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WR Holder Loses Competition & Record to new WR Setter Sequence

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  • WR Holder Loses Competition & Record to new WR Setter Sequence

    While looking at the "Progression of World Athletic Records" book's entries for Paola Pigni, I noticed an interesting circumstance:

    In setting her 1500m WR of 4:12.4 in 1969, Pigni defeated the exiting record holder, Maria Gommers (4:15.6 in 1967), who actually bettered her own record in finishing 2nd in 4:15.0.
    Then Pigni beat her own record when running 4:12.0 while being defeated by Jaroslava Jehlickova's 4:10.7 (at the European Championships, later in 1969).
    Jehlickova herself was in the race when her own record fell, when Karin Burneleit ran 4:09.6 to win the European Championships in 1971 (Jehlickova 7th in 4:14.8).

    I wonder if there is a longer sequence (3 here) of the existing WR holder losing his/her record while in that race /competition. (I wish I could think of a less awkward title for this.)

  • #2
    Alan, we'll call it a Sigmon Sequence after you since I've never even heard this described before

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    • #3
      A real display of bambam-esque knowledge there Alan.

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      • #4
        I seemed to remember another instance of this, and I thought that was a field event. I have found that second example, though it's slightly different from the women's 1500m.

        Men’s Hammer Throw:
        May 16, 1980, Leselidze – On his 3rd throw, Yuriy Syedikh breaks Karl-Hans Riehm’s WR of 80.32 with 80.38. Later in the 3rd round, Juri Tamm becomes the WR holder, breaking Syedikh’s minutes-old mark with 80.46. But in the 5th round, Syedikh break’s Tamm’s record with 80.64. Thus, WR holder Tamm loses the competition to new WR holder Syedikh. [However, Tamm wasn’t the WR holder when the competition began, as in the women’s 1500m example.] (#1)

        Eight days later, May 24, at Sochi, Syedikh throws 79.98 to finish 3rd, with Sergey Litvinov breaking Syedikh’s WR with a toss of 81.66. (#2)

        July 31, 1980, Moscow Olympic Games – Syedikh wins gold with a WR throw of 81.80. Former WR holder Litvinov is 2nd at 80.64. (#3)


        So another sequence of 3 consecutive WR’s in which the existing WR holder lost the competition to the new WR holder.

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        • #5
          Another variant on this was the final WR in the Women's Pentathlon at the 1980 Moscow Games where Ola Kuragina broke her WR of 4856 with 4875 having run 2:03.8 in the 800m. However, this lasted 1.2 seconds as Olga Rukavishnikova finished in 2:04.8 to score 4937, meaning Kuragina held the WR for all of 1.0 seconds. This became the briefest WR ever when Nadezhda Tkachenko ran 2:05.2 to set the closing WR of 5037, with Rukavishnikova holding the record for 0.4 seconds. Only Tkachenko's mark was ratified

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          • #6
            How about the 1968 Olympic triple jump final. You had to break the world record just to get in the lead. Without checking was it Gentile to Saneyev to Prudencio and back to Saneyev in round 6?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by George Matthews View Post
              How about the 1968 Olympic triple jump final. You had to break the world record just to get in the lead. Without checking was it Gentile to Saneyev to Prudencio and back to Saneyev in round 6?
              True, but that would only be 2 instances of a/the WR holder losing the competition (Gentile, Prudencio). I was looking for a sequence of 3+ consecutive WR's in which it happened. And, in this case, the 2 aren't consecutive since the first Saneyev WR was sandiwiched between them.

              But the Mexico City triple jump is probably unique in the WR setting department with 4 WRs by 3 different athletes during the competition.

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