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IAAF acts on Transfer of Allegiance

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  • norunner
    replied
    Originally posted by bobguild76 View Post
    All this stems from the limit of three athletes from a particular country per event. What are the chances that will change in our lifetimes?
    What difference does that make? Switching allegiance to Bahrain makes you rich, being the 10th best Kenyan over 10000m at Olympics doesn't.

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  • gh
    replied
    Originally posted by bobguild76 View Post
    All this stems from the limit of three athletes from a particular country per event. What are the chances that will change in our lifetimes?
    zero; bigger chance of its being cut to 2 (at least at the Olympics)

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  • bobguild76
    replied
    All this stems from the limit of three athletes from a particular country per event. What are the chances that will change in our lifetimes?

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  • NotDutra5
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post
    But most athletes living and training in another country don't acquire citizenship in the country AND then want to represent the new country.

    Living in the new country for 3 years shouldn't be the sole reason to waive additional wait time, but those who already have done 3 years in addition to otherwise demonstrating a totality of evidence of a bona fide connection to the country shouldn't have to wait another 3 years. Did they join the new country's military? Marry a citizen of the new country and for how long? Buy a house which is their sole residence? Acquire the new citizenship of their own initiative, rather than being induced by offers of money from the country? Follow the citizenship process in the same way as ordinary applicants, rather than being fast-tracked or having the standard citizenship requirements waived for being an athlete?
    How about having citizenship of a particular country from the moment they are born?

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  • Pego
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post
    But most athletes living and training in another country don't acquire citizenship in the country AND then want to represent the new country.

    Living in the new country for 3 years shouldn't be the sole reason to waive additional wait time, but those who already have done 3 years in addition to otherwise demonstrating a totality of evidence of a bona fide connection to the country shouldn't have to wait another 3 years. Did they join the new country's military? Marry a citizen of the new country and for how long? Buy a house which is their sole residence? Acquire the new citizenship of their own initiative, rather than being induced by offers of money from the country? Follow the citizenship process in the same way as ordinary applicants, rather than being fast-tracked or having the standard citizenship requirements waived for being an athlete?
    Exactly right. These rules do not separate legitimate transfers of citizenship versus mercenary rentals. That said, I personally don't know how to do it.

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  • 18.99s
    replied
    Originally posted by polevaultpower View Post
    I think historically the waiting period referred to how long the athlete had to sit out of international championships, right? Athletes shouldn't have the three years waived solely because they were residing in another country. Tons of athletes live and train in other countries.
    But most athletes living and training in another country don't acquire citizenship in the country AND then want to represent the new country.

    Living in the new country for 3 years shouldn't be the sole reason to waive additional wait time, but those who already have done 3 years in addition to otherwise demonstrating a totality of evidence of a bona fide connection to the country shouldn't have to wait another 3 years. Did they join the new country's military? Marry a citizen of the new country and for how long? Buy a house which is their sole residence? Acquire the new citizenship of their own initiative, rather than being induced by offers of money from the country? Follow the citizenship process in the same way as ordinary applicants, rather than being fast-tracked or having the standard citizenship requirements waived for being an athlete?
    Last edited by 18.99s; 07-29-2018, 11:51 AM.

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  • polevaultpower
    replied
    But yes it definitely is important to know when the three year period can start. If they cannot transfer until age 20 and had to wait until age 20 to apply and had to wait three years, that would effectively mean no athlete could transfer until age 23.

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  • polevaultpower
    replied
    I think historically the waiting period referred to how long the athlete had to sit out of international championships, right? Athletes shouldn't have the three years waived solely because they were residing in another country. Tons of athletes live and train in other countries.

    Leave a comment:


  • NotDutra5
    replied
    Originally posted by bhall View Post
    The key question of when the 3 year waiting period begins is undefined here. I look forward to seeing the actual rule(s). I am glad they have made progress as athletes careers are short.
    It's unclear but, reading between the lines, it does not sound as if the waiting period only begins when the paperwork is completed and filed.

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  • thedoorknobbroke
    replied
    Originally posted by player View Post
    I believe Rai Benjamin last competed for Antigua in spring 2015 at the World Relays.

    He declined to compete for Antigua at Rio in 2016.

    Not sure when he submitted his request to transfer allegiance to USA but hope he will be good to go for 2019 Worlds.

    He should have no problem with the credibility and citizenship requirements.
    certainly by Tokyo but should be by Doha '19..good that he was astute enough to know that he wanted to rep USA in near future

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post
    Someone who already has established bona fide residence in the new country for 3 or more years prior to the transfer request shouldn't have to wait another 3 years.
    Concur 100%. If you've been living there 2+ years already, that's a legit request. Maybe have to sit one year, if you represented another country within the last year.

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  • bhall
    replied
    The key question of when the 3 year waiting period begins is undefined here. I look forward to seeing the actual rule(s). I am glad they have made progress as athletes careers are short.

    Leave a comment:


  • player
    replied
    I believe Rai Benjamin last competed for Antigua in spring 2015 at the World Relays.

    He declined to compete for Antigua at Rio in 2016.

    Not sure when he submitted his request to transfer allegiance to USA but hope he will be good to go for 2019 Worlds.

    He should have no problem with the credibility and citizenship requirements.

    Leave a comment:


  • 18.99s
    replied
    Originally posted by norunner View Post
    The problem with this is, as long as there are ways to circumvent the process, it's useless.
    Depends on what those circumventions are. There should be exceptions.

    An athlete who escaped North Korea shouldn't have to wait 3 more years to represent his/her new country.

    Someone who already has established bona fide residence in the new country for 3 or more years prior to the transfer request shouldn't have to wait another 3 years.

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  • norunner
    replied
    The problem with this is, as long as there are ways to circumvent the process, it's useless.
    In June of 2016 the IAAF published a transfer of allegiance list that included several athletes that transfered to Bahrain. All of these athletes were listed as being ineligible from August 19th 2015 until August 19th 2016, which means they would have missed the Games in Rio. A month later the IAAF published a new version of that list and somehow the period of ineligibility had been reduced by a few days and this reduction allowed them to represent Bahrain in Rio after all. Who's to say the people responsible for this aren't going to be in charge of the new process as well and are still willing to break their own rules?

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