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Bob Hayes only losing record

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  • #16
    Congrats to the man from Jacksonville for providing both a confusing question and confusing answer within the same attempt at trivia.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by NotDutra5 View Post
      Congrats to the man from Jacksonville for providing both a confusing question and confusing answer within the same attempt at trivia.
      Yeah . . . no argument here . . . sigh.

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      • #18
        I attending the SFOT so I should be able to figure this out. Richrd Stebbins maybe.

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        • #19
          Drayton had a 0-11 losing record to Hayes in the 100m.

          Hayes' 1961 season, when he was most beatable, ended with the NAIA on 2 June. His only race against Frank Budd was in 1962. Had Hayes gone to the NCAA or AAU in 1961 then he may have ended with a losing record to Budd. In second place at the NAIA was Leroy Jackson, who finished third behind Budd and Jerome at the NCAA that year.
          100m - A New Look at the World's Greatest Race

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          • #20
            A few corrections - In 1962 Hayes ran against Budd twice - initially in the Coliseum relays where he ran a PR 10.2 to beat Budd [10.3], and then in the AAU where Hayes won, and Budd ended his track career with a thigh injury, suffered just as Hayes was passing him at the 50y mark.

            Over 200m/220y Hayes placed 2nd in a heat to Drayton at the 1962 AAU. When both athletes qualify from a prelim there's no win-loss factor. Hayes didn't run in the final where Drayton ran 20.5 =WR. So, as Hayes didn't run, there's no win loss between the 2 men, until...
            Compton 1963 - where Adolph Plummer runs 20.6y to win, ahead of Hayes 20.7 and Drayton 21.1. Hayes was ranked Forum in the world that year, behind Henry Carr, and ahead of Drayton.
            In 1964 they met at Penn, where Hayes ran 20.6 and Drayton 21.0. Then of course Drayton won the OT with Hayes 3rd in 20.7, ahead of Carr's 20.8.

            Rather than having a losing record, Hayes was 2-1 against Drayton in the 200. More surprisingly Hayes was also 2-1 against Carr [just beat Carr 20.8 for both in '63 Coliseum relays, got walloped 20.6 to 20.8 in the '64 Coliseum meet, and beat him in the 64 OT]

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            • #21
              Drayton was a major talent in the early '60's... Always in the mix with the best at 200m.
              I happened to be there to see the well-hyped Budd/Hayes 100 in 1962.... Buddy's mid-race injury was so dramatic it makes me wince to think about 60-years later.

              ​​​​​​​

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              • #22
                Originally posted by rhymans View Post
                More surprisingly Hayes was also 2-1 against Carr [just beat Carr 20.8 for both in '63 Coliseum relays, got walloped 20.6 to 20.8 in the '64 Coliseum meet, and beat him in the 64 OT]
                Actually, Richard, Hayes was 3-1 against Carr. You forgot the time he caught a pass for the Cowboys against the Giants with Carr chasing him to the end zone, but Carr failed to catch him! On the other hand, I doubt that was televised in the UK back then.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by rhymans View Post
                  Rather than having a losing record, Hayes was 2-1 against Drayton in the 200. More surprisingly Hayes was also 2-1 against Carr [just beat Carr 20.8 for both in '63 Coliseum relays, got walloped 20.6 to 20.8 in the '64 Coliseum meet, and beat him in the 64 OT]
                  Richard,

                  I think you have missed the European races involving Hayes and Drayton. According to Track Newsletter (26 Aug 1965), these are all the races over 200 metres/220 yards:

                  23 Jun 1962 1.Drayton 2.Hayes (AAU Walnut) *heat*
                  17 Aug 1962 1.Drayton 2.Hayes (Hassleholm, Sweden)
                  20 Aug 1962 1.Drayton 2.Hayes (Gothenburg, Sweden)
                  7 Jun 1963 1.Plummer 2.Hayes 3.Drayton (Compton)
                  1 Aug 1963 1.Hayes 2.Drayton (Hanover, Germany)
                  15 Aug 1963 1.Hayes 2.Drayton (Oslo, Norway)
                  25 Apr 1964 1.Hayes 2.Drayton (Penn Relays)
                  13 Sep 1964 1. Drayton 2.Stebbins 3.Hayes (FOT)

                  So the count is 4-3 to Hayes (not including the 62 AAU heat), if we include the race where Plummer won.

                  Interestingly, the TN article gives it as 4-3 to Drayton, counting the 62 AAU heat but not counting the Compton race, where Plummer won.

                  I guess that just reflects that the way head-to-head records are determined has changed over the years.

                  There are may races in the TN list where the placings are not fully listed, so Drayton may have finished behind Hayes in some of those too.

                  John.
                  100m - A New Look at the World's Greatest Race

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