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  • #16
    My paternal grandfather was running at about this time but it certainly doesn't look like him.

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    • #17
      Here's another possibility...the 1925 race also in Hereford on the race track...nice long video also.

      http://www.national.crosscountrycham...rtCC19253S.htm

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      • #18
        I wonder if it's even the final lap. He is a stride or two past the finish line, and seems to still carry himself as if he is still in a race. Maybe there is still a lap or two to go?

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        • #19
          More than likely a lap or more to go....also not the leader considering the indifference by everyone...

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
            More than likely a lap or more to go....also not the leader considering the indifference by everyone...
            Agree.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
              Now I suspect it is the English National @ 1920... they had 300+ runners and record number of spectators.
              I found this photo that shows 300+ number range purportedly from 1909 but the location doesn't seem to match the National for that year, which had snow. It indicates that there might have been a number of races with high numbers maybe due to number ranges for club/county/country etc rather than number of entrants.

              Stock Photo - Cross Country Championships, Doncaster in 1909 https://www.alamy.com/cross-country-...234770846.html

              Also looking at that "National" site you linked, all the runners seem to wear sleeved tops until singlets seemed to appear in the late '30s.

              I also note that the soldier's uniform seems very "relaxed" supporting a post-WWI timing which blew away most excess fripperies.

              One more odd thing. I agree that he is still running, supporting the idea that it's part way through the race. However, if the image was on a postcard, it was put on there to sell, so why would anybody think that people would buy a photo of a runner who wasn't any good and thus not famous enough to actually sell a postcard?

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              • #22
                Could be selling the race itself and not any individual.

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                • #23
                  Just got this email....

                  "However, if the image was on a postcard, it was put on there to sell, so why would anybody think that people would buy a photo of a runner who wasn't any good and thus not famous enough to actually sell a postcard?

                  If you want, you can quote a photo historian:

                  It was easy to make one-of-a-kind photo postcards in that period. Photo paper was sold in the postcard format, and amateurs made significant use of it to make personal, often one-of-a-kind, prints to send by mail. This image in question pretty obviously fits that category—it was not made for general sale.






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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
                    Just got this email....

                    "However, if the image was on a postcard, it was put on there to sell, so why would anybody think that people would buy a photo of a runner who wasn't any good and thus not famous enough to actually sell a postcard?

                    If you want, you can quote a photo historian:

                    It was easy to make one-of-a-kind photo postcards in that period. Photo paper was sold in the postcard format, and amateurs made significant use of it to make personal, often one-of-a-kind, prints to send by mail. This image in question pretty obviously fits that category—it was not made for general sale.





                    I can vouch that this particular photo historian knows what he is talking about.
                    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                    by Thomas Henry Huxley

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                    • #25
                      I've made one off postcards like that myself....Ilford still sells the photo paper.

                      https://www.amazon.com/Ilford-Multig.../dp/B00009R6DC

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                      • #26
                        Thanks Conrad for the references to the videos of the GB National XC championships. I watched almost every one and am very glad the Collegiate XC races didn’t have fences to jump over. In the videos I saw the same runner over and over being congratulated or congratulating the winner. His name is Ernie Harper who has an amazing XC record. He ran in 9 straight International XC races winning in 1926. He place 1st-4th in The National GB races from 1923-1930 (1st in 1929 and 2nd in four other years.)
                        He represented GB in 3 OG (1924-1928-1936 but not 1932. Does anyone know why he did not make the GB team that ran in Los Angeles. In 1936 he broke the OG marathon record but finished 2nd to a Japanese (actually a native Korean running under Japanese rule) by slightly over 2 min.
                        anyone have other information on Harper other than Wikipedia ?

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                        • #27
                          The videos are pretty cool and a pleasant find.

                          I've gone on country runs in England and had to climb fences like that.

                          I was hoping our hero would have shown up in one of them but no luck.....perhaps more videos will appear.

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