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  • Another HT casualty

    Sorry if already posted. What an event! Wear a helmet! Hold it at 6 am! No spectators allowed!

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.90d0f257b73f

  • #2
    Originally posted by BillVol View Post
    Sorry if already posted. What an event! Wear a helmet! Hold it at 6 am! No spectators allowed!

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.90d0f257b73f
    I assume you're being sarcastic, and I have to say you've picked a fairly sad story to do it on. Regardless of the circumstances, there is a grieving family, campus, and I can't even imagine what must be going through the head of the poor fellow who threw it.

    Indications I've heard was that he wandered into the open competition area, unaware that the event was going on. Just awful.

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    • #3
      Story in today's Chi Tribune that ties in with eyewitness account elsewhere. Putting accounts together: 19 yo student killed was working the hammer event. He was a "volunteer" in the sense he was unpaid, but his duties may have been required as part of his participation in the athletic program (he was a soccer player).

      The student's duties on the day did involve venturing into the hammer landing area (either to retrieve the implement or aid in measuring, or both) but he was not in the designated area at the time of the incident.

      The throw that struck the student occurred during warmups between flights and was errant. The responsible law enforcement official describes the throw as "off angle" and, according to one account, the student was standing perhaps 15 feet outside the official landing area when fatally struck.

      Tribune article has comment from a track coach/professor who has written on the subject, pointing out that NCAA requirements for hammer cage size are not as stringent as those of the IAAF.

      http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...424-story.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by BillVol View Post
        Sorry if already posted. What an event! Wear a helmet! Hold it at 6 am! No spectators allowed!

        https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.90d0f257b73f
        Not a good time for sarcasm Bill.

        A friend of mine was killed 18 months ago when he took his eye off the thrower (shot) and bent down to pick up the shot he thrown moments earlier. He was standing just outside the sector and the shot ht him in the head as he was bent down.

        This week we have had the World Masters Games and we have had hundreds of volunteers who have never officiated at TNF meets officiating at all of the events. It is actually quite frightening to watch these volunteers out there retrieving the throwing implements and seeing them walk away from the circle/line with their backs to you, or standing out there and then turn their head to watch the finish of an exciting race as the spectators scream and yell.

        We were very conscious of the young man killed and every throwing event had at least 8 officials, and one of them was designated to ensure all officials out in the sector were always facing the throwing circle/line and that a thrower was not allowed in the circle until all officials were watching front on.

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        • #5
          Hammer seems especially dangerous. So much momentum creates release control issues and cage/netting placement and construction can cause havoc from hundreds of feet away to within the throwing ring.
          Recall that a dozen years ago future NCAA shot champion Noah Bryant suffered near-fatal injuries when he released a fraction early and the hammer rebounded off a screen directly back into his face.
          All you have to see is a hammer disappear into damp sod on landing gain a serious respect for that flying ball and chain.

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          • #6
            Of course this is why the hammer was only once thrown, in 1978, at Hayward until the Trials last year. And even then on an off day.

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            • #7
              I venture to say that at the collegiate level, there are also many inexperienced hammer throwers, more prone to disasters inside the cage, as well as more out of the sector throws.

              Like 16 year olds driving cars.

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              • #8
                The hammer throws are rarely under the influence...

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                • #9
                  an event whose exit to the dustbin is long long long overdue. Men should add the 35lb weight throw instead.

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                  • #10
                    re the above, it's 35 INdoors, 56 OUTdoors.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by user4 View Post
                      an event whose exit to the dustbin is long long long overdue. Men should add the 35lb weight throw instead.
                      I love the hammer. My dream before the next NZ Masters season is to execute 3 turns without falling over. And getting to 40m

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by user4 View Post
                        an event whose exit to the dustbin is long long long overdue. Men should add the 35lb weight throw instead.
                        agree...this now moves to the top of the list for OG elimination if they need to stream line

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                        • #13
                          Didn't Ed Burke once take a hammer to the face. IIRC my old friend, the late George Frenn, told me a story about that happening many years ago.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
                            Of course this is why the hammer was only once thrown, in 1978, at Hayward until the Trials last year. And even then on an off day.
                            hold it night before meet "starts" with extra security...only a handful of people the next day would really care, especially in U.S.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The hammer is one of the best events in track and field. Safety procedures have to be followed. The discus is much more dangerous.

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