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To Catch A Cheat

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  • To Catch A Cheat

    Happy birthday today (Friday) to an Olympic champion who was born on a Friday 67 years ago today and won the Olympic gold medal on a Friday in Europe.

    This athlete did not compete in the Olympic hurdles.

    Thank you to an "old" friend of mine (who is no longer with us) for the use of our title.

    The title of this thread does not imply that our birthday champion was a cheater.

    Our birthday athlete has a connection with Stanford University.

    Eight years ago, this individual became a member of a certain city council.

    Can you name our birthday gold medalist on this first Friday of September?

    Please go ahead and submit your answer.


  • #2
    Born in -54 and won in Europe? That must have been either Munich -72 or more probably Moscow -80. Many western countries boycotted the latter, so who might have been in Stanford (or is it just a connection?)? Frankly speaking, I have no idea, but I'll make a guess anyhow based on nothing: Alan Wells.

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    • #3
      Not a bad guess, Olli, however Alan Wells is a couple of years older than our birthday athlete and Wells won an Olympic silver medal (200) in Moscow. Our birthday athlete did win Olympic gold in Moscow, but competed in only one event.

      I don't believe there was much talk of cheating in the men's 100 in Moscow.

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      • #4
        OK, if the title refers to cheating in Moscow, that might concern triple jump (with very questionable "fouls" of Campbell and de Oliveira), discus (with questionable measuring of Luis Delis's throw) or javelin (with questionable opening of stadium gates to get winds for the Soviet, and with questionable measuring of Kula's throw, which did not seem to land point first). If it's one of those three, I'll make an almost random guess: Jaak Uudmäe.

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        • #5
          Happy birthday (67) today to Jaak Uudmae. Your random guess is a very good guess. Nice work, Olli.

          Jaak Uudmae won the 1980 Olympic triple jump in July of 1980. I was not in Moscow (couldn't get a visa) for those Games, however I have talked with several friends (very reliable track friends) who did witness the men's triple jump in Moscow. Olli sounds like he knows what he is talking about while using facts and not opinions.

          Here are some facts. Viktor Saneyev (Soviet Union) took the silver medal in the Moscow triple jump. Joao Carlos de Oliveira (Brazil) got the bronze medal. Keith Connor (Great Britain) was fourth place in Moscow and Ian Campbell (Australia) was fifth place. Atanas Chochev (Bulgaria) was sixth place. Bela Bakosi (Hungary) was seventh and Ken Lorraway (Australia) was eighth.

          We don't know for sure that there was some cheating during the Moscow triple jump. A lot of the people I have talked with who were in the stadium for the triple jump believe there was some cheating. That is opinion. So, there might be a pretty good chance that there was some cheating during this event.

          If you take Ian Campbell and Joao Carlos de Oliveira (as mentioned by Olli) and look at their total of 12 jumps in the Moscow triple jump final, you can find that there were nine of those 12 jumps that were ruled as "fouls". Three of my friends that were sitting very close to the triple jump board have questioned all nine of those "fouls".

          I won't go into the other Olympic events (like the discus and the javelin) right now, but several of you already know the facts.

          Jaak Uudmae was declared the triple jump winner and he remains as the Olympic champion.

          Thank you, Olli.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by DoubleRBar View Post
            ......

            We don't know for sure that there was some cheating during the Moscow triple jump. .....
            Viktor Saneyev, for one, would disagree with you. I had beers with him in Sydney in '96 (yes,, '96) and he said he had made enemies in the federation and they conspired to deny him the gold.

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            • #7
              By contrast, I remember that a Finnish right-wing newspaper (or periodical) speculated that the Soviets expressly wanted Saneyev to win his fourth gold, and the Estonian Uudmäe's win was a kind of an accident.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by DoubleRBar View Post
                Not a bad guess, Olli, however Alan Wells is a couple of years older than our birthday athlete and Wells won an Olympic silver medal (200) in Moscow. Our birthday athlete did win Olympic gold in Moscow, but competed in only one event.

                I don't believe there was much talk of cheating in the men's 100 in Moscow.
                Didn't Wells win the gold in the 100 in Moscow ?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ianb View Post

                  Didn't Wells win the gold in the 100 in Moscow ?
                  Yes, but DoubleRBar usually mentions other Olympic medals won in his clues. If Wells had been the answer, he would have said that he also won silver.

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