Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Weakest Olympic Gold medal performance

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Weakest Olympic Gold medal performance

    While I’m not crazy about the subject text, I’m curious about the weakest men’s gold medal performance. Obviously the winner tap danced away with a gold medal. I’m looking for the winning performance that left all of other competitors kicking the lockers wondering how they allowed themselves to be beaten by “that performance”. Perhaps that it is the M1500 from Rio, perhaps there are others.

  • #2
    The Rio men's 1,500 is a good start. The winner won with a pretty slow time (slowest Olympic winning time since Luigi Beccalli ran 3:51.20 to win in Los Angeles (1932). Time doesn't matter, you're still the Olympic champion.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by DoubleRBar View Post
      The Rio men's 1,500 is a good start. The winner won with a pretty slow time (slowest Olympic winning time since Luigi Beccalli ran 3:51.20 to win in Los Angeles (1932). Time doesn't matter, you're still the Olympic champion.
      Of course. These guys have the gold medals. I’m pretty sure everyone else on the track that day sat at the bar that night wondering “how the [email protected]#$ did I let that happen?” I’m pretty sure none of the other competitors that day walked away feeling like they did their best. Those are the events I’m looking for.

      Comment


      • #4
        Centrowitz ran a great race in Rio and he also had a very lucky day. Lucky because everyone in the race let him set the pace.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by DoubleRBar View Post
          The Rio men's 1,500 is a good start. The winner won with a pretty slow time (slowest Olympic winning time since Luigi Beccalli ran 3:51.20 to win in Los Angeles (1932). Time doesn't matter, you're still the Olympic champion.
          sorry, but other than the El G/Lagat classic in Athens, this is probably my favorite among the dozen Olympic finals I've seen in person.

          A consummate display of savvy racing skills by Centro. Time is irrelevant when the object is to cross the line first.

          I'm also amazed at all the dumping on Centro, as if he were somehow put in charge of the pace of the race. How can you fault him for best understanding what was going on?

          Comment


          • #6
            Wyndham Halswelle comes to mind. British 400m Gold in 1908.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by gh View Post
              A consummate display of savvy racing skills by Centro. Time is irrelevant when the object is to cross the line first.
              Just watched it for the first time in a while - Centro owned that race from beginning to end: lock, stock & barrel. It was a masterful performance . . .

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Grf_62s_95w

              Comment


              • #8
                Too many looking for numbers to put in a book. It was a great race.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bad hammy View Post

                  Just watched it for the first time in a while - Centro owned that race from beginning to end: lock, stock & barrel. It was a masterful performance . . .

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Grf_62s_95w
                  If Centro had just mucked around in the pack, afraid to do anything, and got lucky in a mad dash for the finish, it might have been a forgettable race. But, as Bad Hammy said, Centro controlled the race from the front, and had the mind and move to keep control / the lead when challenged going into the last lap. And he held off the Olympic 800m silver medalist at the finish.

                  To me, the 1992 men's 1500m was far less memorable than Rio 2016. Wasn't it the Barcelona 1500 that somebody commented on by saying, "Eleven stupid men"?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gh View Post
                    A consummate display of savvy racing skills by Centro. Time is irrelevant when the object is to cross the line first.

                    I'm also amazed at all the dumping on Centro, as if he were somehow put in charge of the pace of the race. How can you fault him for best understanding what was going on?
                    Told ya.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      With field events, tactical competion doesn't come into question, so perhaps this thread is more relevant for those events. At least Keshorn Walcott's 84m throw in London 2012 struck as a performance that probably created reactions of the kind that Dave described in his opening post.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I agree that tactically, Centro was great in Rio!
                        But the Olympics are supposed to be the ultimate, the best in ALL facets of the event!
                        Tactics is just one facet of racing!
                        You can have great perfect tactics AND super fast times in the same race, as demonstrated in the 1974 Commonwealth Games Men's 1500!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My guess is that before WWI or perhaps even WWII, it is quite difficult to assess levels of performance relative to the standards at that time. While you may see that a certain winning performance was well outside the then World Record, you may not be aware, for example, that the WR was an outlier or that the conditions for the Olympic event were particularly difficult (difficult winds, too hot, too cold, poor running/jumping throwing surface etc.).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I always think of Patoulidou's 92 100mh win as weak, but maybe it's more shock than weak. But still, there has only been one Olympic gold won in a slower time since - Shishigina in 2000, which itself could be a candidate too.
                            Patoulidou's win was of course partly due to Dever's fall, but also because Donkova's comeback wasn't quite vintage Donkova. Similarly in 2000, Shishigina benefited from Dever's DNF in the SFs.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by gh View Post

                              sorry, but other than the El G/Lagat classic in Athens, this is probably my favorite among the dozen Olympic finals I've seen in person.

                              A consummate display of savvy racing skills by Centro. Time is irrelevant when the object is to cross the line first.

                              I'm also amazed at all the dumping on Centro, as if he were somehow put in charge of the pace of the race. How can you fault him for best understanding what was going on?
                              Well said from a "field event" person. There are some running events that require mental tactics and some that require only all out physical performance (100 m, 200m and probably 400m). When you go to *800, 1500, and longer from the starting line to the finishing line there are many, many ways to "win the race" and cross the finish line first and receive your gold medal..
                              Field event athletes never "compete" physically against each other on the run-way or "circle" but alone. Some pass a trial to win the gold on fewer misses. Some long jumpers step on a line, fall outside the circle and become dq (like a false start in running). I believe Bannister commented on the mile run being both mental and physical throughout the four laps and the pace may very and you need to adjust your own strategy (for place not time). Centro would have adjusted if someone took over the pace at the 200m mark, I am sure.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X