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  • On the front page of the Sacramento Bee

    http://www.sacbee.com/content/sports/st ... 4556c.html

    Athletes' rights at issue
    Case against Jones lacks positive drug test, confession
    By Matthew Barrows and John Schumacher -- Bee Staff Writers
    Published 2:15 am PDT Wednesday, May 26, 2004

  • #2
    Re: On the front page of the Sacramento Bee

    These lawyers must really be frustrated. After having corrupted the sport through the legal system for year, they now find they have nowhere to turn this time.

    I hope some of these athletes have the bucks left to pay these valiant and valuable protectors of American rights.
    "Who's Kidding Who?"

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: On the front page of the Sacramento Bee

      The law professor's quote is worth something: people are convicted all the time on good circumstantial evidence. In other words, you don't always catch the killer in the act, or with blood on his fingers. From the article:

      "Peter Meyers, a George Washington University professor who teaches a course called "Drugs and the Law," said USADA's success ultimately boils down to the nature and amount of evidence the agency has received from the BALCO investigation. Meyers said he would be concerned if suspensions were based on fragmentary evidence. But he also said he could envision a scenario where there is enough information - e-mails, invoices, timetables for taking drugs - to build a solid case.

      "We convict people on that type of evidence every day of the week," Meyers said. "That type of evidence is the type that would allow people to go to jail in another context."

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      • #4
        Re: On the front page of the Sacramento Bee

        That explains why the United States has so many innocent people in its gulag system. The low-ball estimate is 10% or 200,000 people. I emphasize this is the low-ball figure. For blacks and hispanics, the figure is considerably higher. Even with death row, the figures are embarassingly high (if we had any sense of shame) for the amount of people proven to be innocent beyond a shadow of a doubt who were previously sentence to death. So this professor is, quite frankly, full of it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: On the front page of the Sacramento Bee

          >That explains why the United States has so many innocent people in its gulag
          >system. The low-ball estimate is 10% or 200,000 people. I emphasize this is
          >the low-ball figure. For blacks and hispanics, the figure is considerably
          >higher. Even with death row, the figures are embarassingly high (if we had any
          >sense of shame) for the amount of people proven to be innocent beyond a shadow
          >of a doubt who were previously sentence to death. So this professor is, quite
          >frankly, full of it.

          Without commenting on your rant with is really not relevant to the discussion at hand, the professor has it quite right actually.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: On the front page of the Sacramento Bee

            Runninghorse, if you think that 10% of people incarcerated are innocent, you need to find new sources of information.

            I'd be surprised if 1% was innocent, although any number above zero is bad. But with our legal system being the way it is, the guilty who walk for their crimes easily exceed the innocent taking the fall by a factor of over 50-1.

            Try that in a third-world backwater hellhole, where all you need to avoid justice is cash and/or connections, and all you have to do to end up behind bars is to have a different perspective from the prevailing norm. I'll take our way any day.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: On the front page of the Sacramento Bee

              >That explains why the United States has so many innocent people in its gulag
              >system. The low-ball estimate is 10% or 200,000 people. I emphasize this is
              >the low-ball figure. For blacks and hispanics, the figure is considerably
              >higher. Even with death row, the figures are embarassingly high (if we had any
              >sense of shame) for the amount of people proven to be innocent beyond a shadow
              >of a doubt who were previously sentence to death. So this professor is, quite
              >frankly, full of it.

              Are you arguing that since we're might be wrong in 10% of the cases, that we should set the other 90% free? No, the world is full of choices where we have to balance costs and benefits. 90 to 10 if a pretty overwhelming balance.

              Now, on the question of whether we should impose irrevocable sentences, i.e., the death penalty, in such a situation, I suspect we both agree that such a penalty is inappropriate given the risk of error.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: On the front page of the Sacramento Bee

                And it is also quite likely that those 10% did something to put themselves in a position to be charged and convicted in the first place. It is rare that someone completely innocent of any crime ever is framed and sentenced to jail. Most likely, they deserve to be there one way or another, which is good enough for me.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: On the front page of the Sacramento Bee

                  lets hope you never enter into a legal or judicial profession

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: On the front page of the Sacramento Bee

                    Memo to all the columnists and others who believe that a postive pee is the only way that you should be able to get these atheletes: Scott Peterson may be found guilty and get the death penalty primarily based on circumstantial evidence.

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