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  • Francis Hussey

    So did this high school kid actually blow the doors off Harold Abrahams in that 24 Olympic 4x1 or just a story. Have read he was on the third leg not lead off,, so???

    And anyone have the actual Peacock vs Owens score, I have 7-3 in favor of Peacock, talking 100.

    The Frank Lombardi story is hard to buy, but apparently true. Strange how after 1915 we never hear of Lombardi again, while Frank Wykoff (came in second) had a long career, first legal 9.4.

    What would an All Time 100m look like for sprinters who never ran in an Olympics, obviously Peacock gets a lane.

    lane

    1.Eddie Hart.................I know, but what the heck
    2.Steve Williams
    3.Eulace Peacock
    4.Stanley Floyd
    5.Houston McTear
    6.Hal Davis
    7.James Sanford
    8.Jim Golliday
    Last edited by Alcyallen; 07-21-2021, 12:25 AM.

  • #2
    Hussey and Abrahams were the first legs and Abrahams led at the exchange....read the free Olympics download...

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
      Hussey and Abrahams were the first legs and Abrahams led at the exchange....read the free Olympics download...

      So this is bogus?


      Frank Hussey

      From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      Jump to navigationJump to search

      Hussey at the 1924 Olympics
      February 14, 1905
      New York City, U.S.
      December 26, 1974 (aged 69)
      Coxsackie, New York, U.S.
      178 cm (5 ft 10 in)
      70 kg (154 lb)
      Athletics
      100 m, 100 yd
      Stuyvesant High School
      100 m – 10.7 (1924)
      100 yd – 9.6 (1928)[1][2]
      Francis Valentine Joseph "Frank" Hussey (February 14, 1905 – December 26, 1974) was an American sprint runner who won a gold medal in the 4 × 100 m relay at the 1924 Summer Olympics.

      Frank Hussey, a schoolboy sensation from New York City's Stuyvesant High School,[3] ran the third leg in the American 4 × 100 m relay team in Paris Olympics, which won the gold medal in a new world record of 41.0.[2]

      After returning from Paris, he entered Boston College, and as a freshman became the leading Collegiate runner in America. He won the AAU championships in 100 yd (91 m) in 1925.[1][2]

      Although he was considered as a main favorite to gold medal in 100 m before the 1928 Summer Olympics, Hussey was eliminated in the heats of US Olympic Trials. After that he worked as a salesman, taught in the New York State Prison System, and served as an official at athletics events in his free time.[1]

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      I have read (which gave me the idea) a couple places where like you said he was on that first leg but gave the USA lead.
      Last edited by Alcyallen; 07-21-2021, 12:02 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        If you wiki any of this there is Hussey on that third leg, so... ? And I have read he gave the USA a lead they never lost.

        Just found where he was on second leg in the heats but first in the final.

        In Who is Who in Track, they talk about how this high school kid handled the Olympic champ on that first leg of the 4x1, ah......to everyones surprise, which it would be.

        Speaking of the 4x1 relay, kinda strange what we pulled in 1932 running a team with none of our 100m sprinters on the team, didn't matter still won the gold.

        Last edited by Alcyallen; 07-21-2021, 12:17 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Right...Wikipedia...always right.

          The Tokyo Olympic book...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
            Right...Wikipedia...always right.

            The Tokyo Olympic book...


            Like I mentioned read how Hussey handled Abrahams in Who is Who in Track & Field, see if I can it find it.

            Why would I think that if I didn't read it somewhere?. Ya know.....high school kid vs ........
            Last edited by Alcyallen; 07-21-2021, 12:56 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              I can't find what I thought I read, did find a,,,,,Hussey surprised by keeping it close.

              So, you da man!

              Comment


              • #8
                bambam and rhymans can probably best explain the order discrepancies in the heats and semis, but I noticed that for those two rounds Wiki lists relay participants in alphabetical order.

                Bam's data at Olympedia corrects the order for USA and GBR for those rounds, most likely because of the research done in connection with the Progression of the World Record (which was equaled or broken five times over the three rounds).

                Even at Olympedia all participants for relay teams other than USA and GBR in all rounds are listed in alphabetical order. I doubt this is a cosmic coincidence, and the true order for every team has probably never been published. For the final, however, we can be assured that the order for USA and GBR at least are correct in the official report.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Alcyallen View Post
                  So did this high school kid actually blow the doors off Harold Abrahams in that 24 Olympic 4x1 or just a story. Have read he was on the third leg not lead off,, so???

                  And anyone have the actual Peacock vs Owens score, I have 7-3 in favor of Peacock, talking 100.

                  The Frank Lombardi story is hard to buy, but apparently true. Strange how after 1915 we never hear of Lombardi again, while Frank Wykoff (came in second) had a long career, first legal 9.4.

                  What would an All Time 100m look like for sprinters who never ran in an Olympics, obviously Peacock gets a lane.

                  lane

                  1.Eddie Hart.................I know, but what the heck
                  2.Steve Williams
                  3.Eulace Peacock
                  4.Stanley Floyd
                  5.Houston McTear
                  6.Hal Davis
                  7.James Sanford
                  8.Jim Golliday
                  Maybe Paul Nash

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    According to the report, it seems the WR at the start of the meet was topped at least 8 times. Is that even more than the Mexico City TJ?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by KDFINE View Post

                      Maybe Paul Nash

                      Out goes Eddie Hart enter....Paul Nash

                      Good one!

                      There was a Cuban named Conrado Rodriquez who was this and that just not allowed to leave the island. Talk of a match race vs Jesse Owens in Cuba, never happened.
                      Last edited by Alcyallen; 07-21-2021, 04:52 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hart did run the 100 heats in 1972...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
                          Hart did run the 100 heats in 1972...


                          See where I say,,,,,,I know but what the heck. What happened to him and Robinson, ouch!

                          Do doubt he beats Borzov but probably takes the silver.

                          Did see Taylor take Borzov down on a 4x1 anchor in 72. Started out even. Hart on third leg.
                          Last edited by Alcyallen; 07-21-2021, 04:15 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The idea that Frank Hussey had two-yard lead on Abrahams comes from the Associated Press writer (not bylined and unknown to me), whose report was carried in most U.S, papers, including the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times. Here is the paragraph describing the race:

                            "Francis Hussey, the Stuyvesant High School boy, No. 1 on the American team, picked up two yards on Harold Abrahams, Great Britain, in the first 100 meters, showing wonderful turn of speed and outfooting the English winner of the individual 100 meters. Louis Clark (sic), No. 2, more than held his own with Rangeley and Loren Murchison did likewise with his opponent. The Americans' fourth man, Alfred Leconey, had from seven to eight feet lead when he started against Nichol He increased this a little, and then fell bak, winning by a yard and a half.'

                            The race was run on a 500m track with the first leg run entirely on the backstretch extended straightaway. The U.S. was in lane 1, with Britain in 4.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Alcyallen View Post

                              Did see Taylor take Borzov down on a 4x1 anchor in 72. Started out even. Hart on third leg.
                              Taylor on the backstretch, Hart on the anchor. (Or did they meet somewhere other than the OG?)

                              I still have Jim McKay's call seared into my memory - "Eddie Hart, trying to outrun Borzov, trying to outrun the World's Fastest Human, and he's done it! The United States has won! . . . . . Look at this fella, look at Eddie Hart, from California. It looked like he just wouldn't get a chance to run against Borzov, but he did. And he beat him! "

                              (Actually I think I can still recall the entire race call, McKay and Bill Toomey.)

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