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Witch Hunt Casualty

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  • Witch Hunt Casualty

    " The US swimming officials matched the track people for buffoonery. Rick DuMont, a 16-year-old Californian, won the 400-meter free-style only to be disqualified for failing a urine drug test after the race. He was penalized for taking the prescription drug Malax which was illegal because it contained an amphetamine. It turned out DuMont long had used the medicine because he suffered from asthma and listed the special medication on his pre-Olympic entry form. The American doctors, however, failed to clear the prescription with the International Olympic Comittee. And no American officials could be found who would admit that it was their fault in not alerting DuMont to stay off the drug during the Olympics. An international official said some American swimming official should be punished, but none were. DuMont's stunned mother said, "But he's been taking that medicine since he was a little boy."
    ------------------
    From a blog column by Stan Isaacs

  • #2
    Re: Witch Hunt Casualty

    Almost like what happened to Gatlin a few years ago
    why don't people pronounce vowels anymore

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Witch Hunt Casualty

      The DuMont thing was at the '72 or '76 Games, wasn't it? Witch hunting goes way back...and--funny thing--whenever someone goes looking for a witch, they always seem to find one.

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      • #4
        Re: Witch Hunt Casualty

        Rick DEmont.

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        • #5
          Re: Witch Hunt Casualty

          I don't get the connection. Since this isn't on the historical page, this appears to be a comment that the current situation is witch hunting. I didn't know that THG was a medicine that children took.

          Everyone knows this swimming case was silly. Taking a stimulant suddenly, as an adult, or worse, a disguised steroid, simply isn't the same.

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          • #6
            Re: Witch Hunt Casualty

            >I don't get the connection. Since this isn't on the historical page, this
            >appears to be a comment that the current situation is witch hunting. I didn't
            >know that THG was a medicine that children took.

            Everyone knows this
            >swimming case was silly. Taking a stimulant suddenly, as an adult, or worse, a
            >disguised steroid, simply isn't the same.

            ---------------

            Excuse me, but "everyone" apparently DOESN'T know that this swimming case was silly. The decision was never reversed by the viscious pitbulls of the sport. Furthermore, since when does it matter what "everyone" considers "silly." The only thing that matters are the "silly" conclusions of the powers-that-be of the sport.

            ... and what about more recently the case of Romanian gymnast Andreea Raducan who won the all-around gold medal. The 16-year-old was given cold medicine by her team doctor that, without her knowledge, contained a banned substance that, if anything, would have actually impeded her performance. That's also "silly" but the powers-that-be didn't think it was such. Now her life's hard work and effort were mercilessly and unjustly trashed and her good name besmirched forever. This innocent girl. What a pity. A lot of thanks she got from the world of sport for all that hard work, dedication and training without the use of drugs.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Witch Hunt Casualty

              So what was the point of your original post? Were you trying to compare obviously minor (or silly) cases to the current ones involving Montgomery, et al., and say that they too are victims of a witch hunt?

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              • #8
                Re: Witch Hunt Casualty

                Get a clue ... how can you even include an administrative mistake (DeMont case) to the clear attempts to dope by athletes

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                • #9
                  Re: Witch Hunt Casualty

                  >Get a clue ... how can you even include an administrative mistake (DeMont case)
                  >to the clear attempts to dope by athletes

                  -------
                  Obviously, you've answered your own inquiry and you tell ME to get a clue? Uhmmmkay.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Witch Hunt Casualty

                    Runninghorse, what exactly is your point?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Witch Hunt Casualty

                      >Runninghorse, what exactly is your point?

                      Based on Runninghorse's other posts elsewhere, I think the point is supposed to be that any prohibitions against performance-enhancing drugs should be lifted. Unfortunately, Runninghorse seemed to have missed entirely the long and lucid discussion held on this issue in a previous thread of "clean vs. dirty".

                      http://www.trackandfieldnews.com/tfn/di ... sage=55448

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Witch Hunt Casualty

                        The first casualty of any witchunt is often the truth.

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