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IAAF Redefining Fouls in Horizontal Jumps

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Tuariki View Post
    I am one of those former jumpers who agrees with the new rule. If you break the plane it is a foul. And in this age of computer TV technology it makes no sense to continue with the old, when the average Joe Blow TV watcher sees a jumper obviously breaking the plane but is then informed it was a legal jump from "behind" the foul line.
    With the current technology, this makes sense. But you should know that there were some former jumpers (and coaches) who liked the "touching" rule because it was more objective and less subject to officiating error.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Tuariki View Post
      I am one of those former jumpers who agrees with the new rule. If you break the plane it is a foul. And in this age of computer TV technology it makes no sense to continue with the old, when the average Joe Blow TV watcher sees a jumper obviously breaking the plane but is then informed it was a legal jump from "behind" the foul line.
      But any form of somersaulting is still a foul. Should we fix that next?
      Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants

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      • #33
        Originally posted by tandfman View Post

        With the current technology, this makes sense. But you should know that there were some former jumpers (and coaches) who liked the "touching" rule because it was more objective and less subject to officiating error.
        Yep, plasticine and no touch is for timid, cya officials hesitant to call the close ones. OTOH, I have witnessed flagrant home cooking in calling visual fouls.. not always able to intervene.... Instant camera is the most reliable but is not universally available.. I am now seeing board judges consulting the monitor before making even the simplest of calls... but, the world must move in pursuing perfection in long jump foul detection.... I am not always around and cannot call every meet.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by lonewolf View Post

          Yep, plasticine and no touch is for timid, cya officials hesitant to call the close ones. OTOH, I have witnessed flagrant home cooking in calling visual fouls.. not always able to intervene.... Instant camera is the most reliable but is not universally available.. I am now seeing board judges consulting the monitor before making even the simplest of calls... but, the world must move in pursuing perfection in long jump foul detection.... I am not always around and cannot call every meet.
          TV can be misleading, but there have been times where it appeared that the official displayed a tiny imperfection in the plasticine to a jumper, and on replay it looks like that isn't where the foot was near the board. Have you seen cases where the officials didn't smooth the plasticene well, or handled it clumsily?
          Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Master403 View Post

            TV can be misleading, but there have been times where it appeared that the official displayed a tiny imperfection in the plasticine to a jumper, and on replay it looks like that isn't where the foot was near the board. Have you seen cases where the officials didn't smooth the plasticine well, or handled it clumsily?
            Yes, incompetent officials make bad plasticine calls .. fair and foul . quick, skillful.plasticine preparation is an art that many otherwise good officials do not possess. . the board official should have a mental image of the plasticine before the jump, just as pit judge should memorize imperfections in the landing area before a jump so he/she does not miss hand drags or penalize jumper for marks jumper did not cause... for twenty years, I was fortunate to work with two of the best plasticine artists in the game, one from Texas, one from Penn, who were selected for the Olympic Horizontal crew for their skill..
            Last edited by lonewolf; 05-13-2020, 05:07 AM.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Master403 View Post

              But any form of somersaulting is still a foul. Should we fix that next?
              Of course somersaulting should be allowed. There was never any logical reason to ban it. The claims of injury risk were disingenuous at best. If those claims were valid you woukd ban HJ, PV and all gymnastics.

              The WR would quickly go past 9m.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Tuariki View Post
                Of course somersaulting should be allowed. There was never any logical reason to ban it. The claims of injury risk were disingenuous at best. If those claims were valid you woukd ban HJ, PV and all gymnastics.The WR would quickly go past 9m.
                The real problem that I see is that if LJ somersault were legal, all the yahoo HS boys (some of which don't have the requisite coordination to pull it off) would want to try it and there would inevitably be neck injuries as they were trying to master it, Having coached HJ and PV for over 25 years, the worst injuries I have seen were sprained ankles, because as they are learning it, they are at low heights. Somersaulting at speed into sand is disaster waiting to happen for those who can't pull it off.

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                • #38
                  Of course banning it was the right decision.....tumbling into a sand pit 15 feet away with hard ground in between? And expect everyone to get it right....you'd need an ambulance at every high school meet.

                  Go to a gymnastics practice and see the misses....at least they have pads.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Tuariki View Post

                    Of course somersaulting should be allowed. There was never any logical reason to ban it. The claims of injury risk were disingenuous at best. If those claims were valid you would ban HJ, PV and all gymnastics.

                    The WR would quickly go past 9m.
                    Tuariki, you may know Danny Brabam, retired Baylor coach, who I estimate is about your vintage. Danny, a consistent 26 foot jumper, said he experimented with somersaulting when it was briefly in vogue and was instantly transformed into a 24 foot jumper... and Danny had the physical tools and coordination to pull it off... the only person I know who could catch a javelin with either hand.
                    Last edited by lonewolf; 05-17-2020, 06:00 AM.

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