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¶2019 wWC 10K: Sifan Hassan (Netherlands) 30:16.52 (WL)

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  • Country Mile
    replied
    Originally posted by Awsi Dooger View Post
    Zero suspense from the opening 5 steps. The women's 10,000 is a disgraceful race when Almaz Ayana is not present. She is the only one with the guts to push the pace. Today it would have been absolutely fascinating with a healthy Ayana out there. Obiri and Hassan would have been forced to go with her, debating throughout how close they needed to be, and whether Ayana could fully sustain.
    I wonder if Gidey may eventually follow in Ayana's shoes. She was the only one in the race who showed any true initiative in that kind of vein, and the spine to back it up and take the race by the scruff of the neck. Currently, she's still developing at age 21, and at her present level of fitness would not have been able to pull off the kind of sustained, Ayana-style "red line" drive from 5K to 8K out that it would take to force the hand of athletes like Hassan or Obiri early on. Of course, at Hassan's current level of fitness, even a completely fit Ayana might have failed.


    Gidey appears to have a significantly better kick than Ayana, but right now it's not on the level of an Obiri or Hassan, and might never be. With that in mind, I wonder if her behavior in this race could be a harbinger of things to come. Her move when she made it was blistering and she kept the pedal to the metal all the way to the finish, never second-guessing herself. I almost wondered whether Gidey might have in fact actually been taking a bit of a cue from Ayana here with her line-in-the-sand push from 4 laps out, but knew that would be the best she could do, for now.

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  • TN1965
    replied
    Originally posted by dinamo View Post
    I really liked how Hassan didn't try and close the gaps too fast just reeled it back in. Gidey looks to have a bright future ahead of her.
    I think this is one of the biggest areas of improvement that she made since joining NOP. Only two years ago, she made a mad dash to glory in the backstretch of 1500 that cost her a medal.

    Leave a comment:


  • El Toro
    replied
    Originally posted by Alan Shank View Post
    The "Race Analysis" files are really weird. For the 800s,
    I think you are too kind. I would classify them as a complete fucking shambles.

    It perfectly highlights the irresolvable confusion of the IAAF in relation to data. They have a reasonable idea but then half arse it because they don't have a sensible strategy.

    Who are the targets for the information and what would they want to do with it?

    The answer is coaches, sport scientists and stats analysts are the target, and they want to be able to put the data into a spreadsheet or other package and play with it.

    The IAAF solution for the use case? Fucking .pdf files in wierd formats with missing data!

    Leave a comment:


  • eightsevensix
    replied
    Originally posted by OneWay View Post
    It's a fight between Hassan, SMU and Rojas. The IAAF has done SMU no favors by preventing her from doubling.
    Rojas would need to win with a big distance here. She was beaten in Zurich. Hasan has dominated.

    Leave a comment:


  • 26mi235
    replied
    Since going to Salazar's group Hassan has gotten stronger with much better running form, especially arm carriage. Watch out what another year will bring once her increased strength allows here further improvements in form. A sub-4:00 1500 in a race that was almost under 30:00 and might have been if you take off the first 3-4 laps.

    As for Ayana, training to run as fast as she did puts a big stress on the body and the increased odds on getting injured is part of the bargain.

    Leave a comment:


  • etuoyo
    replied
    Originally posted by OneWay View Post
    It's a fight between Hassan, SMU and Rojas. The IAAF has done SMU no favors by preventing her from doubling.
    Given how these things work (IAAF rather than a panel of experts /journalists) the winner in a close match up is likely to be the one that can sell more. So beauty and sprinter will have the advantage.

    Leave a comment:


  • Awsi Dooger
    replied
    Zero suspense from the opening 5 steps. The women's 10,000 is a disgraceful race when Almaz Ayana is not present. She is the only one with the guts to push the pace. Today it would have been absolutely fascinating with a healthy Ayana out there. Obiri and Hassan would have been forced to go with her, debating throughout how close they needed to be, and whether Ayana could fully sustain.

    Instead it was a glorified handout to Hassan. Once the pace was dawdling the only conceivable outcome was a rerun of that Diamond League final a few weeks ago, with Hassan waiting until the final lap to sprint clear, while Hellen Obiri comically faded to deserved irrelevance.

    I mentioned the other day that this meet set up perfectly for Hassan, as long as she understood to bypass Faith Kipyegon in the 1500. Ayana's absence totally altered the 10,000 and how much energy Hassan would have to expend in that race.

