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Accurate Attendance at USATF for each of the 4 days?

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  • MJR
    replied
    This sport, under the direct policy of the leadership nationally and internationally, does everything possible to tick off the rabid fans by alienating them at every level with piles of stupidity. If you're not guzzling their kool-aid (tm), they excommunicate you so as to circle the wagons around their every shrinking fiefdom. It won't end until they're purged from all positions of power.

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  • gm
    replied
    Cutting events isn't going to do anything to improve crowds. It will just tick off the fans who like those events.

    There are way too many activities available today versus in the halcyon days of yore to expect giant crowds. Track and field is a niche sport. That doesn't mean we shouldn't promote the heck out of it and get as many butts in seats as possible, but those mythical hordes of the 60s aren't coming back.

    I have encountered hundreds of high school kids who not only know the sport, but love it. Problem is, they don't have any way to get to the big meets several states away. They would love to go, given the chance.

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  • polevaultpower
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    we had that thought/hope too, but free tickets for the kids weren't much of a carrot.
    I agree that it hasn't worked well in the past, but I still think there is room for improvement in using social media to market directly to kids. Though to be fair, I don't know what efforts were made for this meet.

    I don't think making meets shorter magically fixes anything.

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Not in track it doesn't surprise me....including my nieces and nephew who competed at D1, I can't recall a single high school athlete who knew anything or cared about the sport...

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  • DrJay
    replied
    Hard for me to imagine being a kid, a teenager, and not liking and following the sport that I compete in, be it track or basketball or ice hockey or whatever.

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman View Post
    Boo! Hiss!
    Indeed....better to let the boat just sink....

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  • gh
    replied
    Originally posted by polevaultpower View Post
    My thought was parents bringing kids, not team trips.

    ...t.
    we had that thought/hope too, but free tickets for the kids weren't much of a carrot.

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Originally posted by polevaultpower View Post
    My thought was parents bringing kids, not team trips.

    Seems more plausible than expecting Joe Six Pack who is not really a fan of the sport to get off the couch and show up at the meet.
    Track gets lots of kids competing through high school and still don't care to watch...or follow the sport at all afterwards...unless their friends are in it....

    In Eugene it's parents bringing their children and that sort of connection that works...but dragging kids on their own seems a rather dubious strategy...

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  • DrJay
    replied
    I've always thought that getting HS coaches to sell their kids on watching/attending national and world-class track and field meets was one way to increase interest. But on thinking about it again, I don't know. We have about 20 high schools in the Colorado Springs metro area. I bet less that half the coaches follow track even remotely like we here do. How many get TAFNEWS? I bet 25%, maybe less? If they're not really fans, they're not going to pass on fan-dom. Our metro area population and that of Des Moines are similar (about 3/4 million). If every school got 15 kids and one parent to attend a meet like USATF (and knowing the kids at our HS, that would be a stretch) that would be 600 more in attendance. A good start, if achieved, but it won't suddenly make the sport mainstream, nor be the difference in a city landing a major meet. And how many would attend more than a day or two? Most parents are not T&F fans and have probably had their fill of sitting in the stands by mid-May

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  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
    .personally I would get rid of almost all of the field events...
    Boo! Hiss!

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  • polevaultpower
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    When I was part of Stanford's LOC 20-odd years back when they hosted IAAF GP meet as well as couple of nationals, this was a tactic that was tried. As I recall, the big problem is who takes on the liability (and hassle) for having a passle of underage kids on a field trip that's not in any way an official school activity. Paticularly if school is out.
    My thought was parents bringing kids, not team trips.

    Seems more plausible than expecting Joe Six Pack who is not really a fan of the sport to get off the couch and show up at the meet.

    Leave a comment:


  • Conor Dary
    replied
    I was just talking today with a long time fan about attendance in Eugene and the lack of students at meets...and the biggest obstacle is the complete lack of dual meets which were very popular when I was an undergraduate...we have talked about this before since it is almost impossible with only 12 scholarships on the men's side...

    The real problem is there are way too many events these days...it's like a life boat way too over crowded and will sink unless action is taken and yet the sport still acts like it is the 1960s...personally I would get rid of almost all of the field events...

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  • gh
    replied
    Originally posted by polevaultpower View Post
    I imagine the best realistic bet to increase attendance would be to really hit up the high school track and field community. Figure out how to engage with the coaches and get them to sell it to the athletes. ....
    When I was part of Stanford's LOC 20-odd years back when they hosted IAAF GP meet as well as couple of nationals, this was a tactic that was tried. As I recall, the big problem is who takes on the liability (and hassle) for having a passle of underage kids on a field trip that's not in any way an official school activity. Paticularly if school is out.

    Leave a comment:


  • wamego relays champ
    replied
    Originally posted by polevaultpower View Post

    USATF actually is fairly good with youth engagement for JOs and such, they should apply those skills toward promoting this meet instead of expecting the LOC to do most of the work.
    I think USATF had one or ore 'Run-Jump-Throw" events in Des Moines. That kind of stuff has to help, but it may be a long-term strategy to add fans needed to replace the aging ones as opposed to driving ticket sales at a particular event.

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  • polevaultpower
    replied
    I imagine the best realistic bet to increase attendance would be to really hit up the high school track and field community. Figure out how to engage with the coaches and get them to sell it to the athletes. Maybe a local elite stops by practice and gives out codes for discounted tickets? Use lots of social media promotion to that crowd.

    USATF actually is fairly good with youth engagement for JOs and such, they should apply those skills toward promoting this meet instead of expecting the LOC to do most of the work.

    Leave a comment:

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