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Fastest 100 meters ever

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  • #16
    Re: Fastest 100 meters ever

    Track is full of voodoo conversions and approximations, which should be taken with appropriate grains of salt, but somebody thinks they've come up with a formula for equating turn-running 100s to real 100s? C'mon!

    We've all seen little squatty guys who eat up the turns and on the other side of the coin the daddylonglegs characters who are fighting like mad to get a normal stride. To say there's one calculation that would accomodate these two opposing somatotypes is frivolous.

    That tight little stride MJ used obviously made him a great turn runner. (And somehow he figured out how to make it work for another 100 metres--wow!)

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    • #17
      Re: Fastest 100 meters ever

      First Bill Carr and now Bernie Wefers! Where will it end? I'm waiting for Lon Myers to chime in, and maybe Horry Lee or Billy Byrd Page.

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      • #18
        Re: Fastest 100 meters ever

        >First Bill Carr and now Bernie Wefers! Where
        >will it end? I'm waiting for Lon Myers to chime
        >in, and maybe Horry Lee or Billy Byrd Page.<

        Bunch of kids.

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        • #19
          Re: Fastest 100 meters ever

          I found it. The Fastest 100m Split Time from the Splits that I took from MJ's 19.32s in Atlanta OG 1996 was; 8.76s from 40-140m. His Fastest 10m Split that I took during that race was a 0.86s which he did no less than 4 or 5 times.
          He is thought to of had either a 0.84s or 0.85s Split according to other 'Analysists'.

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          • #20
            Re: Fastest 100 meters ever

            >Two reasons-

            1. altitude

            2. the Braves
            >pitching was consistently some of the worst in
            >baseball for the first 20+ years the stadium
            >existed.

            The stadium also had a lot of effects outside of altitude because the current stadium sits right across the street (the old Olympic stadium reconfigured). Of course reason #2 was a big reason, but the Braves players also hit a lot of homers. One year 3 players hit 40 or more homers (Johnson, Aaron and Evans). That was when 40 HR was a big number. Humidity might be a factor as well although being at about 1000 feet is a factor (BTW, I think the current stadium is now the third highest behind Coors (~5200 feet) and possibly the BOB in Phoenix (Phoenix and Atlanta are at about the same elevation).

            Braves fan since I was old enough to know what baseball was.

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            • #21
              Re: Fastest 100 meters ever

              Could be the "launching pad" has to do with density altitude. This is a phenomenon well known to pilots. Example: Lake Tahoe is 6200 feet. But on an 80 degree day, a plane's wings and prop will get no more lift out of South Lake Tahoe's airport than if the airport was at 9,000 feet on a 60-degree day.

              I vaguely recall the air temperature during MJ's WR was in the high 80s/low 90s. So the density altitude may have been around 4,000 feet.

              Now, whether density altitude affects runners as it does wings and props, I have no idea. Is there a physicist in the crowd?

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