              12:39.36 - 26:22.75 - 2:03:59 - Haile Gebrselassie
                              12:46.53 - 26:49.02 - 2:03:05 - Eliud Kipchoge
                              12:49.87 - 26:27.85 - 2:04:55 - Paul Tergat
                              12:54.46 - 26:49.55 - 2:03:06 - Moses Mosop
                              12:52.80 - 26:52.33 - 2:04:53 - Gebre-egziabher Gebremariam
                              12:50.25 - 27:02.62 - 2:05:30 - Abderrahim Goumri
                              12:53.46 - 26:54.64 - 2:06:00 - Mark Kiptoo

                              Note that Mosop's marathon is downhill with a tailwind, but he does have a 2:05:03 backup.

                              Top Americans at this point:
                              12:56.27 - 27:22.28 - 2:07:47 - Dathan Ritzenhein
                              12:58.90 - 26:44.36 - 2:10:05 - Galen Rupp

                              Rupp may catch Ritz with a good marathon time.

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