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  • DrJay
    replied
    Sprout soloed a 9:01.53 for 3200 at his league meet at altitude in Denver this weekend. That breaks the Colorado all-classification state record of 9:04 last year by Tanner Norman. Not sure how it compares to his 8:13 3000 at sea level in Eugene. Also won in 1:56.61 and 4:17.31. I'm guessing these were on three separate days as the meet ran May 2- May 5 per Milesplit and I can't tell which events were on which days.

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  • DrJay
    replied
    Right now Colorado has four of the 13 fastest 1600 runners in the country. It would be five if Michael Mooney would jump into a good race.

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  • tandfman
    replied
    Kohlrabi

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  • DrJay
    replied
    OK, I got the Brussels Sprout pun, but can't get the (Robby?) Andrews one..

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  • DrJay
    replied
    Interview with Sprout:

    The 2023 Oregon Relays presented by AthleticNET will be held April 21-22!Meet InfoBIG thanks to!University of Oregon Nike Eugene, Cascades & Coast Track Town Pizza Oregon Track Club Wild Duck Cafe

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  • Master Po
    replied
    Originally posted by maggot View Post
    Aha!=aha*(aha-1)*(aha-2)*...*3*2*1

    OK. But how does this play out with Wham!?

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  • player
    replied
    Originally posted by br View Post
    Just wondering how it compares to Eric Hulst's 8:50.6 2-mile from 1974?
    By standard 1.08 conversion = 8:52.1

    On world level, from same era as Hulst, Hansjorg Kunze ran 7:56.4 (8:34.5) at age 16y 6mo in June 1976.

    In looking up Kunze, came across a tidbit of which I was previously unaware and will share.

    At age 21, at Rieti '81, Kunze ran 13:10.4 to defeat Henry Rono, the reigning 5000m WRH; the winning time was only two seconds off the WR Rono had set in 1978.

    Four days later, no doubt annoyed at the loss, Rono lowered his WR to 13:06 at a meet in Norway.

    Kunze was no flash: went on to medal at Worlds in '83 and '87 and at Seoul in '88.

    And, speaking of Drew Hunter, I am impatiently waiting for him to get on with being a 5000m runner, and stop playing around with the 1500m/mile.
    Last edited by player; 04-14-2018, 10:42 PM.

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  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    can I be the first to ask what we'll say when Master Sprout runs in the Van Damme Memorial for the first time?
    And how will the announcer call the race when he's leading Mister Andrews?

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  • DrJay
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    can I be the first to ask what we'll say when Master Sprout runs in the Van Damme Memorial for the first time?
    And what if Cole runs for UTEP?

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    5920! =



    Of course that is only the first 130 or so digits...
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 04-14-2018, 10:24 PM.

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  • DrJay
    replied
    Good one!

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  • gh
    replied
    can I be the first to ask what we'll say when Master Sprout runs in the Van Damme Memorial for the first time?

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  • maggot
    replied
    Aha!=aha*(aha-1)*(aha-2)*...*3*2*1

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  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by 26mi235 View Post
    The "!" is the math function Factorial. n! = 1*2*3*...*(n-1)*n. It gets large real fast and the symbol has more uses than the one often utilized by aaronk.

    1! =1, 5!= 120, 10!=3,628,800, 15!=~1,310,000,000,000, 50!=10^64, 100!=10^158, 170!=~10^306, so you can sort of 'imagine' how large 5920! is. Note that 10^306 is 1 with 306 zeros before the decimal point.
    I understood the math symbols but I don't understand how all this relates to gh's post. Was this some humor that went over my head because I didn't realize you were joking?

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Use Stirling's Formula and it's done...






    Stirling's approximation gives an approximate value for the factorial function n! or the gamma function Gamma(n) for n>>1. The approximation can most simply be derived for n an integer by approximating the sum over the terms of the factorial with an integral, so that lnn! = ln1+ln2+...+lnn (1) = sum_(k=1)^(n)lnk (2) approx int_1^nlnxdx (3) = [xlnx-x]_1^n (4) = nlnn-n+1 (5) approx nlnn-n. (6) The equation can also be derived using the integral definition of the...



    Or use the Gamma Function...

    Last edited by Conor Dary; 04-14-2018, 09:33 PM.

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