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  • Australian Nitro Meet

    Nary a word about this 'future-of-the-sport' meet with Bolt in it?

    The format underwhelms me, but let's keep an open mind. If it puts fannies in seats, which it did, there may be something there.

    The results were decidedly non-TNTish, with the possible exception of Kara Winger's 200' JT.

    http://nitroathletics.com.au/app/upl...-1-results.pdf
    Last edited by Atticus; 02-05-2017, 07:46 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    Nary a word about this 'future-of-the-sport' meet with Bolt in it?

    The format underwhelms me, but let's keep an open mind. If it puts fannies in seats, which it did, there may be something there.

    The results were decidedly non-TNTish, with the possible exception of Kara Winger's 200' JT.

    http://nitroathletics.com.au/app/upl...-1-results.pdf
    I wrote about it extensively in my blog yesterday----if that counts for anything!
    But generally, my bottom line was/is---
    great for entertainment, but NYET for being T&F's future!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by aaronk View Post
      NYET for being T&F's future!
      You and I will be providing nutrients for bug and plant alike when the future arrives and this may be it (entertainment over 'pure' athletics).

      Comment


      • #4
        If entertainment is not part of the sport's future, it will have limited future.

        FWIW, I've read a number of comments on Twitter today from people who's kids, friends' kids, neighbors, etc. were not track fans, saw the meet on tv, and really enjoyed it--would watch it again.

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        • #5
          The event got a lot more coverage down here in Australia than we've seen for such meetings in recent years. It actually provided more entertainment that I expected, and despite some hiccups, the TV coverage wasn't too bad. Some of the innovations worked quite well such as interviews mid-event in PV, LJ etc, various mixed relays. The TV coverage allowed athletes' personalities to come through (and they thankfully avoided most of the irritating backstory dramatics). As no one is too precious about their performance there is more scope to be natural and engaging. That will do the Aussie athletes some good in terms of possibly building a public profile.

          Friends who attended (I missed ticket sales) said the kids and non-hardcore fans seemed really engaged. Of course, from a purist's perspectives there was zero to get excited about, but there are enough other meets in the year for that stuff.

          I could see this concept working in most markets with sufficient media and athlete buy in. Bolt has an ownership stake in the actual "product" here, so if he actively helps to roll it out, it could get some traction.

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          • #6
            I wonder how much the success of the meet was because Usain Bolt was there? Without Bolt would there have been hype, television, media, fans attending ....?

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            • #7
              Unfortunately, having Bolt as part of it makes it not a fair test; he can fill a decent sized stadium just by showing up to scratch his head.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by AS View Post
                The event got a lot more coverage down here in Australia than we've seen for such meetings in recent years. It actually provided more entertainment that I expected, and despite some hiccups, the TV coverage wasn't too bad.
                Apparently, not everyone enjoyed it.

                https://inews.co.uk/essentials/sport...es-revolution/

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                • #9
                  I haven't watched any of the nitro meet, simply because i don't care. My problem with it as with many other ideas is: Coe, Hansen and their predecessors call everything revolutionary, just because it's different. Coe called nitro revolutionary before the first event, without having seen a single second of it. Hansen promises a new revolutionary qualification system for ECs, which even insiders of the EAA don't know yet how it is supposed to work. 10 Years ago the switch from European Cup to Team ECs and the new format (anyone remember the elimination race, yes, we had them way before nitro) was revolutionary, it would be very difficult to find anyone nowadays calling the Team ECs a revolution for the sport. And the people talking about revolutionising our sport are the same who are considering replacing the decathlon with an ocathlon and who think "I run clean" bibs are the best thing ever to happen to anti-doping efforts.
                  That inews article has it spot on, athletics is a very simple sport, who runs fastest, jump or throws best, wins. But all these new formats are making it a lot more complicated and if complicated is a good thing then maybe we should somehow implement Bamboozle.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gh View Post
                    Unfortunately, having Bolt as part of it makes it not a fair test; he can fill a decent sized stadium just by showing up to scratch his head.
                    I agree. Bolt's presence has certainly dominated all coverage locally. Three meets on prime time television does give some chance to build up the profiles of other participants (bring out Prandini and Lawson could be seen as longer-term play, for example). Ryan Gregson and Gen LaCaze as the Aussie co-captains are both suitably charismatic, as is Morgan Mitchell.

                    The TV coverage drew in 1.4m viewers nationally in Australia. That's a pretty decent outcome in a market of 23m, and up there with mainstream sports screening on a Saturday evening.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by AS View Post
                      I agree. Bolt's presence has certainly dominated all coverage locally. Three meets on prime time television does give some chance to build up the profiles of other participants (bring out Prandini and Lawson could be seen as longer-term play, for example). Ryan Gregson and Gen LaCaze as the Aussie co-captains are both suitably charismatic, as is Morgan Mitchell.

                      The TV coverage drew in 1.4m viewers nationally in Australia. That's a pretty decent outcome in a market of 23m, and up there with mainstream sports screening on a Saturday evening.
                      The most interesting thing for me was the positive recommendation by some random TV writer in the local rag's TV guide to watch the next instalment. It might actually be interesting as a product. Well, it's either that or Steffensen slipper her a few $s.

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