Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Berkeley 09 June 1979...

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Berkeley 09 June 1979...

    3000m

    1. Sydney Maree (Rsa) 7:43.04,
    2. Henry Rono (Ken) 7:47.4a
    3. John Treacy (Irl) 7:48.0a,
    4. Craig Virgin (Usa) 7:48.2a,
    5. Alberto Salazar (Usa) 7:53.2a.

    Does anyone has the full auto times for 2nd through 5th place?

  • #2
    Originally posted by AFTERBURNER View Post
    Does anyone has the full auto times for 2nd through 5th place?
    Isn't the real question, where did Maree's auto time come from?

    World Athletics carries it as 7:43.0h, as do contemporary reports.
    Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Master403 View Post

      Isn't the real question, where did Maree's auto time come from?

      World Athletics carries it as 7:43.0h, as do contemporary reports.
      Thanks for the clarification!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Master403 View Post

        Isn't the real question, where did Maree's auto time come from?

        World Athletics carries it as 7:43.0h, as do contemporary reports.
        "contemporary reports" were following IAAF rules of the time, under which distance races were reported only to the 10th. I don't know where the 100th came from, but it was surely taken.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by gh View Post

          "contemporary reports" were following IAAF rules of the time, under which distance races were reported only to the 10th. I don't know where the 100th came from, but it was surely taken.
          Didn't the rule change in 1977?
          Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Master403 View Post

            Didn't the rule change in 1977?
            No, actually auto times became mandatory for distances from 800m onwards only in 1981. QUITE STUPID!
            Should have been done in the 1960s if not earlier since the technology was available!

            Comment


            • #7
              Timing distances over 800 to .01 is useless accuracy...no track is measured to that precision...

              Comment


              • #8
                Reminds me of when swimming times got so precise they had to consider the thickness of the paint on pools.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The ATFS Annual for 1979 lists 3000 times in hundredths, but the Berkeley times are only in tenths.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
                    Timing distances over 800 to .01 is useless accuracy...no track is measured to that precision...
                    Exactly - kind of like that one centimeter difference between the three shot guys in Doha . . .



                    On another note, I lived in the area at the time but have no recollection of this race. Which track meet was this??

                    Last edited by bad hammy; 03-02-2020, 10:18 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It was the Brooks meet, if my memory serves me. The 7:43.0 was my viewing PR for over 40 years, till it got broken (enroute time) at last year's Pre 2 mile.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I worked automatic timing for a lot of races beginning shortly after that. (That meant reading a lot of Polaroids in bright sunlight.) Most or all of the automatic systems then had one chance at getting a flash or IR signal from the starting device. (That signal was generated by an acoustic pick-up near the starter's gun hand. When the starter moved to a new start line, we missed the start if they forgot to put the device back on their arm or forgot to turn the damn thing on.) If the start was missed, you reverted to hand times.

                        In modern systems, as I understand it, the starting device has a lot of electronics, and it and the finish line computer are linked. Time of day is synchronized. When a race starts, the start time is sent to the computer. If somehow the two disconnect, the starting device has maintained a cache of all the start times, allowing the appropriate one to be retrieved.

                        I wasn't surprised to see hand times for a 1979 3000 meter race. The failure to get the start was not uncommon then, but is almost impossible today.
                        Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by J Rorick View Post
                          It was the Brooks meet, if my memory serves me. The 7:43.0 was my viewing PR for over 40 years, till it got broken (enroute time) at last year's Pre 2 mile.
                          Thank you for that info. Sent me down a not-very-productive search for more info on that meet (actually a pair of meets, with one in Philly on June 30th). Online was mostly useless and my collection of T&FN is not easily accessible at this time. It would be great to have full results if anyone has them.

                          I did find a March 1979 T&FN highlighted by an indoor mile WR of 3.52.6 by Eamonn Coghlan. There was also news that at another meet Steve Scott ran a 4.00.6 mile on a 125m (136.6 yd) track. I thought the 160yd tracks I watched indoor meets on were small - 125m is tiny. What's the WR for the 1500/mile on a 125m track?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Forgot to mention that I came across this photo of the mile at the 1979 Brooks meet with Matt Centrowitz, John Walker and Dick Buerkle, and a high-tech scoreboard for the triple jump.

                            https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/n...oto/594760350?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by bad hammy View Post

                              Thank you for that info. Sent me down a not-very-productive search for more info on that meet (actually a pair of meets, with one in Philly on June 30th). Online was mostly useless and my collection of T&FN is not easily accessible at this time. It would be great to have full results if anyone has them.

                              I did find a March 1979 T&FN highlighted by an indoor mile WR of 3.52.6 by Eamonn Coghlan. There was also news that at another meet Steve Scott ran a 4.00.6 mile on a 125m (136.6 yd) track. I thought the 160yd tracks I watched indoor meets on were small - 125m is tiny. What's the WR for the 1500/mile on a 125m track?
                              We had a whole thread on miles on small tracks...

                              https://forum.trackandfieldnews.com/...ack-sub-4-mile

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X