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  • gh
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    In 1990 shot putter Augie Wolf took Wolfgang Schmidt to the San Francisco Opera to see "Siegfried." Apparently Wolfie had never heard operatic German before because a few bars into "Zwangvolle Plage...." he turned to Augie and said "Ich verstehe nicht!"

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  • RJMB_NSFB
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    We 'Southern Englanders'find these [northern English]accents only slightly less inpenetrable than you do,the hardest to fathom being some of the Scottish accents. Funnily enough though, I have been able to understand any American accent I have heard so far!

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  • malmo
    replied
    Oh my brothers, viddy this

    Nadsat Language Translator

    http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Academy ... adsat.html

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  • MJD
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    So, can anyone guess what my friend at the gym meant? (a few
    >posts north)

    I think Ben would kick it...

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  • marknhj
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    >"Australian or Strine?"

    Good lord man, I'm from London. Would never be accused of speaking strine!

    http://www4.tpg.com.au/users/bev2000/strine2.htm

    On one occasion I ordered a couple of pints of bitter in a rough pub in Gateshead for me and a javelin thrower. Was met by a sudden silence and more than one head turned in our direction. Drank the pigs ear in about 2 minutes and had it away on our toes asap!

    So, can anyone guess what my friend at the gym meant? (a few posts north)

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  • MJD
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    He even pronounced
    >Nottingham as "Notnum".

    These guys always say "how" instead of "what?".

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  • gh
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    Australian or Strine?

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  • marknhj
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    >"Just to
    >veer it slightly to running. When I first took up the sport in 82, two of the
    >guys in my group were from the isles. They were Scotsmen and had only been here
    >for 9 years so, naturally, their accent was still as thick as ever-true
    >Scotsmen never change their accent apparently."

    I shared a house in college with a guy from Nottingham, only about 100 miles or so north of London. I never understood a word he said for 4 years. He even pronounced Nottingham as "Notnum". Everyone here thinks I'm an Aussie, my theory is that English + Californian = Australian

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  • gh
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    Well, if we're going to go to important translation sites, they don't come much better than this! :-)

    http://sp24-7.lambtron.com/kennysays.htm

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  • MJD
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    >Love a duck, what a surprising direction this thread has gone to!

    Just to veer it slightly to running. When I first took up the sport in 82, two of the guys in my group were from the isles. They were Scotsmen and had only been here for 9 years so, naturally, their accent was still as thick as ever-true Scotsmen never change their accent apparently. For about 6 months, I'd run along and politely listen and nod appropriately as best as I could-not understanding a word they were saying. Now, of course, I can understand them completely and I can even serve as a translator for them which is kind of funny since we will all be speaking English when I am doing it.

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  • marknhj
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    Love a duck, what a surprising direction this thread has gone to! Here's the slang dictionary I refer people to:
    http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    If you want a decent site for English phrases like "cor blimey" that confuse you, try this:

    http://phrases.shu.ac.uk/

    (cor blimey, from "god blind me")

    Leave a comment:


  • marknhj
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    >>to be drunk in England is to be pissed. The rhyming slang for pissed is
    >"brahms & listz" which is then abreviated to "brahmsed"!<

    I suppose
    >Listz is how you spell Liszt when you're Brahmsed. :-)

    (Sorry, Mark.
    >Couldn't resiszt.)

    LOL! Bit early for that, 8.50am!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jefferson Buffalo
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    >to be drunk in England is to be pissed. The rhyming slang for pissed is "brahms & listz" which is then abreviated to "brahmsed"!<

    I suppose Listz is how you spell Liszt when you're Brahmsed. :-)

    (Sorry, Mark. Couldn't resiszt.)

    Leave a comment:


  • marknhj
    replied
    Re: For You Anagram Fans

    Believe it or not we do actually use rhyming slang a lot. When my Dad wanted my brother and me to go to bed when we were kids he'd say, "Go up the apples and pears, close your mince pies and go to bo peep." I was in a gym in London once and a friend asked me, "Is that sherman with a syrup an iron?" Work that one out!

    It can be more complicated as the slang is often an abbreviation of another slang word i.e. to be drunk in England is to be pissed. The rhyming slang for pissed is "brahms & listz" which is then abreviated to "brahmsed"!

    Leave a comment:

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