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IAAF Redefining Fouls in Horizontal Jumps

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  • IAAF Redefining Fouls in Horizontal Jumps

    IAAF Council approved amendments 9 June to the Competition Rules, in effect 1 November. The amendments are here:

    https://www.iaaf.org/download/downlo...ovember%202019

    Amendments to Rules 184 and 185 fundamentally redefine what is a foul. Currently the jumper, while taking off, has to contact the ground beyond the takeoff line to commit a foul. Under the new rule, breaking the plane at the takeoff line with the foot or shoe while taking off will be a foul. To that end, the cross-section of the plasticine will be a square, not a triangle, and stick up 7 mm at the takeoff line.

    Any thoughts on this change?
    Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants

  • #2
    Originally posted by Master403 View Post
    IAAF Council approved amendments 9 June to the Competition Rules, in effect 1 November. The amendments are here:

    https://www.iaaf.org/download/downlo...ovember%202019

    Amendments to Rules 184 and 185 fundamentally redefine what is a foul. Currently the jumper, while taking off, has to contact the ground beyond the takeoff line to commit a foul. Under the new rule, breaking the plane at the takeoff line with the foot or shoe while taking off will be a foul. To that end, the cross-section of the plasticine will be a square, not a triangle, and stick up 7 mm at the takeoff line.

    Any thoughts on this change?
    Won't people trip on it?
    Cheers,
    Alan Shank

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    • #3
      Makes sense to me. If I understand the current rule, your shoe tip can clearly be over the vertical plane of the line, but if the plasticene is untouched, it is NOT a foul. I think this is wrong. Over the line is over the line. Good rule change.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Alan Shank View Post
        Won't people trip on it?
        Cheers,
        Alan Shank
        Exactly what I was thinking. It's only a quarter of an inch (and soft plasticene), but why do that? Let the official do his/her job and back it up with the Eagle-Eye camera in big meets (already done at NCAAs).
        Last edited by Atticus; 09-03-2019, 05:28 PM.

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        • #5
          Won't that be a lot harder to enforce?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by dukehjsteve View Post
            Makes sense to me. If I understand the current rule, your shoe tip can clearly be over the vertical plane of the line, but if the plasticene is untouched, it is NOT a foul. I think this is wrong. Over the line is over the line. Good rule change.
            Im going to agree with you for the even simpler reason, that long before plasticene was invented long jump judges were marking fouls by eye.

            Originally posted by Atticus View Post
            Exactly what I was thinking. It's only a quarter of an inch (and soft plasticene), but why do that? Let the official do his/her job and back it up with the Eagle-Eye camera in big meets (already done at NCAAs).
            exactly.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BCBaroo View Post
              Won't that be a lot harder to enforce?
              I assume that at major meets, it will be enforced by technology of some sort. That could make it easy to enforce (although perhaps not as easy as enforcing a rule that defines the violation as touching and then provides a plasticene board that assures that a violation will leave evidence that is visible after the fact).

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              • #8
                One benefit of eliminating the plasticine board is that it would also eliminate the time-consuming task of smoothing and replacing the boards.

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                • #9
                  You'd think in this age a computer could make the determination.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jeremyp View Post
                    You'd think in this age a computer could make the determination.
                    I would indeed.

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                    • #11
                      Good change in that it will eliminate calling as fair the visual fouls where toe rides front spike and does not touch plasticine It will be more difficult to repair minor nicks in plasticine.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Master403 View Post
                        Amendments to Rules 184 and 185 fundamentally redefine what is a foul. Currently the jumper, while taking off, has to contact the ground beyond the takeoff line to commit a foul. Under the new rule, breaking the plane at the takeoff line with the foot or shoe while taking off will be a foul. To that end, the cross-section of the plasticine will be a square, not a triangle, and stick up 7 mm at the takeoff line.

                        Any thoughts on this change?
                        Terrible. And why? The plasticine as currently used already will tell if the tip of the shoe touched the ground past the board, so what problem is this rule change supposed to solve?

                        In any real world long jumping scenario where the edge of the takeoff spot matters (e.g. jumping from one roof to another), if the tip of your shoe crosses the vertical plane of the takeoff surface but doesn't also press downwards into the horizontal plane, you can still make the jump; you don't fall over the edge, because your downward force was contained within the bounds of the surface.

                        What next, will discus throwers be called for fouls if their heel goes outside the cylinder of the circle (without touching the ground)?

                        And they're not rewriting the long jump and triple jump world records for this, so this just unnecessarily adds years to the life expectancy of a set of records which are already older than most of the elite men and women who compete in the events.
                        Originally posted by tandfman View Post
                        One benefit of eliminating the plasticine board is that it would also eliminate the time-consuming task of smoothing and replacing the boards.
                        They're not removing the plasticine, they're only changing the shape of it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It kinda depends on whether you thought the old "touch the ground" or "beyond the plane" rules were fair and equitable. This essentially make both rules "beyond the plane".
                          Ok by me... except for the nuisance of swapping boards with virtully every foul..with the old touch rule, the triangular plasticine would always catch the 1/16" foul and frequently miss the 2" foul.
                          Last edited by lonewolf; 09-04-2019, 12:48 AM.

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                          • #14
                            elemental question: in this day and age, how common is plasticine? Assume rarely if ever used at HS level (other than "national lchamps" meets). How about at the NCAA level?

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                            • #15
                              Was commonly used at most NCAA meets for a couple of years about 10-12 years ago, seldom see it now... don't recall ever seeing at HS meet

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