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Explaining Track Needs Clarity

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  • Explaining Track Needs Clarity

    Happy birthday today (Tuesday) to two Olympic champions born a total of 187 years ago.

    One of these two people was born on a Tuesday and died on a Tuesday while the other athlete turns 75 today.

    Our birthday athletes competed in a total of four Olympic Games and won gold, silver, and bronze medals.

    You may already know that one of these two set a world record in winning that Olympic gold medal and the other individual never married.

    The older athlete was born on Gene Autry's first birthday and this older athlete was 37 when the younger athlete was born.

    Did you know that our older person was born on Greer Garson's fourth birthday?

    Don't know who Greer Garson is? Research that one.

    Relax, no hurdles were involved with these two champions at the Olympic Games.

    Interesting to note that one of our birthday athletes won two Olympic gold medals two days apart and won those gold medals approximately 862 miles (1,387 km) from the place where this champion was born.

    At the age of 57, this champion's kidneys failed and this person died the following year.

    Several Olympians have won a complete set of Olympic medals (gold, silver, & bronze) and one of our birthday athletes for today did that at three Olympic Games.

    It's time to name both Olympic champions on this final Tuesday of September.




  • #2
    I assume the older one is Eddie Tolan. Lemme think about NC.

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    • #3
      You assume correctly, tandfman. Eddie Tolan was born 112 yeas ago today in Denver, Colorado. Tolan won the 1932 Los Angeles Olympic 100 and 200 gold medals and he didn't even run on the four by 100 relay team. Eddie Tolan died in 1967 at the age of 58. You got the easy one, now who turns 75 today?

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      • #4
        NC is born 1945, so probably competed in 1968–1972–1976 or something like that. I don't remember anyone with those initials getting gold, silver, and bronze – so perhaps it's once again a relay runner.

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        • #5
          Now I cheated a bit and now know the answer. Actually I remember this athlete quite well, but there is a reason why "NC" did not bring him/her to my mind...

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          • #6
            Olli, you are very good and I believe I know why "N.C." did not "ring a bell" for you.

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            • #7
              If my guess is right, Olli thinks of this athlete as NT

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              • #8
                Your guess is correct, so I believe you might as well state it here.

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                • #9
                  I am not totally sure of her name actually. It's the shot putter Chichova (sp?), first name Nadezhda? I tend to get her and Chicherova mixed up.

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                  • #10
                    Happy 75th birthday today to Nadezhda Chizhova and nice going, noone. Chizhova won an Olympic bronze medal in the shot put in Mexico City (1968), even though she was injured there. Her gold medal came in Munich (1972) where she set a world record (21.03) on her first effort in the final. Margitta Gummel (East Germany) was way back in second place at 20.22. Gummel won the gold medal in Mexico City with a world record of 19.61, so it was sweet revenge for Chizhova in West Germany.

                    In Montreal (1976), Chizhova took the Olympic silver medal at 20.96 (Ivanka Khristova of Bulgaria won the gold at 21.16).

                    Quite a career for Nadezhda Chizhova of the Soviet Union. Good work, noone.

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                    • #11
                      As you seem to have guessed, the problem I had stemmed from the transliteration of the Russian character Ч. Where I am living, it is transliterated tsh or tš, but I should have remembered that in English it is ch. This seems not to be entirely consistent, however, as exemplified by Tchaikovsky for Чайко́вский.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Olli View Post
                        As you seem to have guessed, the problem I had stemmed from the transliteration of the Russian character Ч. Where I am living, it is transliterated tsh or tš, but I should have remembered that in English it is ch. This seems not to be entirely consistent, however, as exemplified by Tchaikovsky for Чайко́вский.
                        In our Olympic database we have a term we call the Tchaikovsky Rule. There is no known standard transliteration system by which the Russian Cyrillic for the composer should be transliterated as Tchaikovsky. So it refers to a name commonly known, which is technically incorrect. Anna Kournikova (tennis player) is somewhat the best modern example among athletes - in standard English transliteration it should be Anna Kurnikova, although Kournikova would be correct for a transliteration into French.

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                        • #13
                          and then there's the women's PV recordholder, who has a decent knowledge of English and on purpose personally uses a mixed transliteration, as in Yelena Isinbaeva

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                          • #14
                            Yelena, Jelena, Elena... At least these forms appear in Wikipedia in different languages, so three variants for Latinized initials for her.

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