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A Millennial's view of doping

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  • A Millennial's view of doping

    Note: I'm not sure where this post belongs because it's not really about doping, but I don't think it belongs in dope talk.

    I was 109 days old when Ben Johnson blew the world away in Seoul. So in my lifetime, doping has always been a reality of sports, as there was not a time in my life where people were naive enough to think that the sport is super clean, even though it is well known that athletes have been cutting corners to improve their performance since the beginning of organized sports.

    As a result of being born into a world where doping was a reality, my attitude towards the act of doping and people who do it is one of near-total apathy. In my mind, athletes will just continue to evolve their techniques to try to gain even a minute advantage on their competitors while possibly risking their health in the process. The "fight" against doping, like the war on drugs has failed, and it is not a winnable battle. It is laughable to see how each new anti-doping technique is hailed as the game changer, when it's obvious that athletes will risk failing a test until there is a program in place where athletes are urine tested multiple times a day, and blood tested more than once a week. Of course everyone knows that this is logistically impossible unless all athletes who want to compete in global championships agree to live in some sort of commune for elite athletes, which is a ridiculous idea.

    It's time for a reassessment of priorities. Why are some drugs banned from sports? Health. If that's truly the case, then maybe athletes should only be allowed to train for 90 minutes a day, five days a week, as studies have shown that high exertion exercise poses serious health risks. Perhaps instead of using a biological passport to check whether an athlete is using drugs, it might be time to use something similar, along with regular physical examinations to make sure that athletes are healthy before allowing them to compete.

    There are worse offenses than taking a banned substance, and the binary oppositions drawn between dopers and non-dopers by fans and athletes are grating. In my view, the ill-fated crusade to rid sports of drugs, and the sanctimony from the power players on the rare occasions where an athlete tests positive are far more damaging to the image of the sport than a competition where athletes might decide to take drugs, but are competing in a regulated environment with an emphasis on the health of said athletes.

  • #2
    Re: A Millennial's view of doping

    Some good thoughts there, JumboElliott

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: A Millennial's view of doping

      Originally posted by JumboElliott
      my attitude towards the act of doping and people who do it is one of near-total apathy.
      The "fight" against doping, like the war on drugs has failed, and it is not a winnable battle.
      Why are some drugs banned from sports? Health. If that's truly the case, then maybe athletes should only be allowed to train for 90 minutes a day, five days a week, as studies have shown that high exertion exercise poses serious health risks.
      There are worse offenses than taking a banned substance
      the ill-fated crusade to rid sports of drugs, and the sanctimony from the power players on the rare occasions where an athlete tests positive are far more damaging to the image of the sport than a competition where athletes might decide to take drugs, but are competing in a regulated environment with an emphasis on the health of said athletes.
      All of these statements, in of of themselves, are understandable, but certainly not rationally supportable.
      All this 'milliennial' needs is some children who have talent and want to achieve a high level of success in sport. When he sees the advantage that the PEDers enjoy and then faces the reality of HIS kids having to juice up, will he realize what the real problem is. I would have no problem if every athlete (who wanted to) was under strict doctor's care in a PED regimen, but as we know, if athlete X takes this much, then I will DOUBLE . . . no, TRIPLE that, without a doctor's supervision, and now we've got real health risks and an uneven playing field again.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: A Millennial's view of doping

        Any parent who would put their minor child on a performance enhancing drug regimen is sick, just like those parents who try to get Tommy John surgery to increase their kid's fastball velocity.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: A Millennial's view of doping

          Originally posted by bambam
          Some good thoughts there, JumboElliott
          I agree.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: A Millennial's view of doping

            So do I.
            "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
            by Thomas Henry Huxley

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: A Millennial's view of doping

              Very slippery slope. I like Jumbo was born in the mid-late 80's and have grown up hearing about steroids, drugs etc. I really dont think people of my generation are all too concerned as I think most think there is some level of assisted enhancement in most pro athletes. The irony is track is way cleaner than all the major sports. First off(with exception of throwers) the majority of track athletes try to improve their speed/power ratio without major increases in size which may be detrimental to performance. Most NFL players goal in the offseason is to gain extreme amounts of muscle mass and improve strength. Think about the NFL combine, the bench press is one of the most important factors along with the 40 a good anabolic regimen could change an average performance to extraordinary. Frankly I believe 95 percent of linebackers, dlinemen, tight ends, running backs would fail a drug test by iaaf standards. When NFL players are busted its just a side note no one cares. Does anyone care about Brian Cushing(who has been juicing since HS BTW) and Shawne Merrimans positives of hardcore steroids? Nope just keep sacking people and we will cheer for you. Track and Field is making a mascot poppy show of themselves and then cant even figure out how to get some damn decent coverage then wondering why popularity is waining.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: A Millennial's view of doping

                I do have a problem with doping in the NFL and in boxing/MMA. I think increasing your physical performance/size/speed in a sport where it is your job to inflict physical punishment on another person is dangerous.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: A Millennial's view of doping

                  Originally posted by JumboElliott
                  I do have a problem with doping in the NFL and in boxing/MMA.
                  But you don't have a problem in T&F where either you're cheating someone out of prize money, or compelling them to take PEDs (and not to any 'safe' degree) to be competitive?

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                  • #10
                    Re: A Millennial's view of doping

                    When people in this sport start getting CTE and motor-neuron diseases in well above average rates, I'll change my position.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: A Millennial's view of doping

                      Originally posted by JumboElliott
                      I do have a problem with doping in the NFL and in boxing/MMA. I think increasing your physical performance/size/speed in a sport where it is your job to inflict physical punishment on another person is dangerous.

                      Which is probably why they all take steroids??

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: A Millennial's view of doping

                        While killing themselves and their fellow players in the process.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: A Millennial's view of doping

                          Originally posted by JumboElliott
                          When people in this sport start getting CTE and motor-neuron diseases in well above average rates, I'll change my position.
                          CTE in football = yes. But there is no evidence that motor-neuron disease (known in USA as ALS = Lou Gehrig's disease) is caused by trauma - unless I've missed it, and I don't think I have - we do see this problem in orthopaedics. But as a neurologist, Pego can certainly rhyme in on this more than I can.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: A Millennial's view of doping

                            Originally posted by bambam
                            Originally posted by JumboElliott
                            When people in this sport start getting CTE and motor-neuron diseases in well above average rates, I'll change my position.
                            CTE in football = yes. But there is no evidence that motor-neuron disease (known in USA as ALS = Lou Gehrig's disease) is caused by trauma - unless I've missed it, and I don't think I have - we do see this problem in orthopaedics. But as a neurologist, Pego can certainly rhyme in on this more than I can.
                            We have no cause of ALS. Different concepts have been proposed, genetic, infectious, environmental. None has so far been accepted. You see benign fasciculations, sometimes quite impressive in long distance runners that can look like ALS initially, but it is not associated with weakness, atrophy, does not progress and with rest, subsides.

                            I have seen those reports associating repeat head trauma with ALS, but doubt that this will be the case.
                            "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                            by Thomas Henry Huxley

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