    Gee, that's a tough call...challenge Hellen Obiri at 5000 or Faith Kipyegon at 1500. One of them flattens out with the stiff robotic nowherseville action and the other one simply outclasses you and won't let you pass, no matter the comparative times from earlier in the season.

    Tokyo desperately needs a healthy Ayana. She changes the dynamic of the women's 10,000 like no other athlete in any event. Female distance events in track and swimming have been a jogfest farce for as long as I have followed both sports. The athletes get complacent into believing that's all they have to give, and somehow the coaches and commentators allow them to get away with it. Then when someone understands they can push the barrier like Ayana, other athletes whine amidst cynicism. It's almost like they are complaining that she doesn't merely sit back and jog 75 second laps like the rest of them.

    Cant we all be happy?

    At least in swimming once Katie Ledecky changed the distance dynamic you've now got young swimmers who understand they need to follow suit, like Ariarne Titmus and Simona Quadarella. Not so in track. The other 10,000 women want Ayana to go away or remain injured, so they can lope in packs and turn heads to watch the nearby field events.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by OneWay View Post
    It's a fight between Hassan, SMU and Rojas. The IAAF has done SMU no favors by preventing her from doubling.
    Hassan and it's not close IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • Alan Shank
    replied
    The "Race Analysis" files are really weird. For the 800s, some of them show a 300-meter time and a 100-meter segment time from which you can derive the 200 time. Others have a 200 times. For the 10,000, they've got every 100 meters, but the heading is all jumbled. There was no race-analysis file for the W SC heats, and none for the 400H, which had those files for some of the DL meets.

    Gidey ran 4:04.68 for her last 1500, compared to her PB of 4:11.11; of course, she has only raced the 1500 once, in 2017. She has that 8:20.27 from Pre, another race that she made for Hassan, and the Brussels 5000.

    I wonder how a fully-fit Ayana would have run the race.

    An IAAF news article has this sentence:
    "And there could be more gold to come for her here as she now targets the 5000m." This article is by Mike Rowbottom; OTOH, the "Report", by Steve Landells, says: "Hassan will decide with her coach whether to opt for the 1500m or the 5000m." I wonder whether Rowbottom actually has heard from or her coach/agent, or is just blowing smoke?
    Cheers,
    Alan Shank
    Last edited by Alan Shank; 09-29-2019, 12:55 AM. Reason: additional info

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    not my line, but as received in a text message: <<when an Aussie pronounces Gidey, is the i silent?>>

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  • bobguild76
    replied
    Originally posted by dinamo View Post
    I really liked how Hassan didn't try and close the gaps too fast just reeled it back in. Gidey looks to have a bright future ahead of her.
    I was thinking the same thing. She didn't cover Giday's move too quickly, but rather took a while to reel her back in. No panic, especially as she knew there was plenty of time.

    Leave a comment:


  • booond
    replied
    Originally posted by Country Mile View Post
    Really bold, gutsy and impressive tactical move and execution by Gidey in blowing the race open with 1500m to go. She didn't falter a bit. Very even pace from the time she put in her initial acceleration, all the way to the end. Just doesn't possess the kick Hassan does. Not only did she get the utmost out of herself but really made that race by throwing down the gauntlet in dramatic fashion. Kudos for that silver at 21 years of age. No fear.
    She knew what she had to do to win and went for it. Great moment in the race.

    Leave a comment:


  • Big Tusk
    replied
    Originally posted by LopenUupunut View Post
    Hassan was 26:00.4 at 8400, so she ran the last 1600 in 4:17.2 (and the last mile around 4:18.7). Of course she did have a flying start.
    Her last 1500 was 3’59”09–a time that only 7 women not named Hassan have surpassed this year. What’s the male equivalent? Both in placement on this year’s world list and on the points chart? I’m thinking 3’31”-33”.

    Leave a comment:


  • Country Mile
    replied
    Really bold, gutsy and impressive tactical move and execution by Gidey in blowing the race open with 1500m to go. She didn't falter a bit. Very even pace from the time she put in her initial acceleration, all the way to the end. Just doesn't possess the kick Hassan does. Not only did she get the utmost out of herself but really made that race by throwing down the gauntlet in dramatic fashion. Kudos for that silver at 21 years of age. No fear.

    Leave a comment:


  • OneWay
    replied
    It's a fight between Hassan, SMU and Rojas. The IAAF has done SMU no favors by preventing her from doubling.

    Leave a comment:

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