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  • Failing a "B" sample

    To those in the know, does the USA still protect the indenty of American athletes who fail "B" sample drug tests? I have noticed posts from from the past from this site identifying failed "B" s from other countries. If this is the case , are we close enough to the Olympics where the "due process" time frame could allow a failed test to be resolved after Athens. Sorry if this belongs in THG Ben , I thought it was a general question.

  • #2
    Re: Failing a

    Never mind due process. The IAAF rules require that USATF promptly notify the IAAF of any 'A' sample positive and regardless of how long the resolution process takes, I'm sure the IAAF will not allow anyone with a pending unresolved positive to compete in Athens. This is certainly true of anyone with a 'B' positive as well.

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    • #3
      Re: Failing a

      >The IAAF rules require that USATF promptly notify
      >the IAAF of any 'A' sample positive and >regardless of how long the resolution
      >process takes, I'm sure the IAAF will not allow >anyone with a pending
      >unresolved positive to compete in Athens.

      ...like it's never happened before...
      Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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      • #4
        Re: Failing a

        It may have happened before, but I can't recall a case where the IAAF knowingly allowed an athlete who had tested positive to compete unless he/she had already served his/her period of ineligibility or been exonerated.

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        • #5
          Re: Failing a

          >I can't recall a case where the IAAF knowingly
          >allowed an athlete who had tested positive to compete unless he/she had already
          >served his/her period of ineligibility or been exonerated.

          Me neither... but there have been plenty of examples when the IAAF just wasn't informed by the USATF what was going on. And even after last year's THG scandal, the IAAF had to publicly demand the documents regarding the cases long after the news of positive tests leaked out to the press.
          Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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          • #6
            Re: Failing a

            >>there have been plenty of examples when the IAAF just wasn't informed by the USATF what was going on. And even after last year's THG scandal, the IAAF had to publicly demand the documents regarding the cases long after the news of positive tests leaked out to the press.<<


            Let's just remember that for the past 3+ years, USATF has not done any testing at all. USADA is now responsible for testing in this country, and if the IAAF was looking for THG-related documents last year, I imagine they would have had to get them from USADA.

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            • #7
              Re: Failing a

              >>>there have been plenty of examples when the IAAF just wasn't informed by the
              >USATF what was going on. And even after last year's THG scandal, the IAAF had
              >to publicly demand the documents regarding the cases long after the news of
              >positive tests leaked out to the press.>>

              I believe this is flat-out wrong. In addition to what lawdude said about who is responsible for what, USADA vigorously prosecuted THG from the get-go and as soon as they had the chemistry equations in hand, called a major press conference to announce there were cases in the works.

              And when each person reached the proper stage of adjudication (a process which as I understand the IAAF has signed off on completely) a public announcement was made. I know nothing of the IAAF demanding any documents from anybody regarding THG cases. I could be wrong of course.

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              • #8
                Re: Failing a

                USATF does not get involved since the national anti-doping agency got involved .... it seems now that things are more fair and more efficient ... no chance for cases falling into 'black hole'

                I think that names do not become public until well after the 'B' sample

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                • #9
                  Re: Failing a

                  >>>>there have been plenty of examples when the IAAF just wasn't informed by
                  >the
                  >USATF what was going on. And even after last year's THG scandal, the IAAF
                  >had
                  >to publicly demand the documents regarding the cases long after the news
                  >of
                  >positive tests leaked out to the press.>>

                  I believe this is flat-out
                  >wrong. In addition to what lawdude said about who is responsible for what,
                  >USADA vigorously prosecuted THG from the get-go and as soon as they had the
                  >chemistry equations in hand, called a major press conference to announce there
                  >were cases in the works.

                  And when each person reached the proper stage of
                  >adjudication (a process which as I understand the IAAF has signed off on
                  >completely) a public announcement was made. I know nothing of the IAAF
                  >demanding any documents from anybody regarding THG cases. I could be wrong of
                  >course.

                  I can't find the URL now, but I did find a post quoting this story in the Board's archive (posted by James) a while after the story broke out in the media:

                  'I read an Associated Press story that said that the IAAF doesn't know who the four are because USATF hasn't told them yet! They're also pissed off about it.'

                  That was what I was referring to. Of course the names were released in the end, and I'm not necessarily claiming they wouldn't have been without the IAAF explicitly demanding them, but it did take take a while before the world governing body got them...
                  Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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                  • #10
                    Re: Failing a

                    Correct me if I am wrong , but M Jones past husband , Hunter, failed 3-4
                    doping tests prior to Sydney , yet the American "due process"
                    allowed him to compete. I thought that the stand made by Craig Masback was ,American law does not permit the release of names
                    of those who failed a A-B and have not gone through the arbitration process. When a legal view was posted that this law could not be found on the books, Masback re-stated , USATF by-laws do not permit this , which is entirely different. Could Regina Jacobs compete , as of now? please advise... everyone but the guy who keeps posting REGINA JACOBS THREADS IN CAPITAL LETTERS. Have a good weekend all.

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