Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Jim Ryun's Munich fall

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by JMysterio View Post
    More Jim "Big Deal" Ryun love. He had about 3 dominant years and would only run on US soil except for the Olympics. No matter how much he denies it Mexico was a disappointment. Keino traumatized him and he was very beatable after that. He even quit. Then he made the mistake of running in the pro track fiasco.

    Pre, Shorter, Rodgers and even though I hate to say it...Salazar did more for US distance running when they competed.
    Respectfully disagree - and I would not say I was the biggest Ryun fan. He was totally unbeatable in 66/67. Most of his races were in the USA, but he had great runs in 1967 in London and Dusseldorf, against his biggest opponents. Those who followed track in those days, were really impressed by him. Of course, 68 and 72 were different years; it is a pity he never fully lived up to his potential/reputation after 1967.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by player View Post

      Not so:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0ICn7-Uaqk

      Notice Keino stalking off after the finish. Didn't like to lose.

      Stalking off or not, it let him know that he could never beat Ryun with a fast pace over part of the last lap. Hence dictated his Mexico City tactics. I believe his earlier OG losses in 68, particularly that to Gammoudi, drove him harder in the 1500. In 1972 by contrast, he was satisfied/pleased, with his victory over Jipcho, and didn't seem to go all out in the 1500; was a sitting duck for Vasala.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Steele View Post
        For me, Shorter was behind Pre and way behind Ryun in terms of influence and motivation. He was the best marathoner of his era, hands down, but quite human at any distance under that, and didn't stand a chance if a race came down to anyone with a kick. Ryun, OTH, obliterated everyone in his prime. Fast race, slow race, he just walked away from them. Shorter won races, Ryun made the hair on your arms stand up.
        The opposite for me. Ryun was the guy who made me initially pay attention to the sport. His career was virtually over by the time I was "all in". Shorter was a much bigger influence for me and, I think, on the sport as a whole. Pre was a non factor for me.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Tuariki View Post
          Fiasco?? From a biased point of view, I don't think so. It was a lot of fun, and for the most part, the ITA had good crowds.
          Yep, I ran an invitational Masters 100m in a couple of those ITA meets. Thane Baker was faster than I in 1952 and confirmed it in 1972,

          Comment


          • #35
            Got this book for Xmas in 1970, age 8, and the pages on Ryun were what sparked my first interest in running and T&F. I seem to recall a description of his HS interval training and how he'd get home from practice after dark and his stomach would still be so upset he couldn't eat dinner. Seemed like a logical thing to do, so I went out for the team in 1975. :-)

            Comment


            • #36
              On cover, I think: Palmer, Abdul Jabbar, Gibson, Orr, Namath.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by noone View Post
                On cover, I think: Palmer, Abdul Jabbar, Gibson, Orr, Namath.
                Yes!

                Comment


                • #38
                  I had that same book, and although I am quite the pack-rat, I do not think I still have it.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    In some ways, Shorter had a bigger influence on the sport, but on the road running and marathon side. Ryun was running when, as best I can tell from looking at Louisville Courier Journal archives online, track and field actually got decent attention in the sports pages. I suspect your casual sports fan in 1968 knew more about Ryun than your casual fan in 1976 knew about Shorter.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      I suspect your casual sports fan in 1968 knew more about Ryun than your casual fan in 1976 knew about Shorter.

                      For sure...

                      The World Book encyclopedia 1968 Year Book had a long article on Ryun with lots of color pictures.
                      Last edited by Conor Dary; 11-08-2021, 09:45 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by DrJay View Post
                        Got this book for Xmas in 1970, age 8, and the pages on Ryun were what sparked my first interest in running and T&F. I seem to recall a description of his HS interval training and how he'd get home from practice after dark and his stomach would still be so upset he couldn't eat dinner. Seemed like a logical thing to do, so I went out for the team in 1975. :-)

                        Ha, at four years older than you my edition was from 1966 - pre-Ryun. The track/field folks included Glenn Cunningham, Rafer Johnson, Bob Mathias, Randy Matson, Jesse Owens & Jim Thorpe. Cover has Sandy Koufax (the only Dodger this Giants fan ever cared about), Arnold Palmer, Don Schollander, Johnny Unitas, Wilt Chamberlain & Bill Russell.


                        cover.jpg
                        contents - i.jpg
                        contents - ii.jpg
                        Last edited by bad hammy; 11-09-2021, 02:06 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
                          I suspect your casual sports fan in 1968 knew more about Ryun than your casual fan in 1976 knew about Shorter.

                          For sure...

                          The World Book encyclopedia 1968 Year Book had a long article on Ryun with lots of color pictures.
                          If that was the story written by Hal Higdon with photos by Rich Clarkson, it was an excellent article. Another mainstream publication, The New York Times magazine, had a long cover story on Shorter in early 1973.
                          Last edited by Chicago; 11-09-2021, 01:13 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Django View Post
                            I had forgotten that he had run such poor times ( for him) as 4:19 in March of 1972, and its very interesting to learn that, just days earlier, he had done incredible workouts at UCSB. In retrospect, I wonder if he was “training through” some of those early races, planning to peak at the OGs? At that point, I think he was self-coached, and coaches of the era such as Bowerman might have advised him about the benefits of rest in a training program.
                            He’s now a friend of a friend, and I might possibly be able to ask through my friend about what was happening that resulted in those huge fluctuations in performances.
                            I got in touch with my friend, who was a close personal friend of Ryun’s, and learned that they had never discussed Ryun’s inconsistent performances during 1972, and my friend attributed it to “ mental problems”.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X