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Really obscure question (I don’t know the answer)

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  • Really obscure question (I don’t know the answer)

    Can anybody tell me why Felix Rinner was dq’ed in the 1932 400? The guy has quite the bio.

  • #2
    his Olympedia entry makes no mention of any DQ

    https://www.olympedia.org/athletes/64946

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    • #3
      I can't find anything about his DQ in 1932. He did run the 400 and won his opening heat in 49.2. He was second (48.9) in his quarterfinal race which advanced him to the semifinals. In his semifinal, Rinner was fifth place in 48.8. That did not advance him to the final.

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      • #4
        There's nothing in the Official Report about a DQ and nothing mentioned in the LA Times on the day after that race

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        • #5
          No wonder it is obscure...it isn't true...

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          • #6
            Thank you all for researching. I had heard that he ran 47.9 which would have been a NR (if it was true, it would have stayed in the books as a NR for 30 years), but the time was not legal for some reason.

            Rinner was quite the controversial guy. He went to med school, and he was the personal physician of Heinrich Harrer, (the mountaineer who first climbed the Eiger North Face and ended up trapped in Tibet during the war, he was the author of Seven Years in Tibet, and he was supposedly a nazi).

            Harrer may or may not have been a nazi, but there is no doubt about Rinner. On March 11 1938, two days before the “Anschluss”, Rinner led a group of 40 armed thugs from the SS to the Viennese capitol building and occupied it, in an effort to physically remove the chancellor. Two days later Austria was annexed and Rinner was put in charge of sports for the “province” Austria.

            During the war he was the physician-in-charge of the notorious Dachau concentration camp. The news release of his appointment described him as Olympic champion (“Olympiasieger”), just a slight exaggeration. After the war he worked in the pharma industry. He was one of the founders and chairman of “SS Kameradschaft”, an extremist right wing organization of former SS members. He died in 1976.

            If you googled Felix Rinner, you might discover that there is another Austrian athlete with exactly the same unusual name. The young Felix Rinner was born in 1982. He stood 6’6” and was captain of the national volleyball team. He is no longer active and works as a sports physiotherapist. My guess is he’s the nazi’s grandson, but I have no proof of that.

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