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Brumel vs Sotomayor

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  • Diego Sahagún
    replied
    Re: Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    Gracias for the link bhall

    Leave a comment:


  • Per Andersen
    replied
    Re: Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    Also great running picture of Conway in Ed's "Flight School" book
    Cheers!

    Leave a comment:


  • The Fern
    replied
    Re: Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    I agree with HJ1 who I agree has to be Hollis. I was an official at the New York meet at Columbia in the early 90's and as I remember it was Hollis who scissored 2 meters, thus causing all the others to scissor it too. It was a great sight. That was when Patrik told me his best scissor was 2.15.

    Hollis sat and talked to my wife for a while that day and she has been a big fan ever since.

    Cheers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Per Andersen
    replied
    Re: Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    Yes, you were truly one of the great ones. It is a bit ironic that you, Stones and Sjoberg never won the Olympic Gold while Klyugin did.
    I am assuming you are Hollis Conway.

    Leave a comment:


  • hjumper1
    replied
    Re: Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    Hey I think you guys are right because all of these guys are exceptional. I do think that you did not take into account all of my stats. Two Olympic medals. #1 in the us seven consecutive years. ranked top 4 in the world six consecutive years. #1 in the world two years in a row. #3 on list of height over head. #4 all time height. Holds all collegiat records 15 years later. 10 USA championships (5 indoor and 5 outdoor). and many, many more.

    Leave a comment:


  • hj197steve
    replied
    Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    >>no fun to talk of negatives, but apparently Yashchenko was an alcoholic
    >and
    >died of liver disease as a result, or something like that.

    So 2 of
    >USSR's
    >greatest, Stepanov and Yashchenko, died young and tragically, and the
    >greatest
    >of them all, Brumel, died fairly prematurely as well.
    Yashchenko
    >must have started his downward spiral quickly because he never appeared the
    >following year after the 7' 8.50" world record jump indoors. I checked all my
    >Track and Field News for those years and he just seemed to disappear off the
    >radar screen. It would have been great to see him compete against Wessig and
    >Wzsola in Moscow in 1980. With his potential I could imagine an 8' clearance
    >with the straddle.

    John, he messed up his knee Big Time in 1979 I think, and was never the same afterwards. Do not really like to malign the departed, but apparently Yash was pretty heavy into the sauce even while competing, and after his career was over due to blasted out knee, it went downhill from there. HJMark could provide better info but that's up to him.

    Leave a comment:


  • john hunter
    replied
    Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    >no fun to talk of negatives, but apparently Yashchenko was an alcoholic and
    >died of liver disease as a result, or something like that.

    So 2 of USSR's
    >greatest, Stepanov and Yashchenko, died young and tragically, and the greatest
    >of them all, Brumel, died fairly prematurely as well.
    Yashchenko must have started his downward spiral quickly because he never appeared the following year after the 7' 8.50" world record jump indoors. I checked all my Track and Field News for those years and he just seemed to disappear off the radar screen. It would have been great to see him compete against Wessig and Wzsola in Moscow in 1980. With his potential I could imagine an 8' clearance with the straddle.

    Leave a comment:


  • john hunter
    replied
    Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    >I had an old TFN tape of high jumpers on it and it had straddlers on it and in
    >there was Brumel's record 2.28 off the cinders. It was so cool to actually see
    >the dirt kick up behind him as he left the ground.
    Was that the Tony Nett film? Back in the '60s I bought a sequence film from track and field news on Brumel. I also have that same sequence from an old British sports magazine. I believe the original article was called The Champion from Chita. Anyway, is that video available today?

    Leave a comment:


  • The Fern
    replied
    Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    I had an old TFN tape of high jumpers on it and it had straddlers on it and in there was Brumel's record 2.28 off the cinders. It was so cool to actually see the dirt kick up behind him as he left the ground.

    Leave a comment:


  • hj197steve
    replied
    Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    no fun to talk of negatives, but apparently Yashchenko was an alcoholic and died of liver disease as a result, or something like that.

    So 2 of USSR's greatest, Stepanov and Yashchenko, died young and tragically, and the greatest of them all, Brumel, died fairly prematurely as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • john hunter
    replied
    Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    >Brumel...off cinders, without modern technique, training, and "supplements".
    >However, I think Vladamir Yascheno was the greatest ever talent.

    I was shocked to hear Yaschenko was dead. Do you have any more information on him?

    Leave a comment:


  • john hunter
    replied
    Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    Thanks for the lead. I just had the impression that Olympic videos would be brief in the time spent especially the jumps. Have you seen any other Olympics on tape or DVD eg.Rome 1960?

    I remember Brumel's world record jump on ABC wide world of sports in 1963 but couldn't contact them about a tape.

    Anyway thanks again!

    John

    Leave a comment:


  • The Fern
    replied
    Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    It is the youngsters who do it instinctively and it happens before they learn to drive their arms in coordination with their knee. Three things I use with them.

    1. I have them stand with locked knees and toes up off the ground and learn to drive their arms to lift themselves off the ground with no help from the legs.
    2. I keep telling them that they have three limbs that can go up and only one to go down, so they have to coordinate the three to go up at the same time.
    3. They must scissor till the bar is between their chin and their ears.

    I also do some work off springboards which helps them realize they can go higher if they drive their arms up.

    Very few of the kids I have taught have led with their arm.

    Personally I learned by copying Chris Dunn who jumped for Colgate and was on the '72 team. He used to drive both arms and then slap his hands to the top of his thighs as he went over the bar. I did this during my senior year in high school and then left it as I had it sorted out by then.

    Leave a comment:


  • Per Andersen
    replied
    Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    Good advice, Ed You have no idea how many coaches I see walking around at High School meets
    lifting their right knee and throwing up their arm demonstrating the take-off to their jumpers.
    We discussed the inside arm on this site before as it seems clear that several of the leading jumpers like Holm, Strand and to a lesser degree Freitag already has lifted the inside arm going into the take-off. I know Strand believes that it helps him with a quicker take-off. However, it goes against the idea of lifting the arms together with the knee. A couple of years ago I thought that only young, inexperienced jumpers did this but it is quite common it seems. Any thoughts on this?

    Leave a comment:


  • The Fern
    replied
    Re: Brumel vs Sotomayor

    I used the arm at the sides too, except my right arm sort of extended as I got to the bar but never really led over the bar.

    I can only see lead arms working when the bar gets over your head. On youngsters I work very hard on not leading the arm. It's a safety thing that they do unconsciously, and it cuts off their upward movement. I teach them to drive both arms to their shoulder height (blocking) and then catch up to them in the air.

    On Stefan Holm's web site there is some video of him jumping and he leads the arm but as it is so high it doesn't cut off the height he is going to get.

    Cheers

    Leave a comment:

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