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What happened to Michael Granville.

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  • Dave
    replied
    Originally posted by Madd Marine View Post
    Who knows what's behind the randomness?

    Granville's father was maniacal. Which was a shame. I think the kid was burned out, period. Getting away from his pop was probably like having the weight of the world lifted from his shoulders. And Granville always came off as a nice kid - and was still that way as an adult. Seeing the thread reminded me of the Flotrack interview from back in '09. Nice guy, and look at the way he handles the question(s) regarding his not being able to take it to the next level. As long as he's happy, good for him:
    http://www.flotrack.org/coverage/234...r#.VAlE00hSK2w
    What is behind the randomness of reviving the thread was looking at the HS article of al time yearly best athletes.

    Leave a comment:


  • no one
    replied
    watched the video. looks like he could be a fullback or linebacker - a big guy. And affable as well. I had an occasion to attend the Simplot Games some years ago. I'm watching the 800 and this big ol guy takes it out in the semifinals and finishes in about 1:55. Do my homework and he's either a freshman or a soph. So I was thinkin he had hit max - an anomoly of a race/trial. So I'm watching the 800 finals and this big ol guy with seemingly huge legs takes it out again. And I'm waitin for him to die. He didn't die and ran ... faster than the 1:55 and closer to 1:50 - if memory serves, which it often doesn't. His improvement from yr to yr was impressive and after his Sr year - I was convinced there was more in the tank. Not to be. But he presents himself as a guy who has his head on and seems to have a mature perspective on his accomplishments and celebrity. Good for Michael Granville

    Leave a comment:


  • Madd Marine
    replied
    Originally posted by jc203 View Post
    Wow! THIS thread far surpasses the Noon lapse. This one was revived after nearly 11 years. WTF? !?
    Who knows what's behind the randomness?

    Granville's father was maniacal. Which was a shame. I think the kid was burned out, period. Getting away from his pop was probably like having the weight of the world lifted from his shoulders. And Granville always came off as a nice kid - and was still that way as an adult. Seeing the thread reminded me of the Flotrack interview from back in '09. Nice guy, and look at the way he handles the question(s) regarding his not being able to take it to the next level. As long as he's happy, good for him:
    http://www.flotrack.org/coverage/234...r#.VAlE00hSK2w

    Leave a comment:


  • jc203
    replied
    Wow! THIS thread far surpasses the Noon lapse. This one was revived after nearly 11 years. WTF? !?

    Leave a comment:


  • Cooter Brown
    replied
    Originally posted by ;1672570
    He actually ran 1:46.45 in high school.

    The fastest he ever ran at UCLA was 1:47.93 (I'm pretty sure), and that was as a freshman.

    Usain Bolt brown-nosers, take notice: the early bloomers are not always the great ones in the long run.
    Too bad there's no record of who made this statement. In hindsight, it's like betting against indoor plumbing becoming popular.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Duncan
    replied
    Ugh, I've seen all of this happen so many times before with young runners. I probably slipped over to the dark side a bit myself with my own daughter, being the Little League parent.

    It's interesting reading back on this thread regarding Mr. Bolt. I remember once responding to some gushing Bolt fan on YouTube back around 2006 or so that the Americans were going to beat his ass. Talk about having to eat my words!

    Leave a comment:


  • halharkness
    replied
    Michael was not your typical slim 800 meter runner, to the contrary he was quite muscular and very physically mature for his age. Yes, his father was the driving force during high school. Say no more.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave
    replied
    Originally posted by ;1672570
    He actually ran 1:46.45 in high school.

    The fastest he ever ran at UCLA was 1:47.93 (I'm pretty sure), and that was as a freshman.

    Usain Bolt brown-nosers, take notice: the early bloomers are not always the great ones in the long run.
    I found this after looking at the HS series on the front page. Unlike many early phenols, things did seem to work out for young Mr. Bolt.

    Leave a comment:


  • michael lewis
    replied
    Re: What happened to Michael Granville.

    There seems to be plenty of speculation going on in this thread about what might burn out young athletes before their normal prime. While I don't know how this could involve adrenal glands or too much high volume work or whatever, I think we can all agree on one thing: Peak human performance is not reached until much later than the teenage years, at least for the species as a whole. Maybe there are some people for whom it is normal to peak earlier than others, but they would certainly be an exception to the norm. Yet we see many promising young athletes reach their peak well before they "should". I would be interested in knowing if there is solid research (I doubt it) indicating what happened in such cases.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: What happened to Michael Granville.

    <He actually ran 1:46.45 in high school.

    <The fastest he ever ran at UCLA was 1:47.93 (I'm <pretty sure), and that was as a freshman.

    <Usain Bolt brown-nosers, take notice: the early <bloomers are not always the great ones in the <long run.

    In next year Olympics a Bolt will break many (American) hearts.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: What happened to Michael Granville.

    What happened was that when Michael got to college, he got away from his father, who was pushing the kid, living through him. He was mentally burned out by the time he got to UCLA. This is fairly well known around local track fans. When MG lost the state meet as a junior, his father marched off, disgusted, refusing to talk to him - while MG himself feigned some type of injury, and refused to go to the medal stand during the ceremony. The old man was a tyrant. Talking crazy stuff about Michael running 1:42 in HS. Nuts.

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  • trackhead
    replied
    Re: What happened to Michael Granville.

    On sprinters -- the volume of their work would typically be less, even 400m specialists than someone like Granville.

    On this idea -- it's just a theory. I've postulated it to a couple of exercise physiologists and they've said it is interesting but that there is no study or direct data on the subject. So as of now, it's only an idea to explain the results we see.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: What happened to Michael Granville.

    "We know that you train the anaerobic system at the expense of the aerobic system, and that severely overdoing this will cause severe damage to their aerobic system, and I find it likely that when you damage something as an adolscent, it stays damage.

    Possibility 2 is that the intensity of the anaerobic work has put such a demands on the adrenal gland that it can never fully come back, and the kid's endocrine system is damaged."

    I don't think you can physically and permanently damage the adrenal gland and endocrine system from too much speedwork. Where did you get this information come from?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: What happened to Michael Granville.

    On the tangent of why the Kenyans may or may not burn out from overwork, I strongly recommend Toby Tanser's book "Train Hard, Win Easy".

    The discussion on overbearing parents is probably closer to the source of Michael's fizzle. The effect there is to burn out one's heart and passion for the sport. If too much fast training ruined the adrenal system, how would we ever end up with sprinters?

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  • trackhead
    replied
    Re: What happened to Michael Granville.

    >Maybe I'm confusing Granville with somebody else,
    >but isn't he one of those kids who had a really
    >pushy father who micromanaged every inch of his
    >agegroup career? That's a guaranteed recipe for
    >failure too.

    No, that was right. His dad was looney toons. He kicked him out of Hughes Stadium after he lost the state meet his junior year.

    Leave a comment:

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